Blog Archives

It’s the Time of the Season for … Solving Mysteries

by Chelsea Bennett, Reference Department

Treetops, aflame. The air, crisp. Bonfires, hot cider, plaid shirts as far as the eye can see: classic signs of winter. Here’s one more timeless association for you: whodunits. Whether you’re into the classics, the creepies, or the cozies, winter is the perfect time of year to shroud yourself in Mystery.

Publishing professional Valerie Peterson divides the Mystery genre into four main types, and many subgenres. She starts with the types: Hard-Boiled (moody detectives and femmes fatales), Soft-Boiled (similar, but less explicitly violent or sexy), Cozy (Miss Marple and her descendants), and Procedural (thorough analysis of cops and crimes). Within those types, you may find any combination of hijinks and capers, amateur sleuths, local flavor, daunting puzzles, gritty detectives, historical figures, cats, romance, and more. [1]

Unless you simply “hate being titillated,” there’s bound to be a Mystery out there for you. Below, I’ve listed some of the genre’s best-loved authors, both classic and modern. Since mystery writers love to stick with their characters, I’ll sometimes include a character or series name rather than a book title.

(Quick note: some Mysteries have more intense content than others, especially if they cross into Thriller territory. If you’re concerned about potential triggers, check out a site like www.doesthedogdie.com, which helps you steer clear of certain content. You can also check out our blog post about cozy mysteries!)

 


Jennifer Finney BoylanLong Black Veil

K. Chesterton – Catholic priest and amateur detective Father Brown stars in 53 of Chesterton’s short stories.* Netflix has the BBC’s adaptation.

Agatha Christie – Christie’s 75 novels run the gamut from fun and cozy to truly chilling. Miss Marple and Hercule Poirot, her two most famous characters, each appear in dozens of works. And Then There Were None is a must-read, but Christie named Ordeal by Innocence and Crooked House as her favorites among her own books.*

Mary Higgins ClarkWhere Are the Children?; A Stranger Is Watching; Loves Music, Loves to Dance

Harlan CobenTell No One; The Woods; Fool Me Once; the overlapping Myron Bolitar and Mickey Bolitar series (a sports agent and his nephew)

Wilkie CollinsThe Law and the Lady; The Moonstone; The Woman in White

Michael ConnellyHarry Bosch series. This bestselling police procedural series forms the basis for Amazon’s TV series, Bosch.

Deborah CrombieDuncan Kincaid & Gemma James series (Scotland Yard)

Colin DexterInspector Morse series (a senior criminal investigator who loves Wagner, cryptic crossword puzzles, and cask ale)

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle – The character of Sherlock Holmes needs no introduction. Doyle’s non-Sherlockian mysteries include The Mystery of Cloomber, and short stories such as “J. Habakuk Jephson’s Statement.” *

Barry Eisler – Eisler is a former covert CIA operative, a trained lawyer, and a black belt martial artist. His three series each feature a different hero: assassin John Rain, black ops soldier Ben Treven, and SVU detective Livia Lone.

James Ellroy – The L.A. Quartet (The Black Dahlia; The Big Nowhere; L.A. Confidential; White Jazz)

Dashiell Hammett – Because of The Maltese Falcon, The Thin Man, and a host of series and short stories, The New York Times eulogized Hammett as “the dean of the… ‘hard-boiled’ school of detective fiction.”*

Kellye GarrettHollywood Homicide

Tess GerritsenThe Bone Garden

Lamar GilesOverturned (YA)

Alexia Gordon – The Gethsemane Brown Mysteries (an African-American classical musician)

Sue Grafton – Famous for her Alphabet Mystery series (A is for Alibi, etc.), Grafton passed away after completing Y is for Yesterday. “[As] far as we in the family are concerned, the alphabet now ends at Y,” wrote Grafton’s daughter. [2]

Carl Hiaasen – “America’s finest satirical novelist” is a “laugh-out-loud funny and thoroughly entertaining” “master of the revenge fantasy.” [3] Try Tourist Season, Strip Tease, Skin Tight, or Double Whammy for a taste of his madcap, Florida-based mysteries.

Patricia Highsmith Strangers on a Train; Deep Water; The Glass Cell; The Talented Mr. Ripley

Tony HillermanLeaphorn & Chee series (Navajo Tribal Police)

Joe IdeIQ series (an unconventional, unofficial detective)

P. D. JamesDeath Comes to Pemberly; Adam Dalgliesh series (Scotland Yard)

Iris JohansenEve Duncan series (a forensic sculptor)

Ausma Zehanat KhanThe Unquiet Dead

Laurie R. KingMary Russell series (a teenage girl who becomes Sherlock Holmes’ apprentice)

Attica LockeJay Porter series (a struggling Texas lawyer)

Sujata MasseyPerveen Mistry series (historical fiction; India’s first female lawyer)

John MortimerHorace Rumpole is “an ageing London barrister who defends any and all clients.” [4]

Abir MukherjeeSam Wyndham (Scotland Yard, historical fiction)

Jo Nesbø – Brilliant and troubled, Harry Hole (pronounced Hoo-leh) comes from Oslo, Norway, but his work takes him around the world. The series has been translated into English out of order; Hole first appears in The Bat.*

Leonardo Padura – The Mario Conde quartet is on Netflix as the Four Seasons in Havana miniseries.*

Sara Paretsky – Fierce, independent, and sharp, private detective V. I. Warshawski (Victoria) specializes in white-collar crime.

Louise PennyChief Inspector Gamache (character-driven, set in provincial Quebec)*

Dr. Kwei QuarteyDarko Dawson (a detective in Ghana)

Marcie RendonMurder on the Red River

Tess SharpeFar from You (YA)

George Simenon – Simenon’s legendary detective Jules Maigret has been portrayed by a wide range of actors, from Shakespearean stars (Charles Laughton) to slapstick comics (Rowan Atkinson). But why not picture him for yourself? He appears in 76 novels and 28 short stories.

Dwayne Alexander SmithForty Acres; The Unkind Hours

Sherry ThomasLady Sherlock series

Stephanie TromleyTrouble Is a Friend of Mine (YA)

Nicola UpsonJosephine Tey (British theatre in the 1930s)

Randy Wayne WhiteDoc Ford series (a marine biologist / ex-CIA)

 


Sources:

* indicates quotations and stats were taken from Wikipedia pages about the authors and/or their works

 

Advertisements

Little Known (but AMAZING) Graphic Novels

By Lon Maxwell, Reference Department

Comic Books, Graphic Novels, Sequential Art; call it what you want it is still one of the hottest collections in libraries and book stores. The greatest thing is that you can find wonderful reads at your reading level and every level below you. You could probably go the other way, but some of the content of the teen and adults graphic novels are a little much for our younger readers. I am lucky enough to have a kid in the children’s section and one in the teen’s section so I get exposed to a lot of great comic books passing through our house and stuff I might of missed is thrust into my face (often literally) with an exuberant “Read this, Dad!” on a regular basis. Whether it’s collected volumes of individual issues, manga volumes from overseas, or new purpose written stories, these books are showing up in every library for every age group and here are some of the best you might miss.

In the Children’s Library:

There are a plethora of options for everyone in the children’s section. There are the standard Pokémon and superhero books and some graphic novels based on mythology that are all good, but there are also some hidden gems with the power to delight all ages.

Kazu Kibuishi’s Amulet Series is a favorite for all ages. This bildungsroman tells Emily and her brother’s story as they travel worlds, fight elves and search for their mother. It is remarkably evocative and pulls no punches, despite being written with children primarily in mind. It will only take ten pages before you realize this series may require tissues.

Judd Winick’s HiLo Series was originally designed to be an all-ages comic that he could use to show kids his work. The alien boy who came to earth tale really does appeal to all ages as Winick uses his gift for storytelling to create a story for all

Scott Chantler’s The Three Thieves series is one of the best series of fantasy comics I’ve ever read. The story keeps making you think you know what’s going on only to take another unexpected twist. This comic has heart and pathos as well as action and wonderful characters.

Rapunzel’s Revenge and Calamity Jack by Shannon and Dean Hale is a western fantasy meets steampunk fairytale mashup. The couple that brought you some of the outrageously popular Squirrel Girl storylines has a series of their own. Rapunzel and Jack are far more different than you’ve ever seen them before and the changes make them more interesting.

In the Teen Section:

Here we find the meat of the graphic novels. Here is most of the manga, almost all of the mainstream DC and Marvel titles, and all the avant-garde books like Maus that have hit such heights of recognition that they sometimes appear on school reading lists. It’s hard to find something that a teen hasn’t already talked up but here are a few options.

Takehiko Inoue and Vagabond tell the fictionalized tale of the life of Miyamoto Musashi. In recounting the tales of the life of one of Japan’s most famous and dangerous samurai, the series does not paint too nice a picture. The art is fantastic, the subject mythical and the story compelling.

Age of Bronze from Eric Shanower is another retelling. In this case it is a graphic version of the Trojan War. Shanower takes the tale back to its roots as sequential pictures on ancient Greek vases and fleshes out the whole story not just the small sliver we know from the Iliad. Best of all, after a long hiatus, this series is finally getting continued.

Superman: True Brit by Kim Johnson and John Cleese bring you the only superhero entry on the list. The man who created some of Monty Python’s best helps to create an Elseworlds man of steel who was brought up in England. At times you’ll think he ended up Clark Dursley.

Makoto Yukimura’s Planetes is the story of space garbage men. It tells the tale of several characters that remove space debris and their goals and personalities. While it is a near future science fiction tale, this series is really a character driven masterpiece.

In the Adult Department:

All those great graphic novels that make the New York Times Review of Books or are mentioned in The Atlantic are here.  From the classic old Peanut’s strips through the biographical Persepolis to the big publishing house critical darlings of The Sandman and Fables, they’re over with the adult books.

Blade of the Immortal just became a major, live action motion picture in the last few years but the graphic novel series by Hiroaki Samura is over 25 years old. It takes a common theme, redemption, and tells the hackneyed story in way that makes you still care how it turns out.

Brian K. Vaughn’s We Stand on Guard starts in the year 2112, 300 years after the war of 1812. It tells the story of freedom fighters taking on their technological giant oppressor and doing their best to renew their way of life. The political commentary and twist in the aggressor/defender relationship is truly spectacular.

Abe Sapien from Hellboy and BPRD is a newer edition. Mike Mignola has focused on telling the story of the aquatic amnesiac in his new collection. More than a spin off, it is rather an opportunity to expand on a fan favorite character. A green skinned, gill breathing fleshing out of a great soul.

Valerian is another one that was a movie recently. Luc Besson’s infatuation with this Franco-Belgian comic has influenced his films and caused him to adapt one of the stories into a major motion picture. Pierre Christin and artist Jean-Claude Mézières tell the tale of a galaxy traveling time hopping duo with interesting characterization. The European art style also provides an interesting change for those used to North American or Asian drawing techniques.

The Cartoon History of the Universe is my final entry here. Larry Gonnick uses with and silly art to guide readers on a journey through our semi-mythic prehistory and all the way to the creation of the modern world. His often overlooked works are as informative as they are entertaining.

So while these books aren’t as well known now as I might think they deserve, here’s to hoping that a few of you out there might pick up a book and take up their cause with me. I can guarantee you’ll find something on here that will amuse you.

Scary Reads for Kids

By Alysia Maxwell, WCPLtn Library

It’s Halloween and that means it’s time for the creepy crawlies and the monsters to come out.  Kids are planning their costumes and their routes to the houses that give out the best candy. Houses are decked out in spider webs and eerie lights, and people are reveling in the supernatural and the macabre.

As parents, this time of year can be hard. We often want to protect children from the scariest things out there, but how much do we protect them and how much do we let them experience some of the fun of the season?  After all, what is it that we love so much about scary stories? Why do we seek out the things that send prickles down our spine? As adults we think that it’s that rush of adrenaline that comes from our senses being on high alert; but it’s more than that.  It’s also the relief that floods your body when you realize there’s not really someone hiding the closet. It’s the calm that washes away the fear when you know you are not in danger; everything is fine. You are safe.

That’s what it really comes down to, not the fear, but the feeling of safety.  No one actually wants to be scared all the time. We seek it out when feeling safe becomes too commonplace, too work-a-day, too boring.  We chase that rush of fear so that we can appreciate that feeling of tranquility again.

Kids are searching for that too, although they may not realize it.  The whole world is big and scary to them and they need to feel that reassurance as much as adults do, possibly even more so.  Of course, every kid is different and what barely startles one might be too much for another. I’m not telling you to traumatize your children, but don’t shy away from letting them read something that might be a little scary.  Let them experience those shivers so they can feel safe again. What could possibly be safer than being snuggled up warm with mom and dad reading a book together? Here are some great stories to read with your kids that will give you both the shivers.

Wolves in the Walls by Neil Gaiman; Lucy hears  noises coming from inside the walls.  She is sure that there are wolves in the walls, but her family doesn’t believe it.  They tell her, “If the wolves come out of the walls, it’s all over”. This picture book is great for a younger crowd because it is punctuated with humorous moments that break up the tension. When the wolves finally do come out of the walls they end up doing silly things like wearing Lucy’s socks and eating toast and jam.  This story says to kids that the thing they are afraid of may turn out to be not as bad as they think, and maybe even something they can handle just fine.

Another Gaiman gem for slightly older kids is Coraline.  Yes, it is a movie and a graphic novel, both of which are fantastic – but for me, nothing beats the original novel.  Something about the way the light glints off the button eyes of the Other Mother is so sinister and frightening. Here is a story that is precisely that search for excitement and return to safety.  Coraline is bored with her uneventful life, but her search for adventure ends up more than she bargained for. When she goes exploring the house and finds a mysteriously (sometimes) bricked up doorway it leads her to a very unnerving and terrifying version of her own life. It hits kids close to home with a seemingly idyllic family trying to steal her away from her real family. And no adult comes to her rescue. Coraline is the heroine of her own story and must rescue herself as well as her parents.  What better way to empower a child than to show them they can face their own fear and conquer it.

The Jumbies by Tracey Baptiste is a wonderfully spooky story based on Caribbean folklore. There are menacing creatures in the woods with glowing eyes and dark intentions. Corinne believes they are just stories made up to get children to behave, but maybe they are not made up after all. There is a witch whose beauty and attractiveness give her an ominous quality, especially when she tries to insert herself into Corinne’s family.  Once again the children are the ones who have to confront that which they fear and defeat it. Baptiste gives us fresh monsters to fuel the imagination.

Scarlett Hart Monster Hunter by Marcus Sedgwick reads more like an adventure story than a terror filled one, however this graphic novel does feature zombies, gargoyles and all sorts of otherworldly foes as well as a very earthly one as well.  Scarlett’s got grit and gadgets and her own faithful retainer (sort of like Batman’s Alfred) to help her bring down the baddies.

Guys Read: Terrifying Tales collected by Jon Scieszka is a great compilation of middle grade short stories by various authors including, among others, the master of kids’ horror himself R.L. Stein of Goosebumps fame. These are fun for reading quick stories each night (under the covers of course!)

The Prince of Mist by Carlos Ruiz Zafon. Parents may have read his beautiful Shadow of the Wind, but this oft overlooked YA title is particularly disturbing.  Max and his sister Alicia move to a small town and soon discover their new house holds a dark secret from the past.  They must uncover the mystery of a spectral creature who is trying to collect an old debt. If the weeping angels in Doctor Who send a chill up your spine this one is right up your alley.

The fun of Halloween is allowing ourselves to feel that delicious prickle of fear followed by the reassurance that we are not about to be eaten after all!  So grab a book and a flashlight, pull the blankets over your heads, and have fun reading these scary stories!

Book List: Libraries Rock!

by Chelsea Bennett, Reference Department

School’s back in session for Williamson County, and we’re looking forward to a great school year for our awesome teachers and students. But it’s been a summer to remember, thanks in part to WCPL’s Summer Reading Program! The theme was “Libraries Rock!” and you all – adults, teens, and kids alike – seemed to have a great time with it.

Nearly 70 adult patrons participated in the program, and they read almost 400 books among them! We gave out about 120 prizes, including lots of books (of course) and gift cards donated by beloved local shops and restaurants.*

This post focuses on a display aimed at our adult patrons, but I’d be remiss if I didn’t give a shout-out to our amazing teens and kids. One teen reader alone devoured 104 books throughout the summer! (Do we have a future writer here?) And 2,300 children throughout the Williamson County Public Library system participated by reading, reviewing, and attending events. I’m so impressed, y’all. (The teens’ and children’s departments also handed out tons of prizes.)

Recommended method for reading 104 books in a single summer.

Our main floor book display stayed up all summer. In keeping with the Summer Reading Program’s theme, we featured books about readers and rockers, libraries and lyrics, bookshelves and the blues and – well, you get the picture. If you didn’t have the chance to make it through all the intriguing titles, we’ve got the list right here for you to peruse at your leisure. After all, summer in Middle Tennessee really lasts through September, right?


Biography & Memoir

  • Unfaithful Music & Disappearing Ink by Elvis Costello (B COSTELLO)
  • Sing for Your Life: a story of race, music, and family by Daniel Bergner (B GREEN)
  • The World’s Strongest Librarian: a memoir of Tourette’s, faith, strength, and the power of family by Joshua Hanagarne (B HANAGARNE)
  • Waylon: tales of my outlaw dad by Terry Jennings (B JENNINGS)
  • It’s a Long Story: my life by Willie Nelson (B NELSON)
  • Stand up Straight and Sing! by Jessye Norman (B NORMAN)
  • Soul Serenade: rhythm, blues & coming of age through vinyl by Rashod Ollison (B OLLISON)
  • The Universal Tone by Carlos Santana (B SANTANA)
  • Turn Around Bright Eyes: the rituals of love and karaoke by Rob Sheffield (B SHEFFIELD)
  • More Room in a Broken Heart: the true adventures of Carly Simon by Stephen Davis (B SIMON)
  • M Train by Patti Smith (B SMITH)
  • Hank: the short life and long country road of Hank Williams by Mark Ribowsky (B WILLIAMS)

Fiction

  • The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto by Mitch Albom (F ALBOM)
  • Reservation Blues by Sherman Alexie (F ALE)
  • A Pleasure to Burn: Fahrenheit 451 stories by Ray Bradbury (F BRA)
  • People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks (F BRO)
  • Telegraph Avenue by Michael Chabon (F CHA)
  • Tender: a novel by Mark Childress (F CHI)
  • The Archivist by Martha Cooley (F COO)
  • Last Train to Memphis by Elsa Cook (F COOK)
  • Marrying Mozart by Stephanie Cowell (F COW)
  • Oh, Play That Thing by Roddy Doyle (F DOYLE)
  • The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco (F ECO)
  • The Geographer’s Library by Jon Fasman (F FAS)
  • The Camel Bookmobile by Marsha Hamilton (F HAM)
  • The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love by Oscar Hijuelos (F HIJ)
  • High Fidelity by Nick Hornby (F HOR)
  • Open Season by Linda Howard (F HOW)
  • Nocturnes by Kazuo Ishiguro (F ISH)
  • The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova (F KOSTOVA)
  • White Tears by Hari Kunzru (F KUNZRU)
  • The Borrower by Rebecca Makkai (F MAK)
  • The Librarian and the Spy by Susan Mann (F MANN)
  • Doctor Faustus by Thomas Mann (F MAN)
  • Dragonsong by Anne McCaffrey (F MCCAFFREY)
  • Amsterdam by Ian McEwan (F MCEWAN)
  • Books Can Be Deceiving by Jenn McKinlay (F MCKINLAY)
  • The Inner Circle by Brad Meltzer (F MEL)
  • The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger (F NIF)
  • The Song Is You by Arthur Phillips (F PHI)
  • Never Mind the Pollacks by Neal Pollack (F POL)
  • Accordion Crimes by Annie Proulx (F PRO)
  • Vivaldi’s Virgins by Barbara Quick (F QUI)
  • The Good Luck of Right Now by Matthew Quick (F QUICK)
  • Bellweather Rhapsody by Kate Racculia (F RACCULIA)
  • The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz (F RUI)
  • The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield (F SETTERFIELD)
  • Rock Bottom by Michael Shilling (F SHI)
  • Say Goodbye: the Laurie Moss story by Lewis Shiner (F SHI)
  • The Book of Speculation by Erika Swyler (F SWYLER)
  • Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien (F THIEN)
  • Music & Silence by Rose Tremain (F TRE)

Nonfiction

  • This Book Is Overdue!: how librarians and cybrarians can save us all by Marilyn Johnson (020 JOH)
  • Letter to a future lover: marginalia, errata, secrets, inscriptions, and other ephemera found in libraries by Ander Monson (020.8 MON)
  • The Vanished Library: a wonder of the ancient world by Luciano Canfora (026.932 CAN)
  • Library: an unquiet history by Matthew Battles (027 BAT)
  • At home with books: how booklovers live with and care for their libraries by Estelle Ellis (027.1 ELL)
  • The Library at Night by Alberto Manguel (027.4 MAN)
  • Part of Our Lives: a people’s history of the American public library by Wayne A. Wiegand (027.473 WIE)
  • America’s Library: the story of the Library of Congress, 1800-2000 by James Conaway (027.573 CON)
  • Running the Books: the adventures of an accidental prison librarian by Avi Steinberg (027.665092 STE)
  • Books that Build Character: a guide to teaching your child moral values through stories by William Kilpatrick (028.5 KIL)
  • The Books that Changed My Life: reflections by 100 authors, actors, musicians, and other remarkable people by Bethanne Patrick, ed. (028.9 BOO)
  • The Little Guide to Your Well-read Life by Steve Leveen (028.9 LEV)
  • Bibliotherapy: the girl’s guide to books for every phase of our lives by Nancy Peske and Beverly West (028.9 PES)
  • Remarkable Reads: 34 writers and their adventures in reading by J. Peder Zane, ed. (028.9 REM)
  • Unpacking My Library: writers and their books by Leah Price, ed. (028.9 UNP)
  • Honky-tonk Gospel: the story of sin and salvation in country music by Gene Edward Veith and Thomas L. Wilmeth (261.5 VEI)
  • Taboo Tunes: a history of banned bands & censored songs by Peter Blecha (303.376 BLE)
  • Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop: a history of the hip-hop generation by Jeff Chang (306.484249 CHA)
  • Dewey: the small-town library cat who touched the world by Vicki Myron with Bret Witter (636.80929 MYR)
  • Beethoven’s Hair by Russell Martin (780 MAR)
  • And You Shall Know Us by the Trail of Our Vinyl: the Jewish past as told by the records we have loved and lost by Roger Bennett and Josh Kun (780.89924073 BEN)
  • Mozart’s Starling by Lyanda Lynn Haupt (780.92 HAU)
  • Waking the Spirit: a musician’s journey healing body, mind, and soul by Andrew Schulman (780.92 SCH)
  • Beethoven’s Skull: dark, strange, and fascinating tales from the world of classical music and beyond by Tim Rayborn (780.922 RAY)
  • Children of the Stone: the power of music in a hard land by Sandy Tolan (780.95695309051 TOL)
  • Your Favorite Band Is Killing Me: what pop music rivalries reveal about the meaning of life by Steven Hyden (781.64 HYD)
  • The Chitlin’ Circuit: and the road to rock ‘n’ roll by Preston Lauterbach (781.6408 LAU)
  • Love Goes to Buildings on Fire: five years in New York that changed music forever by Will Hermes (781.6409747 HER)
  • Pilgrimage to Dollywood: a country music road trip through Tennessee by Helen Morales (781.64209768 MOR)
  • Higher Ground: Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin, Curtis Mayfield, and the rise and fall of American soul by Craig Werner (781.644 WER)
  • The Book of Exodus: the making and meaning of Bob Marley and the Wailers’ album of the century by Vivien Goldman (781.646092 GOL)
  • Bubblegum Music is the Naked Truth by Kim Cooper and David Smay, ed. (781.66 BUB)
  • Corn Flakes with John Lennon: and other tales from a rock ‘n’ roll life by Robert Hilburn (781.66092 HIL)
  • Language of the Spirit: an introduction to classical music by Jan Swafford (781.68 SWA)
  • Go down Moses: a celebration of the African-American spiritual by Richard Newman (782.25 NEW)
  • Shake It Up: great American writing on rock and pop from Elvis to Jay Z by Jonathan Letham and Kevin Dettmar, ed. (782.4216 SHA)
  • Dark Midnight When I Rise: the story of the Jubilee Singers, who introduced the world to the music of Black America by Andrew Ward (782.42162 WAR)
  • Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!: the story of pop music from Bill Haley to Beyoncé by Bob Stanley (782.4216309 STA)
  • I Hate Myself and Want to Die: the 52 most depressing songs you’ve ever heard by Tom Reynolds (782.42164 REY)
  • Hard Rain: a Dylan commentary by Tim Riley (782.42164 RIL)
  • Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison: the making of a masterpiece by Michael Streissguth (782.421642092 STR)
  • Who Shot Ya?: an illustrated history of hip hop by Ernie Paniccioli (782.421649 PAN)
  • Songs in the Rough: from “Heartbreak Hotel” to “Rhythm nation” : rock’s greatest songs in first-draft form by Steven Bishop, ed. (782.42166 BIS)
  • The Beatles Lyrics: the stories behind the music, including the handwritten drafts of more than 100 classic Beatles songs by Hunter Davies, ed. (782.42166 DAV)
  • Alice Cooper, Golf Monster: a rock ‘n’ roller’s 12 steps to becoming a golf addict by Alice Cooper (782.42166092 COO)
  • Danny Boy: the beloved Irish ballad by Malachy McCourt (782.4309415 MACC)
  • The Soloist: a lost dream, an unlikely friendship, and the redemptive power of music by Steve Lopez (787.2092 LOP)
  • In the Stacks: short stories about libraries and librarians by Michael Cart, ed. (808.83 IN)
  • Leonard Cohen: poems and songs by Leonard Cohen (811 COH)

* Many thanks to our local sponsors, who provided prizes for our adult summer reading program:

  • Mafiaoza’s
  • Belvedere Commons of Franklin
  • Landmark Booksellers
  • Mellow Mushroom
  • Pueblo Real
  • McCreary’s Irish Pub
  • Frist Art Museum
  • Handy Hardware
  • Puckett’s Grocery & Restaurant
  • Franklin Theatre
  • Schakolad
  • Nashville Pet Products

Rockin’ Reads For Kids

By Stacy Parish, Children’s Department

In honor of this year’s summer reading “Libraries Rock” theme, here is a random assortment of rockin’ reads for the young, or young at heart.  In absolutely no discernable order:

Who Are The Rolling Stones? by Dana Meachen Rau  (J92 ROL)

Sanitized for your protection, this book chronicles the meteoric rise and unparalleled success, five decades later, of this author’s favorite band.  As this is a children’s book, none of the lurid details of the many (ahem) colorful incidents that earned The Stones their reputation as the bad boys of the British Invasion are present.  (Also worth reading in this engaging series of biographies for elementary and middle school-aged students:  Who Is Elton John?; Who Was Bob Marley? (to be published in June 2017);  Who Was Elvis Presley?;  Who Were The Beatles?; Who Was Michael Jackson?; and many more music-related titles.)

Jimi:  Sounds Like A Rainbow by Gary Golio and illustrated by Javaka Steptoe (J92 HEN)

A beautifully written and illustrated story of the phenomenally talented musician James Marshall Hendrix, later known to the world as Jimi, who departed this earthly realm entirely too soon at the age of 27.  His legacy lives on through his music, and his influence continues to inspire and electrify fans of all ages.

Hello, I’m Johnny Cash by G. Neri and illustrated by A.G. Ford (J 92 CASH)

Those four simple words were how this man with the deep, soulful, often otherworldly voice would start his shows after “I Walk The Line” became the number one country song in America, and the anthem for how this once dirt-poor man from Arkansas wished to live his life.  Neri captures The Man in Black’s legend in free verse, and Ford’s lush, detailed paintings of the Southern backdrop of Cash’s life make this book one that will be enjoyed by children and adults alike.

Music Lab:  We Rock!  A Fun Family Guide For Exploring Rock Music History by Jason Hanley  (J 781.6609)

If an alien landed in your bedroom one night and tasked you with teaching him/her/it about Rock & Roll, it would be fortuitous if you had this sensational book close at hand.  Written by Jason Hanley, Ph.D., education director at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, this book offers an introduction to some of the greatest songs in rock history, provides anecdotes about the artists and the social and historical events at the time the songs were written, and provides fun lab-style activities that begin with the basics of rock and move through the soul and punk genres, and then cover dance and new wave.  Best of all are the frozen-in-time photographs and the recommended set lists.  I totally have to throw the horns for this book. (Don’t know what that means?  Look it up.)

How The Beatles Changed The World by Martin W. Sandler  (J 782.4216 SAN)

When the Lads From Liverpool burst onto the music scene in the tumultuous decade known as The Sixties, they charmed and excited millions of fans the world over, and they ultimately transformed and transcended the rock genre.  This compendium of their rocketship ride to musical stardom contains hundreds of stunning photographs that capture the rich, beautiful history of The Beatles.

Legends, Icons & Rebels: Music That Changed The World by Robbie Robertson, Jim Guerinot, Sebastian Robertson and James Levine  (J 920 ROB)

Penned by 4 multitalented music industry veterans, this very cool volume would look right at home on anyone’s coffee table and includes 2 CDs with tracks from such legends as Buddy Holly, Elvis Presley, Marvin Gaye, and Hank Williams, to name just a few.  The book pays loving tribute to twenty-seven groundbreaking artists whose innovations and creations altered the music landscape for generations to come.

Strange Fruit:  Billie Holiday And The Power Of A Protest Song by Gary Golio (J 782.4216  GOL)

At the time of “Lady Day’s” death from liver and heart failure in 1959 at the age of 44, she was heralded as one of the greatest female vocalists and jazz singers of all time.  Her best-selling record and signature song “Strange Fruit” challenged the attitudes of racism in America and was an important milestone in what would become the civil rights movement.

What Was Woodstock? by Joan Holub  (J 781.6609 HOL)

Well, duh, Woodstock was the sweet little yellow bird who was Snoopy’s best friend.  Right?  Charles Schulz, creator of the “Peanuts” comic strip publicly acknowledged in several interviews during the 1970s that he named the bird after the music festival held at Max and MiriamYasgur’s farm in Bethel, New York, over three days in August of 1969.  (Artwork from the festival features a bird perched on the neck of a guitar.)  My favorite part of this clever little book is the page of “Sixties Slang.”  You dig?

Shake, Rattle & Roll:  The Founders of Rock & Roll by Holly George-Warren  (J 781.66 GEO)

A whimsically-illustrated introduction to 14 of rock & roll’s groundbreakers and earthshakers, such as Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Buddy Holly, Fats Domino, and more.  In the words of Chuck Berry:  “Hail, hail, rock & roll!”

Rock on with your bad selves, and happy reading–


As always, the opinions and viewpoints expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and in no way representative of WCPL, its employees, or their parents who may have shouted at them to “turn that infernal noise down!” at some point in their lives. To that end, you may have to speak up a bit when talking to the author, because she spent many hours next to a Marshall stack in her flaming youth, and last week.

ROAR! Fiercely Favorite Dinosaur Books for Kids

By Stacy Parish, Children’s Department

With the recent release of Jurassic World:  Fallen Kingdom, the fifth film installment in the Jurassic Park series (F CRICHTON, the book from whence it all began, just so you grownup types will know) playing in a theater near you, what better tie-in than a blog about dinosaurs for those who are too young to get in to see a PG-13 flick?

Let’s start off with two options from the fabulous Mo Willems:  Edwina, The Dinosaur Who Didn’t Know She Was Extinct (J E  WILLEMS) and Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs.  Everyone in town loves Edwina, and what’s not to love?  She makes excellent chocolate chip cookies, has spectacular fashion sense, but most of all, she is a great friend.  So when oppressive know-it-all Reginald Von Hoobie-Doobie delivers a report to his classmates on “Things That Are Extinct,” no one really listens to him . . . no one except Edwina, that is.  Hoobie-Doobie pontificated at great length as to the truth about dinosaurs, and Edwina was shocked (or “shook,” in today’s parlance.)  But you know what?  Edwina didn’t care!  And by the end of his lecture, neither did RVHD.  He was so stoked that someone finally listened to him, and was just pleased to enjoy Edwina’s friendship, along with a batch of her famous cookies.  The subtle irony of the situation, combined with Willems’ signature artwork, make this a delightful read.  Added bonus:  cameo appearances by Willems’ Pigeon and Knuffle Bunny.

Further evidence of Mo Willems’ brilliance is found in Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs (J E WILLEMS), his sly and hilarious adaptation of the classic fairy tale.  Behold:  “Once upon a time, there were three hungry Dinosaurs: Papa Dinosaur, Mama Dinosaur . . . and a Dinosaur who happened to be visiting from Norway.  One day—for no particular reason—they decided to tidy up their house, make the beds, and prepare pudding of varying temperatures. And then—for no particular reason—they decided to go . . . someplace else. They were definitely not setting a trap for some succulent, unsupervised little girl.  Definitely not!”  Hysterical, I tell you.

Here we have the perfect explanation for those trying times when you can’t find your mascara, and you are certain that you put it back in your traincase, or the crayons are inexplicably scattered across the playroom floor, and you know you stowed them neatly in their container before going to bed.  What The Dinosaurs Did Last Night:  A Very Messy Adventure by Refe and Susan Tuma  (J E  TUMA) is a whimsical and imaginative tale that will appeal to those of us who occasionally scoff at following the rules.  See also:  What The Dinosaurs Did At School by the same authors.

Rounding out the picture book category in today’s blog are the numerous How Do Dinosaurs . . . titles by Jane Yolen and Mark Teague  (J E  YOLEN).  The problem-solution formula for this series helps children and parents or caregivers navigate various situations such as anger management (How Do Dinosaurs Say I’m Mad?), personal responsibility and ownership (How Do Dinosaurs Clean Their Rooms?), social interaction (How Do Dinosaurs Play With Their Friends?) and many other scenarios.  My personal favorite in the series is How Do Dinosaurs Go To Sleep?

For those times when you need more than a cute bedtime dinosaur story and want to expand your factual knowledge of prehistoric creatures, these two nonfiction choices fit the bill perfectly.  Dinosaurs:  A Visual Encyclopedia  (J 567.9 DIN) and Ultimate Dinopedia:  The Most Complete Dinosaur Reference Ever  (J 567.903 LES)  both contain profiles of hundreds of dinosaurs, including several recently discovered dinos. 

Darling Reader, wasn’t that ever so much better than watching a bunch of ill-mannered, poison-spitting, computer-generated dinosaurs?  Happy reading!

 


As always, the opinions expressed here are solely those of the author, who wishes she had a pet pterodactyl so that she could avoid flying via commercial airlines.  Also, I want to acknowledge a T. Rex-sized assist on this blog from my awesome friend Nate of Birmingham, Alabama.

June is African-American Music Appreciation Month

By Stacy Parish, Children’s Department

Originally decreed as Black Music Month by then-president Jimmy Carter in June 1979, the designation was changed in 2009 to African-American Music Appreciation Month. In his 2016 proclamation, former president Barack Obama stated that African-American music and musicians have helped our country “ . . . to dance, to express our faith through song, to march against injustice, and to defend our country’s enduring promise of freedom and opportunity for all.” Hence, I bring to you in no particular order, a great selection of books from Williamson County Public Library Children’s Department celebrating “Lady Day’s” soaring vocals, the Motown Sound, Bob Marley’s plaintive ballads, Jimi Hendrix’s groundbreaking guitar playing, and much more.

First on the list for today’s magical musical journey is Rhythm Ride: A Road Trip Through The Motown Sound by Andrea Davis Pinkney (J 781.6440 PIN) “You ready, child? Let’s go.” Thus begins this beautifully written account of young performers who were catalysts for change in American music, and along with it, a cultural revolution. The 1960s were exciting and often turbulent times. For Berry Gordy, the man who has been largely credited with creating what would come to be known as “the Motown Sound,” it all started with an $800 loan and a vision of greatness. The year was 1959, and Gordy was on the brink of something amazing, something that would have far-reaching influence on music for decades to come. Drawing upon the talents of his family and local performers, Gordy created a record label for black musicians such as Smokey Robinson, Mary Wells, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, Martha Reeves, and Diana Ross, just to name a few. The rest, as they say, is history.

Next up on the recommended reading list for African-American Music Appreciation Month is Jimi: Sounds Like A Rainbow written by Gary Golio and illustrated by Javaka Steptoe (J 92 HENDRIX).   A stylishly written and illustrated story of the phenomenally talented James Marshall Hendrix, known to the world as Jimi, who departed this earth at the way-too-soon age of 27. His legacy lives on decades later, and his groundbreaking music continues to inspire and electrify fans of all ages.

Strange Fruit: Billie Holiday And The Power Of A Protest Song by Gary Golio (J 782.4216 GOL). At the time of her death from liver and heart failure in 1959 at the age of 44, Billie Holiday (nee Eleanora Fagan) was heralded as one of the greatest female vocalists and jazz singers of all time. Her best-selling record and signature song “Strange Fruit” challenged the attitudes of racism in America and was an important milestone in what would become the American civil rights movement.

No reading list about African-American music would be complete without mention of the excellent books about black musicians in the “Who Is/Who Was?” series, which features titles such as Who was Bob Marley? (J 92 MAR), Who Was Louis Armstrong? (J 92 ARM), Who Was Stevie Wonder? (J 92 WON), and Who Was Michael Jackson? (J 92 JAC). The books in this series feature whimsical illustrations and side notes about the subject, and are so much fun to read . Check ‘em out! (OK, that’s my one and only pun for this blog, I swear.)

                   

Trombone Shorty by Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews (J 788.9316 AND) is a delightful, picturesque story of how a talented young boy from New Orleans didn’t always have the money to buy an instrument, but he did have the dream to play music. Plucked from a crowd by none other than the legendary Bo Diddley and allowed to play his trombone on stage, he was then inspired to form his own band. Today, Andrews is a frequent performer at the annual New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, the place where he got his first break.

Last but not least on my list of recommendations is Bob Marley: The Life Of A Musical Legend by Gary Jeffrey (J 92 MARLEY). Part biography, part graphic novel, this very cool book celebrates famed Jamaican musician Bob Marley. His body ravaged by cancer, Marley departed this earthly realm at the young age of 36, but his music and his message of peace continues to inspire people all over the world.


As always, the opinions expressed in this blog are those of the author alone, and not representative of any other WCPL employees. Ms. Parish can occasionally be overheard quoting Jimi Hendrix’s lyrics and belting out “Voodoo Chile,” but only when she’s home alone or behind the wheel of her car.

Words and Music by . . .

By Stacy Parish, Children’s Department

On more than one occasion, usually to no discernible effect whatsoever, I’ve admonished my own children as well as library patrons for seeing the movie before they read the book.  I can’t do that with the  titles in this blog, for the simple reason that a different medium preceded the book; to wit, this is a list of children’s books that were inspired by rock, pop, or folk songs.  Turn it up, y’all . . .

It was immediately clear to me which book/song I wanted to start this blog with, for a couple of reasons.  Bob Marley, the enigmatic and often misunderstood Jamaican singer-songwriter who achieved international acclaim before his untimely death from cancer at the age of 36, has long held a spot in my heart.  His daughter Cedella has written five books to date, all based upon or inspired by her iconic father’s life and music.  One Love and Every Little Thing (J E MARLEY) are both delightfully inspirational, and emphasize how one person can make a difference in this world, and that of course “every little thing is gonna be alright.”

Next up on my songs-to-books list is another transformative song that was also written and published in an era of revolution, war, and enormous historical and cultural changes to the American landscape.  “What A Wonderful World,” written by Bob Thiele and George David Weiss and recorded by Louis Armstrong, was not initially a hit in the United States; it sold fewer than 1,000 copies because the president of ABC Records did not like the song and therefore did not promote it, but was a major success in the United Kingdom, reaching number one on the UK Singles Chart in 1967.  The eponymous children’s book illustrated by Tim Hopgood (J E HOPGOOD) is just as sweet, hopeful, and uplifting as the song.  (Author’s note:  my very favorite writer of books for grownups, Michael Connelly, takes inspiration from this song for his complex protagonist Harry Bosch, and his next novel is entitled Dark Sacred Night, which is of course a line from this beautiful song.)

The brave and persistent Itsy Bitsy Spider from the children’s finger-play nursery rhyme is back, and on an even bolder adventure in this charming book written and illustrated by Iza Trapani (J E TRAPANI).  She manages to survive encounters with a fan, a mouse, a rocking chair, a cat, and a gigantic maple tree, and is finally able to build her web and relax.  Trapani’s rich watercolor illustrations and playful rhythm transform this simple song into a delightful journey to be enjoyed again and again.

Also from the fabulous Iza Trapani is her brilliantly illustrated Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star (J E Trapani).  While we have several different versions of the song-to-book rendition of this sweet little song, Iza’s is far and away the best of the bunch.  (Pete the Cat’s version comes in second, because I love him so.)  Just as in Itsy Bitsy Spider, this modern spin on the traditional classic will yield many hours of reading pleasure.

Last on this list is Puff, the Magic Dragon (J E YARROW) by Peter Yarrow, an American singer-songwriter who was one-third of the 1960s folk trio Peter, Paul and Mary.  Yarrow once said, “Puff has appeared to me both childlike and wise, a king but also a willing follower of just about any bright spirit that inspired him. Puff gives his whole heart and soul to one special friend…One day, as you can see at the end of this book, a new and special friend comes to Honalee…In this way Puff and Jackie’s friendship continues through new children like you.”   Both Yarrow and co-writer Leonard Lipton have adamantly and repeatedly stated that “Puff the Magic Dragon is not about drugs.”  He has also said of the song that it “never had any meaning other than the obvious one” and is about the “loss of innocence in children,” and dismissed the suggestion of association with drugs as “sloppy research.”  So, disregard that urban legend.  The book is comprised solely of the lyrics to the song with no additional text, but the lush illustrations imply a new twist to the sad final stanza.

Come visit the rock star librarians at WCPL to check out these and many more music-related titles to enjoy during our Summer Reading Program—which is not coincidentally themed “Libraries Rock!”  Happy Reading—


Librarian by day, aspiring fiction writer by night, and enthusiast of rock and roll 24/7/365, the author lives with her two children and four cats, not all of whom share her taste in music.

“LOL Books”

By Chelsea Bennett, Reference Department

April was National Humor Month. (Remember our April Fool’s Day Prank?) To celebrate, we put together a great selection of books – both fiction and nonfiction – that fit the theme. In case you missed it, we’re sharing that book list here. We hope you’ll find a book to make you laugh all year long!

  • Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh, (792.7028092 BRO)
  • Yes, Please by Amy Poehler, (92 POEHLER)
  • Life’s a Stitch: the Best of Contemporary Women’s Humor by Anne Safran Dalin, ed., (817.608 LIF)
  • Running with Scissors by Augusten Burroughs, (92 BURROUGHS)
  • The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an America in Britain by Bill Bryson, (914.1048612 BRY)
  • In Such Good Company: 11 Years of Laughter, Mayhem, and Fun in the Sandbox by Carol Burnett, (791.4572 BUR)
  • Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ’s Childhood Pal by Christopher Moore, (F MOO)
  • Walking Across Egypt by Clyde Edgerton, (F EDG)
  • Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris, (814.54 SED)
  • This Is a Book by Demetri Martin, 817.6 MAR
  • The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, (F ADA)
  • Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency by Douglas Adams, (F ADA)
  • I Could Pee on This: and Other Poems by Cats by Francesco Marciuliano, (811.6 MAR)
  • Being Dead Is No Excuse: the Official Southern Ladies’ Guide to Hosting the Perfect Funeral by Gayden Metcalfe, (393.097633 MET)
  • Reasons My Kid Is Crying by Greg Pembroke, (818.5407 PEM)
  • Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding, (F FIE)
  • The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl by Issa Rae, (92 RAE)
  • The Big Over Easy by Jasper Fforde, (F FFO)
  • The Eyre Affaire by Jasper Fforde, (F FFO)
  • Dad Is Fat by Jim Gaffigan, (814.6 GAF)
  • How to Be Alone by Jonathan Franzen, (814.54 FRA)
  • Texts from Jane Eyre by Mallory Ortberg, (818.602 ORT)
  • The Innocents Abroad by Mark Twain, (914.04286 TWA)
  • Gentlemen of the Road by Michael Chabon, (F CHA)
  • Why Not Me? by Mindy Kaling, (92 KALING)
  • High Fidelity by Nick Hornby, F HOR
  • I Feel Bad About My Neck: and Other Thoughts on Being a Woman by Nora Ephron, (814.54 EPH)
  • I Remember Nothing: and Other Reflections by Nora Ephron, (817.54 EPH)
  • The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table by Oliver Wendell Holmes, (814.3 HOL)
  • The Code of the Woosters by P. G. Wodehouse, (F WOD)
  • Holidays in Heck by P. J. O’Rourke, (818.5402 ORO)
  • How to Make Your Baby an Internet Celebrity by Rick Chillot, (818 CHI)
  • Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons, (F GIB)
  • I Am America (And so Can You!) by Stephen Colbert, (818 COL)
  • Midnight Confessions by Stephen Colbert, (818.602 COL)
  • Maskerade: a Novel of Discworld by Terry Pratchett, (F PRA)
  • Bossypants by Tina Fey, (92 FEY)
  • Half Asleep in Frog Pajamas by Tom Robbins, (F ROB)
  • Night Thoughts by Wallace Shawn, (814.54 SHA)
  • The Princess Bride by William Goldman, (F GOL)
  • The Bear Went over the Mountain by William Kotzwinkle, (F KOT)
  • White Teeth by Zadie Smith, (F SMI)

Discover the World of Urban Fantasy

By Chelsea Bennett, Reference Department

“The Dresden Files” by Mika-Blackfield

Being a lover of memoir and “the classics” (think, “books you were forced to read in high school”), I’ve felt comfortable referring to those categories in previous blog posts. But when I saw the colorful genre bookmarks we have at the library – check them out on your next visit!–, I felt inspired to explore some authors I’ve never read before.

One genre I’m pretty unfamiliar with is Urban Fantasy, so I thought I’d start there, and every research trip begins with a visit to Wikipedia, doesn’t it (just don’t tell your teachers)? From there, I gathered these elements of the Urban Fantasy subgenre (1):

  • A primarily real-world, urban setting, in the past, present or future
  • Earthbound mythological creatures (sometimes)
  • Coexistence / conflict between humans and paranormal beings (some other times)
  • Often explores how city life changes after the discovery of magic
  • Does not rely primarily on a romantic plot (as distinct from Paranormal Romance subgenre)

This sounds like many of the bestsellers and blockbusters in the past couple of decades! So who are the storytellers behind this enduring pop culture phenomenon?

“Neil Gaiman’s American Gods Fan Art” by AnamikaB

Even I, in my ignorance, recognize the name Neil Gaiman halfway down the list on the bright yellow bookmark before me. His novel, American Gods, is a prime example of the genre. In it, Gaiman posits that “gods and mythological creatures exist because people believe in them.” (2) Therefore, in modern America, new gods – representing media, the internet, and the stock market, among others – have more authority than the old gods brought over by immigrants; and fantastical creatures hold commonplace occupations. But a mysterious man wishes to shake things up, and he needs the help of ex-con Shadow to rouse ancient powers. A strange, epic journey, with elements of horror, fantasy, and magical realism, this award-winning novel has an international fan base.

Neil Gaiman, and indeed the genre of Urban Fantasy, would not be where they are today without Terri Windling. She created the Bordertown universe, tales of which have been written by a multitude of authors. Bordertown is “a dystopian metropolis that lies along the border between “the Elflands” and “The World”.” (3) The tagline on some of the book covers reads, “Where Magic Meets Rock ‘n’ Roll,” which I find charming. As one reader puts it, “the aesthetic of Celtic punk rock, elf/human gang warfare, and glamorous urban decay absolutely succeeds. You can understand why this series inspired its own new wave/nerd subculture back in the eighties.” (4)

Mercy Thompson

Interestingly, 57% of writers in this genre are women. (1) Another such writer who caught my eye was Patricia Briggs, with her Mercy Thompson series. Mercy is a shapeshifting mechanic who was raised by werewolves. She interacts with vampires, gremlins, and other creatures of the night. Ignore the sexy artwork on the book covers: this is not a steamy series, but rather one with compelling dialogue and a strong, sensitive female lead. There are plenty of books in this series, starting with Moon Called.

I’d like to leave you with some more author recommendations, which is a hard thing to do as I haven’t actually read any of them. But thank goodness for those bookmarks, and for Goodreads.com, a great resource for book lists and reader reviews. Searching Goodreads by genre, I found that there are some Urban Fantasy authors whose books have been reviewed by community members hundreds of thousands of times! (Side note: If you find a reviewer whose taste matches your own, you can follow him/her on the site. It’s like having your own personal book critic who delivers tailored book recommendations.)

  • Charlaine HarrisSookie Stackhouse series (AKA the Southern Vampire Mysteries). These books are the source material for HBO’s True Blood.
  • Jim ButcherThe Dresden Files Harry Dresden is Chicago’s first and only wizard P.I. This series is the Urban Fantasy high standard for many reviewers.
  • Kelley ArmstrongDarkest Powers A genetically-engineered teenage necromancer’s powers are out of control: she raises the dead without even trying. On the run from her creators, she’s accompanied by a sorcerer, a werewolf, and a witch.
  • Seanan McGuireWayward Children Children who have gone through magical portals – like Wonderland’s rabbit hole, or Narnia’s wardrobe – find it hard to adjust to normal life once they return. Luckily, there’s a home just for them.
  • Kevin HearneThe Iron Druid Chronicles. The last of the druids runs a bookshop in Arizona, but that won’t throw an angry god off the trail of his magic sword. Celtic mythology meets vampires, werewolves, and Thor. Yes, this series definitely has a silly edge to it, but reviewers say it’s a lot of fun!
  • Holly BlackThe Poison Eaters and Other Stories. Elves, werewolves, vampires, faeries: whatever your creature obsession, there’s a short story for you in this YA/adult collection from the author of popular middle-grade series The Spiderwick Chronicles.
  • Terry BrooksWord & Void There’s been a long strike in a steel town, and it’s the hottest Fourth of July on record. Into this volatile atmosphere come a knight of the Word and a demonic servant of the Void, whose opposing goals are mysteriously linked by a teenage girl. The fate of humanity is to be decided amidst the fireworks that celebrate freedom.
  • Ilona AndrewsKate Daniels Magic feeds on technology, creating a chaotic backdrop for tales of a mercenary who lives in Atlanta, cleaning up paranormal problems.

I plan to broaden my literary horizons by adding a couple of these to my reading list. If I abandon my classics and only ever write about Urban Fantasy from now on, you’ll know what triggered it!


Sources:

Art

%d bloggers like this: