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County Mayor Issues Executive Order Regarding Face Coverings effective July 8

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On July 3, Tennessee Governor Bill Lee signed Executive Order 54 to grant county mayors in 89 counties the authority to issue local requirements that citizens wear face coverings in public places in order to slow the spread of COVID-19 cases, which have significantly risen in recent weeks. Governor Lee encouraged every Tennessean across the state to use a face covering or mask, to socially distance and wash hands frequently.

After much consideration and after consultation with each of the mayors of the various municipalities in Williamson County, as well as the School Superintendents for the two school districts within the County, Mayor Rogers Anderson finds that there is a consensus that wearing a cloth or other face covering should be required in certain circumstances in Williamson County. Mayor Anderson recognizes that there are many varying opinions on this issue, but believes that asking Williamson Countians to wear a face covering in indoor public places, and in outdoor public places where distancing is not possible, is a necessary safety measure in order that our local businesses may remain open and our schools will be able to open in the fall. …

Please read the full press release and text of the Executive Order.

For more details visit the Frequently Asked Questions webpage about Executive Order 54.

For additional clarification, County Mayor Rogers Anderson issued an Addendum on July 9. Read the Addendum here.

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Vulnerable Populations and Covid-19 from the World Health Organization

Vulnerable Populations and Covid-19 from the World Health Organization

Vulnerable Populations and Covid-19 from the World Health Organization

Excellent Citizens and Notable Partings in Williamson County, Tennessee Book Publication Announcement

What was Special Collections doing during the covid-19 shelter-at-home mandate?

We’re glad you asked! Your Special Collection librarians were right here, working hard on compiling and editing a new book for our department, and for you! As much as we didn’t like the circumstances, we welcomed this time to focus on bringing our work to completion. We fully intend to have our new book available for purchase and/or perusal sometime in June, barring any unforeseen circumstances. 

What is the title?

The long title is: 

Excellent Citizens and Notable Partings: A Further Look at the Popular Series, “Portrait of an Excellent Citizen,” Published in The Review-Appeal, 1966-1968, in Franklin, Tennessee

What made you compile a book? 

Inspiration. It’s as simple as that. Nearly two years ago, an old box of donated items provided  hours of delight and entertainment as we combed through its contents. Among the assorted papers, we found a nearly complete set of Review-Appeal “Portrait of an Excellent Citizen” clippings which, we soon discovered, ran as a series between the years 1966-1968. We were intrigued by this Review-Appeal appointed group of outstanding citizens, so highly regarded that each face was individually hand drawn by Tennessean staff artist, Bill Duke. 

Why these citizens?

Each generation recognizes those among us who stand out, the ones getting things done, the ones everyone either knows or “knows of.” How the Review-Appeal “Portrait of an Excellent Citizen” series came into being is a bit of a mystery, as well as their selection process. It seemed to have just appeared out of the blue, with no introduction and no conclusion. However, once re-discovered, we quickly recognized that this collection of citizen portraits gave us a unique snapshot of Williamson County and some, but not all, of the more visible citizens of the late 1960s, and that in itself was significant. While our nation was in the throes of political turmoil and cultural revolution, it would seem that business and life went on as usual in Williamson County.

Why is this book important?

As we began to wonder how the lives of these “Excellent Citizens” played out and what it would look like to read their end-of-life story, we set out to locate their obituaries and other articles. After compiling a fair amount of additional material, it was easy to see the treasure we had unearthed. We knew if we could get this all into a book, it would become an important resource for present and future researchers in finding family connections and aiding their understanding of these citizens and their place in our midst. For added interest, we threaded in ads of the era found in the Review-Appeal, The Williamson Leader, and the local Franklin phone directory. We also used quotations and excerpts from other local sources whenever possible.

Are any of the Excellent Citizens still living?

Yes, only about 10. For those citizens who are still living, we sent letters or called asking for their help, or their family’s help, in creating an updated entry for them. Most were happy to do so. And as word got out, some families of those citizens already gone were eager to help as well. In that way, we were able to amass original and important additional content for many of our living and deceased Excellent Citizens.

Are there other books about local people from Williamson County?

Yes, there are quite a few wonderful biographies, and several narratives of life in Franklin which are very  entertaining as well as factual. We are eager to point out to our readers works such as Who’s Who in Williamson County by Jane Bowman Owen, Who’s Who in Williamson County by Nat Osborne, Jr., and Who’s Who in Williamson County by Derry Carlisle, reprints of the Review-Appeal column of the same name published over a span of 35 years, all colorfully written and re-published by Rick Warwick. We also encourage our patrons to read the narratives of locals who have chronicled their own lives in Williamson County during this era, and in doing so, have animated the lives of many other citizens, some featured in our book. Look for works by Leonard Isaacs, Russ Farnsworth, Bill Peach, Bobby Langley, Jimmy Gentry, W.C. Yates, and others. Many of these are available to check out at WCPL.

Why are these 143 citizens important?

In today’s world, we have “social media” and “influencers,” but these men and women of the late 1960s were influential — they were doers, and their lives reflected their interaction with and influence in the community. For a time, they were all here in this one place, together, the stalwarts of their day. We hope this book, which we have painstakingly compiled and edited, will provide its readers and researchers with a useful resource as well as a source of memories of a time gone by, now known as The Sixties. 

Watch for details about our new book, Excellent Citizens and Notable Partings, coming out soon!

From the Special Collections Department

Marcia P. Fraser and Ashleigh M. Florida

WCPLS Memorial Day Closing on May 25

Library2Go will be unavailable on Monday, May 25, as all Branches of the Williamson County Public Library System will be closed.

Please join us in observing the Williamson County Memorial Day Service at 10 am online due to the Pandemic.

“Due to the current COVID-19 Pandemic and Governor Lee’s Executive Order No. 17 and The Tennessee Pledge, the annual Memorial Day Service will not be held as a live event at the county’s Veterans’ Park for 2020.  Instead the Memorial Day Service will be produced for broadcast by the county’s WC-TV personnel.”

For more information: http://www.williamsoncounty-tn.gov/calendar.aspx?eid=5285

Library2Go services will resume on Tuesday, May 26, at all Branches. 

5G Infographic from the World Health Organization

Garlic Infographic from the World Health Organization

Williamson County COVID-19 Testing Site Closed for Memorial Day

The Williamson County Health Department (WCHD) COVID-19 testing and mask distribution site at the Williamson County Agricultural Center will be closed for Memorial Day on Monday, May 25th.

“Please join us in using this holiday to reflect on the sacrifices that our military personnel have made for our Country,” said Williamson County Health Department Director, Cathy Montgomery.  The health department has been using national and state guard medics and administrative personnel to assist in their testing efforts.

Free COVID-19 drive-through testing and mask distribution will resume on Tuesday, May 26th. Following Memorial Day, the Department will continue to provide testing Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Williamson County Agricultural Center located at 4215 Long Lane, Franklin TN.

WCHD would like to remind the community to follow CDC guidelines by physically distancing and wearing a mask while in public settings. Businesses should continue to follow Governor Lee’s Tennessee Pledge Guidelines which can be found here: https://www.tn.gov/governor/covid-19/economic-recovery.html

For developing information, individuals can subscribe to Williamson County’s Public Information text opt-in system by texting keyword WCCOVID to 888-777.

TDH is posting updated COVID-19 case numbers by 2 p.m. CDT each day at www.tn.gov/health/cedep/ncov.html. Find additional information at www.tn.gov/governor/covid-19.html and www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html.

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Visit the Williamson County Emergency Management COVID-19 page online at williamsonready.org/Coronavirus.

Connect with WCEMA on Facebook and Twitter

COVID-19 Drive-through Testing Continues in Williamson County

Franklin, Tenn. – The Williamson County Health Department (WCHD) is continuing to offer free COVID-19 drive-through testing and mask distribution for the community on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Williamson County Agricultural Center located at 4215 Long Lane, Franklin TN.

MASK DISTRIBUTION

Public health nurses and/or National Guard and State Guard medics will collect nasal swabs for those who want to be tested, and test results may be available within 72 hours after the samples arrive at the lab, depending on lab volume.  Individuals do not have to present symptoms to be tested.  Masks will continue to be distributed while supplies last. 

In an effort to plan for potentially high testing turnout, large businesses recommending their employees be tested are encouraged to call the Williamson County Public Information line at (615) 595-4880. The line is operational Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Businesses are asked to provide an approximate number of employees that desire to receive a test.

WCHD would like to remind the community to follow CDC guidelines by physically distancing and wearing a mask while in public settings. Businesses should continue to follow Governor Lee’s Tennessee Pledge Guidelines which can be found here: https://www.tn.gov/governor/covid-19/economic-recovery.html

For developing information, individuals can subscribe to the  Williamson County’s Public Information text opt-in system by texting keyword WCCOVID to 888-777.

TDH is posting updated COVID-19 case numbers by 2 p.m. CDT each day at www.tn.gov/health/cedep/ncov.htmlFind additional information at www.tn.gov/governor/covid-19.html and www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html.

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Visit the Williamson County Emergency Management COVID-19 page online at williamsonready.org/Coronavirus.

Connect with WCEMA on Facebook and Twitter

Library2Go Updated to Improve Service at Main Library

board with tiles that spell thank you on it

We have had an overwhelming response to our Library2Go curbside service and are adjusting to the demand. In order to alleviate some of the congestion on our phone lines, we want to ask patrons not to call to let us know when they are here in the parking lot.  Please pull up along the sidewalk at the entryway.  We are putting up signage so you will know where to stop. Library staff will be at the door to take your name, go back inside to put your items on the Library2Go table, then step back inside so you can retrieve them.

Free masks will be on the Library2Go table too, courtesy of the Williamson County Health Department and the State of Tennessee.

Updated Library 2 Go service*:

Hours:
Monday-Tuesday, 9-5
Wednesday 9-1 and Thursday-Sat, 9-5

1. Call us at 615-595-1277 to request up to 10 items per family or to pick up your item(s) currently being held on the hold shelf**.

2. Staff will find the items and check them out to you.

3. Staff will call you to let you know when your items are ready for pickup and to come to the Main Library in Franklin from 9-1 and 2-5, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday plus 9-1 on Wednesdays.

4. Staff will instruct you to drive up to the front door where they will take your name.

5. Staff will go inside, get your bag and put it on the “Library 2 Go Pick Up” table between the sliding glass doors. Your checkout slip will be in the bag with your books.

6. Once the inside doors close behind the staff member, you may retrieve your items.

8. Return items such as books, dvds and audiobooks may be put in the outside return book drop.

*Your Library account must be in good standing with not more than $3 in fines and no overdues. Staff will discuss when you call if this is a barrier to service.

**Items on hold prior to the “safer at home” initiative are still on hold and may be picked up.

 

We currently are not able to place holds and route books via the courier. If there is a book you want at one of our branches, you can contact them to request it and pick it up curbside at their location. Our Nolensville, Fairview, & College Grove Branches are operating their curbside service from 10-4, Monday-Friday. Beginning Tuesday, May 12, our Bethesda & Leiper’s Fork Branches will be running their curbside service from 10-4, Tuesday-Friday.

This service is “use at your own risk.”  For your own safety, we recommend wearing gloves when picking up your items.  Library Staff wipe down the book covers when received and wear gloves as we handle materials but we have no method for cleaning pages.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/03/200320192755.htm

Our goal is to maintain a manageable level of items going in and out that we can disinfect and loan with the number of staff on duty.  These guidelines may be changed based on new information during the current pandemic and/or due to the need to adapt the procedure as it is implemented.  Your understanding of the current limitations is greatly appreciated.

COVID-19 DRIVE-THROUGH TESTING EVENT SCHEDULED FOR WILLIAMSON COUNTY SATURDAY, APRIL 25TH

Franklin, Tenn. – The Williamson County Health Department (WCHD) is hosting COVID-19 drive-through testing event for the community on April 25, 2020 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Williamson County Agricultural Center on 4215 Long Lane, Franklin TN.

Copy of Williamson County Agricultural Center (4)

“Anyone with health concerns, or who has concerns about the health of a family member, is invited to come this weekend to receive testing for COVID-19,” said Cathy Montgomery, County Health Director. “This testing will be provided at no cost to participants, and those who come for testing may remain in their vehicles throughout the process.”

WCHD continues to provide testing Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Agricultural Center. Public health nurses and/or National Guard and State Guard medics will collect nasal swabs from those who want to be tested, and test results may be available within 72 hours after the samples arrive at the lab, depending on lab volume.

Testing at the Williamson County Ag Center

Individuals can subscribe to the  Williamson County’s Public Information text opt-in system by texting keyword WCCOVID to 888-777. 

TDH is posting updated COVID-19 case numbers by 2 p.m. CDT each day at www.tn.gov/health/cedep/ncov.html. Find additional information at www.tn.gov/governor/covid-19.html and www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html.

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Visit the Williamson County Emergency Management COVID-19 page online at williamsonready.org/Coronavirus.

Connect with WCEMA on Facebook and Twitter

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