Category Archives: About Us

WCPLS Branches Reopen with Modifications to Hours and Services

book reader with  face mask
Book Reader with Face Mask

As of June 15, 2020 the Williamson County Public Library will be open for limited hours. Patrons may enter their Library Branches in Franklin, Fairview, and Nolensville Monday-Friday from 10-6 and on Saturday from 10-1. Our Bethesda and Leiper’s Fork Branches are open Tuesday-Friday from 11-6 and on Saturday from 10-1.

Our College Grove Branch will not reopen and only offer Holds-2-Go.

Holds-2-Go curbside service  has been implemented at all Library Branches. It is offered at the Main Library in Franklin, Fairview and Nolensville from 9-10, Monday to Saturday. Bethesda and Leiper’s Fork Branches offer it from 10-11, Tuesday to Friday, and  9-10 on Saturdays.

Learn more about Holds-2-Go

All patrons will have their temperatures checked with a touchless thermometer and be asked five health questions by staff before they can enter their Library Branch.  Patronage at the Main Library will be limited to 50 people per hour to ensure the ability to social distance while inside.  It is required that patrons wear a face mask in the facility until all social distancing safety measures are installed.  Some areas of the Main Library will have a smaller occupancy level due to the size of the space. 

Library patrons will have access to all public areas of the facility excluding the meeting room and Williamson Room.  It is recommended that visitors look online for their materials so they can quickly locate and borrow them.  Visits should be limited to one hour or less so that others may enter the facility.

Other changes include:

  • Patrons will exit via the Main Library Entrance and must enter via the Meeting Room to be screened by staff prior to their visit.
  • Directional signage for moving about the Library is posted on shelves and other areas.
  • Library staff are wearing face coverings.
  • Plexiglass has been installed at service desks to ensure the safety of patrons and staff.
  • 6 foot distance markers are on the floor at the service desks.
  • Staff will look up materials and provide call numbers for the public. Patrons may look for the books themselves or stay at the service while staff retrieve the materials.
  • 6-8 computers are available in the reference area for one hour increments.  Call 615-595-1243 to schedule a time. 
  • There will be a cleaning of high touch areas every two hours. 
  • Seating has been reduced to allow for social distancing.
  • Suspension of face to face services such as story times, exam proctoring, notary service, and one-on-one assistance at the computers.  Please visit the website to see what services have moved online at http://wcpltn.org
  • The train table in the Children’s Department and other interactive activities have been stored away for the time being.
  • AWE stations in the Children’s Department will be unavailable. 
  • Food and drink are not allowed in the facility anywhere.
  • Returned items must be deposited in the outside book drop. Patrons can call 615-595-1277 to make an appointment to facilitate the return of items that cannot be put in the book drop.  
  • Water fountains are unavailable.

All materials will be available and patrons should take appropriate precautions in handling items. We ask that all handled library material be left out for staff to pick up, along with all returned library items, they will be quarantined for three days prior to their return to the shelf.  

Magazines and newspapers will not be quarantined.  It is recommended that patrons use gloves in handling those items. The Library does not have gloves to provide.  It is recommended that patrons looking for magazines utilize the free Flipster  app and the Tennessee READS apps, Overdrive and Libby.  Flipster and READS can also be enjoyed on a computer.

Please visit our website for up-to-date information. The Williamson County Public Library System will continue to expand digital offerings such as virtual Facetime Live Story Times and digital Reference appointments.  Updates are also available by subscribing to your Branch’s online newsletter, https://www.wcpltn.org/277/Newsletter-Sign-Up, and by following WCPLtn on Twitter and Facebook.  Further announcements regarding changes of hours and in services will be made via these channels.

Libby, by Overdrive: a new app for your library experience

By Chelsea Bennett, Reference Department

As a library card holder, you already know that you have access to a vast collection of books, periodicals, movies, and audiobooks at the Williamson County Public Library (not to mention all the other fantastic resources the library provides for the community). But here’s what you may not know: if you also have a smartphone, tablet, computer, or eReader, you can easily gain access to your library’s digital collections of eBooks, audiobooks, magazines, and more. It’s like discovering a new wing of your favorite library, full of additional content. And the digital collections are available around the clock!

At WCPL, we give you access to these vast, additional resources through various apps, which you can read about on this page (http://lib.williamson-tn.org/e_library). One popular collection is known as Tennessee R.E.A.D.S. Previously, the books and audio in this collection were accessible only through the Overdrive app. Now, Overdrive has released a second app called Libby.

Libby has much of the functionality of the original Overdrive app, such as checking out eBooks and audiobooks, placing holds, and sending to Kindle. Some library patrons have already made the switch to this new app, with no looking back. But there are some differences between the two to be aware of before you dive in. Let’s look at how Overdrive and Libby compare, so you can decide which one might be best for you.

Why Libby?

Designed to be simple, attractive, and user-friendly, Libby makes it easy to get started downloading eBooks and audiobooks right away. This is the feedback I read over and over, from novice and experienced users alike: Libby is so easy to use! If you have never used either app before, I would recommend you start with Libby, because of its easy setup.

Libby makes managing multiple library accounts painless, whether you have a library card in another library system (for example, Davidson or Maury county), or even a household member’s card you’d like to add. All checked-out materials live on the same “shelf” within the app, streamlining the way you access your digital loans.

With Libby, you can download eBooks and audiobooks for offline access. If you’re online, you can stream the audiobooks instead, which saves space on your device. Libby will also deliver eBooks to a Kindle, if you prefer.

Since Libby is a new app, new features are being added all the time. Just this month, the developers added new search features. For example, you can now search by the title of a series, instead of the names of the books within the series, which sounds very helpful! If you give Libby a try, be sure to keep it updated regularly. That way, you won’t miss out on any added capabilities.

Why Overdrive?

As is often the case with technology, we sometimes have to choose between something that’s feature-heavy and something that’s easy to use. That’s the case when it comes to Overdrive and Libby.

It’s important to know that, right now, Overdrive has better accessibility support than Libby. Libby currently lacks support for text-to-speech, voiceover, and multiple languages. Overdrive also has more amenities for the visually impaired. However, many of these features are planned for Libby’s future updates.

Overdrive gives you better control when it comes to searching content. You can exclude mature content from your searches, or set your searches to show only children’s books. This is not possible in Libby.

If you use Overdrive’s “Wish list” function, stick with it for now. You can “tag” books in Libby, but you cannot import your Overdrive Wish list to Libby.

With Overdrive, you can stream videos from your library’s collection. You can also access checked-out material through your computer’s web browser. Neither feature is planned for Libby.

If you’d like to read more about Libby, you will find some helpful links at the bottom of this article. They include the official getting started guide, a great FAQ page, and an accessibility review.

I bet you will find Libby easy to set up, and a pleasure to use. Remember, if you get stuck, you can always come in to the Reference department for help. Enjoy!

Helpful Links

That’s Right, We Have Art in the Library!

Kindness Takes Flight birds created by visual arts students at Williamson County high schools

By Lance Hickerson, Reference Department

Williamson County is home to many artists whose creative efforts enrich our land. We naturally think of musicians (Music City everyone), but not to be overlooked are the many who spend their greatest efforts creating visual art. The library offers two areas where visual artists are able to display their works for a month at a time. These are the Meeting Room Gallery Hall and the Grid Row of the Rotunda, both on the first floor as patrons enter the library. Our local artists showcase a wide range of art media to the delight of many visitors. Just last year alone the library recorded 465,445 patron visits. That’s a lot of exposure for those looking to share or create awareness of their work.

When visiting the library, why not take a moment to enjoy the many creative visual expressions on hand? If you are an artist, why not share your work with our patrons by a display at the library? The Grid Row Gallery is sponsored by the Arts Council of Williamson County, but local artists in all media are invited to exhibit their work in the Meeting Room Gallery. The exhibits change monthly and there is a waiting list, but that just means that you have time to get your art display together. For information about exhibiting their own works, artists should call (615)595-1250, ext. 1.

The varieties of art displayed over the last two years include watercolor, acrylic, and oil paintings of many subjects involving landscapes, portraits, still life, and the surreal. There are ceramics, mosaics, art masks, as well as many interesting fine-art photographs. Samples from each month’s artist on display are penned to the library’s pinterest page under Art@WCPLtn.

A representative sample from the last few years of exhibits is shown in the photographs included here.

Janet R Petrell

Carol Curtis

Sketch Bourque

Nell Vaughn Henderson

Together Ministries

Lindsay Castor

Robbie Lask

Christine Parachek Marshall

Sketch Bourque

Ann Light

Quilt by Joyce Oberle

John Rinker

Jen Vogus

Heritage Display March 2017

By Rebecca Tischler, Reference Department

Last Month, we had an interactive display upstairs. Patrons could add their ancestry to a world map and see where some of their neighbors came from as well.  Some had many ancestries, and some only had one, but it was interesting to see how diverse our patrons were.

And those who didn’t know their background, we pointed them to the Special Collections department, where patrons can get some help doing genealogical research with databases such as Ancestry.com and HeritageQuest.  If you want to know more about where your family comes from, ask one of our wonderful Special Collections Librarians for help.

But for now, take a look at all the responses that were left at the display.

  1. English, Welsh, Polish, German, French, Scandinavian, Scottish
  2. Welsh
  3. Greek, English
  4. Snowbeast (AKA Canadian)
  5. Venezuela
  6. Indian
  7. Hispanic
  8. British
  9. Tamil, Hindi
  10. Prussia, Austria, Germany
  11. Italy, Germany
  12. Norwegian, German
  13. African American, German
  14. German, Prussian, Polish
  15. Scottish
  16. Thai
  17. English, Welsh, Italian
  18. Tamil, Hindi
  19. Alien
  20. Chinese
  21. China
  22. English, Scottish, Norman French
  23. Mongolia
  24. French, Great Britain
  25. German
  26. Brazilian
  27. Mexican, Spanish
  28. Mexican
  29. French, Mexican
  30. Italy, Germany, Europe
  31. English, Irish
  32. German, French, Irish
  33. Cuba
  34. Armenian
  35. Scottish, English, French
  36. Swedish, German
  37. Deutschland
  38. Swiss-German, English
  39. French, Irish
  40. Polish, English, Irish
  41. China
  42. Chinese, Hunan
  43. Thai, Chinese
  44. German, Swiss
  45. Antarctican
  46. Kiwi
  47. Canadian
  48. Pennsylvania Dutch
  49. Ireland, Germany
  50. Guatemala
  51. At this library we found out the Hill family from Texas is the Hill family from ESSEX U.K.!
  52. Irish, Italian
  53. Norwegian, Icelandic
  54. Czech, Dutch, German, English
  55. Norwegian, French, Polish
  56. Brazilian, Italian, Irish, English
  57. Irish, German
  58. Mexican
  59. Tartar Kazakhstan
  60. Italy
  61. Swedish, English, Scottish, Irish
  62. Scottish, Scandinavian, Polynesian, German
  63. Mexicana Latin of African and Spanish ancestry
  64. Venezuela, Peru
  65. Black, Irish, Blackfoot
  66. Balkar
  67. Cherokee, English, French, Scottish, Irish, German, Swiss, Nordic
  68. Germany
  69. Mexico
  70. Mexican
  71. Spanish, Mexican
  72. Columbian
  73. Portuguese, Spanish, Brazilian
  74. Mexican
  75. Indian, German, Dutch, English
  76. Italy
  77. Syrian
  78. European
  79. Vietnamese
  80. Anglo-Irish, German-Polish
  81. Scottish, Welsh, English
  82. Spanish, Scottish, French, Polish, Welsh, Irish
  83. Haitian
  84. Irish, Cherokee
  85. Spanish, Italian, Greek, English, Scottish, Irish, Moroccan
  86. Indian, Irish, German, English
  87. German, English, Irish, Dutch
  88. Spanish, Scottish, Irish, English, Danish, German, French, Ecuadorian, Incan
  89. Ghanaian, Haitian
  90. German, Irish, Scottish
  91. English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh, French, Swiss German, Cherokee
  92. Haiti
  93. Celts, France, Ireland, England/Wales
  94. French, Scottish, Cherokee
  95. Canadian
  96. Italian

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Contact Information


1314 Columbia Ave., Franklin TN 37064
P: (615) 595-1243 F: (615) 595-1245
Email: ref@ailliamson-tn.org
Hours: M-Th 9-8, F&S 9-5:30 Sun 1-5:30
http://lib.williamson-tn.org/

Academy Park Press


About Academy Park Press



For UPDATES from the Academy Park Press, click HERE.

Or go to the ACADEMY PARK PRESS PAGE for more information.


Academy Park Press Logo

The Williamson County Public Library is pleased to announce its newest venture, Academy Park Press, a publishing imprint with the ability to empower our arts community by providing truly worldwide exposure. Utilizing innovative new design and publishing software, Academy Park Press will offer authors a low-cost solution to distributing their work utilizing iBook and EPUB formats.

Academy Park Press will seek to publish between four and eight original works in its initial year of operation. In addition to assisting selected authors with design, layout, and marketing of works, the imprint will provide ISBN numbers and the tools to necessary to create a fully optimized iBook, EPUB, or print publication.

Digital publishing has seen rapid growth in the past year thanks to easily accessible programs and the freedom it offers authors. This new movement has enabled a new wave of creative people to distribute their original work by providing a way to publish and set prices without the aid of a major publishing house.

Williamson County is a community filled with both aspiring and well known writers and artists. Academy Park Press eliminates traditional barriers to the publishing world, providing a platform for original works of art, literature, and poetry. By creating our own content, the Library circumvents the traditional limitations imposed by the publishing industry, while at the same time creating a voice for a new ensemble of published authors.

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History of the Library


Our History


40's flierThe history of the Williamson County Public Library and its presence in Franklin dates back to the 1920’s. It began with a few books donated to the local American Legion in Franklin, in the Masonic Hall on 2nd Avenue in downtown. By 1936, the Legion and the Professional Women’s Club raised enough money to have a one year experiment full time library, which opened on June 26, 1936 in the back of the old Post Hotel on the public square. The “experiment” was so successful that within 6 months it was decided to have a permanent library in Franklin, and the Williamson County Public Library was born.

By 1938, the library was able to hire its first full time librarian, and in 1939, needing more space, the library moved to the Old Bank Building on the west side of the Public Square. With World War II came a change of name, and the Library became the War Memorial Public Library. By 1949, the library had again outgrown its space, and moved to the German House on Fifth Avenue and Fair Street. The library became part of the regional library system in the 1960’s, and in the 70’s began opening braches – at Fairview and Brentwood. By the late 1970’s the library had once again outgrown it space, and a new facility was built at Five Points on the site where the Franklin Elementary School had burned in 1962. In the 1990’s the library became a County institution and the name was changed back to the Williamson County Public Library – but had once again outgrown its space by 2000. In 2003, the Library moved to its current home on Columbia Ave.

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