Blog Archives

My Book Pile…

I like to read a variety of things.  I am partial to science fiction, urban fantasy, and horror novels and any mixes thereof.  Romance novels do intrigue me but I haven’t read as much of them lately.  I do like to read adult graphic novels too.  I do read some nonfiction – management and leadership plus popular or recommended books to me by other staff.  Teen novels are something I enjoy too because of the tightly told stories that pack such an emotional impact plus they can be read quickly (or maybe that’s just me).  I also frequently will sneak down to the Children’s Department and read some of the new picture books for the same reason plus the artwork is so varied and delightful.

Some authors I like are Orson Scott Card, Patricia Briggs, Dean Koontz, Stephen King, Josh Malerman, Kelley Armstrong and Sarah Addison Allen.  Of course, there are many others.

Books I have recently read:

Stack of Library Books mentioned in blog post

Harleen by Stjepan Sejic (don’t ask me to say it) – a graphic novel that is an origin story for Harley Quinn from the Batman universe.  An excellent read with extra details in the artwork which I love and makes it fun to go back through and look for.   I’m currently reading Birds of Prey: Harley which offers a different origin story and different artwork, more bubbly whereas the other novel is darker in tone and illustration.

Lost and Found by Orson Scott Card – fiction novel about a young man with the knack for finding things and returning them to their owners. Obviously that would have some drawbacks with accusations of theft and suspicions.  I really enjoyed it and cried a little at the end, not that it was sad-sad but touching.

The Furies by Katie Lowe – fiction novel about a group of girls in a private school. Quite dark in a way that made me think of Gone Girl.  It left me feeling like I had just driven slowly past a car wreck. Not that it was bad, I couldn’t stop reading it.

I am currently reading Dean Koontz’s Devoted.  I’m a sucker for his books with the golden retrievers.  I remember reading his novel Watchers as a teenage and have devoured his books ever since.

~Jeffie

Tuesday Book Brunch First Meeting!

Tues Book Brunch
Grab your coffee or tea and let’s settle down to talk about what books we are reading. This is an informal book chat where we talk and share about the books we are reading. All readers are welcome (just not too many at once), print or audio.
Registration is required and limited to 15 readers so click the ticket link to go to the sign up page. I need an email to send you the link to join the meeting.
You will need a computer with a mic and hopefully a camera (we don’t judge and don’t care if you have pants.) We’ll have a waiting list and can spin off another group.
As this is our first meeting, the meeting will be with the staffer calling on each attendee in turn to introduce themself, talk briefly about what they like to read and share about a book that they are currently reading. Everyone will get 5 minutes which puts the meeting at 45 minutes more or less so plan on hanging out online for about an hour. We can see how it goes after we’ve all tried muting and unmuting our mics (no judging! We can do better than Congress, right?).
Participants will get an email with the link to join on Monday, May 11 by 1p.

New Online Story Times

Missing story time?  We miss you too.  We are sharing some of our favorite read-aloud stories on the Williamson County WCTV YouTube channel.

Library Director, Dolores Greenwald, loves Pete the Cat.  Here she shares one of the stories from the popular picture book series: https://youtu.be/TlfHSM8jlUk

Youth Services Manager, Ms. Stephanie, shares a story she loves: https://youtu.be/_CCy5jzdO4g

Children’s Librarian, Miz Liz, shares one of her favorite stories:  https://youtu.be/6YmrjmtCuQ8

Children’s Librarian, Ms. Barbara, sings Old McDonald had a Farm but there is a surprising twist to this classic: https://youtu.be/Ek8iwDjjRTw

Ms. Stephanie is back with Llama Llama, Red Pajama: https://youtu.be/gAxpSOZui_A

And more to come!

Stuck at Home? Here’s Free Online Media to Binge from the Library

By Amy Shropshire

 

While the Williamson County Public Library is currently closed to the public, fighting off the spread of COVID-19, several changes have been made to the existing library policy.

  • We are no longer circulating physical materials. Patrons will no longer be able to place or pick up holds. Holds that have already been placed will be held for when we re-open and not expire.
  • No late fees will be assessed for materials currently checked out. Materials are still currently returnable through the book drop, but keeping them will not incur any fees until after we re-open to the public.
  • Patrons with recently expired cards, or cards expiring soon, have all been renewed until June 2020.
  • Fines will no longer be an impediment to accessing online resources. All patrons with an active and renewed library card should be able to access online materials such as Tennessee READS and Hoopla.
  • At present, staff will return calls and emails for patrons having technical difficulty accessing online resources and/or help answer queries.

So many people at home will need resources for both education and entertainment value, and we can still provide these resources through online media.

Here are some important things to remember when creating an account through our online resources.

  • We are part of Buffalo River Regional Library, so that will be the name you search for when creating an account.
  • The default PIN number is the last 4 digits of the library card number.
  • All library card numbers must be entered with no spaces to access online resources.

For example, Tennessee READS is a great online resource that offers over 100,000 e-books and audiobooks available to our patrons. You can download e-books and audiobooks to a computer, mobile device, and/or tablet. You can access Tennessee READS by downloading the apps, Overdrive and Libby, or you can access it through the library website.

 

 

Hoopla is another great resource if you are looking for more audio-visual media such as music, movies, and television shows. Not to mention Hoopla also has a comic book selection as well. Just remember to select carefully, because Hoopla is limited to 3 checkouts per month.

Another perk about Overdrive, Libby, and Hoopla are the accessibility features, which include:

  • dyslexic font
  • adjustable font size
  • adjustable audio speed
  • Hoopla has closed captioning

RBDigital also carries a variety of popular e-books and audiobooks if you can’t find something in Tennessee READS or if you run out of checkouts.

If you are looking for magazines, try Flipster! Flipster is an easy-to-use digital magazine newsstand that has new and back issues. Flipster is accessible via a web browser or the Flipster app which is made specifically for Apple devices, Android devices, and the Kindle Fire tablet. You can also download magazines to read offline, anytime, anywhere.

For something new and different, try the curated lists of the Indie Author Project. Published by Library Journal, the India Author Project pulls together lists by genre of the most talked about independently published work that often escapes notice. You might find your new favorite author there.

Whether you’re keeping up with your educational goals of if you’re wanting to learn something new, EBSCOhost is the online resource for you. EBSCOhost provides a plethora of materials from classics to educational nonfiction. Try our collection of EBSCOhost e-books and audiobooks available for checkout.

Speaking of educational resources, we have computer practice resources and databases full of new learning opportunities you can spend your time on. For example, GCFLearnFree has plenty of tutorials including basic money management, resume writing, computer skills, and technology help to name a few. GCFLearnFree also provides courses on communication skills and the sharing economy too. Feel free to browse their collection of tutorials as well as our other computer training options.

Staying at home is also a great time to finally publish that book you’ve always wanted to write, and we have the resources for that! Create your own independently published book through Pressbooks, and submit your work to the Indie Author Project, both of which make your work shareable.

While some of us may be stuck at home for public safety, this is the perfect opportunity to do the things you’ve never had time to do before. So stay home and read, learn, and create!

 

Additional Links:

Overdrive app for Android devices

Overdrive app for Apple devices

Libby app for Android devices

Libby app for Apple devices

 

You’re invited to Boo Books with Friends

book books 2019.png

Young ones and their families are invited to come trick-or-treat with the Friends of the Library. Costumes will be admired but are not required!

Activities will be in the Children’s Department on the first floor.

Call 615-595-1244 for more information.

How to Teach Your Baby to Read by Glenn and Janet Doman

babyBy Liz Arrambide, Children’s Librarian

Occasionally families ask us what books do we have to teach very young children how to read. Most of the books we carry are designed for older children. Megan Sheridan has written an excellent article on this blog explaining fun ways to teach basic early literacy skills.

For families that want to teach their young children (under age six) how to read there is an excellent book: “How to Teach Your Baby to Read: the gentle revolution” by Glenn Doman and Janet Doman. Glenn Doman and his research team started in the 1950’s to see what they could do to help children with brain injuries increase their capacity to learn. The researchers learned that their methods helped the children to learn to read. They were surprised to find that a brain damaged child could read at ages three and four when their peers could not.

The institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential began to theorize that very young children seem to be learning differently than children who are six years or older. A child learns language by being shown an object and then being told the name of the object. The team experimented and found that this type of learning can be extended to teaching a child to read. Very young children can learn that the sound ”ball”, a physical ball and the word “ball” all mean the same thing. Their in-depth research showed that this facility of the brain disappears at age six.

As a young mother, I was intrigued with this book. I tried their methods with my then two and half year old child. We had a lot of fun and she learned to read really well. When she started Kindergarten, she tested at a third grade reading level. I’ve tutored others in reading since then. It was much easier for my daughter to learn to read using this method. She didn’t have to be taught about “consonant blends” or the “er” sound etc. She didn’t go through these stages. For interested families, this revised edition offers a fun and easy way to teach very young children to read.

Supporting School Age Children and their Reading at Williamson County Public Library Children’s Section

By Liz Arrambide, Children’s Librarian

Frequently Asked Questions

What resources are available at the library to help my children find books that they can read?

Answer: We have lists available in the Children’s Section that are some of our favorite books for different grade levels. Feel free to ask us where they are. These are also available on our website. Click on our Kids page. On the right you’ll see “Let’s Read Books Lists”. This will link you to lists of books by grade level.

My child is reading at a specific reading level. How can I find books with that reading level and are your books color codes by reading level?

Answer: Many schools use Accelerated Reader (AR) reading levels. The child takes a STAR test on the computer. AR reading levels are given in two numbers such as 3.2. The first number is the grade level.   In this case the child is reading at a third grade reading level. The second number is the month. This child is reading at a third grade, second month reading level. We do not have the books color coded by reading level.

You can use our on-line catalog to find books by AR Reading Level.

  1. Go to our website: http://lib.williamson-tn.org/
  2. On the left put your cursor on “Find books and more”.
  3. Click on “Classic Catalog”.
  4. In the first box that says “title”, use the down arrow and change it to read “ keyword”.
  5. Determine the interest level of your child. Select one of the following.
    1. LG (lower grades) Kinder thru 3rd grade
    2. MG (middle grades) 4-8th grades
    3. MG+ (Middle Grade Plus) 6-8th grades
    4. UG (upper grades) 9-12 grades
  6. Write the AR in capital letters. Then enter the interest level also in capitals. Then write the numeric level. So I would write: AR LG 3.2 and up comes a list of all the books at that level.
  7. You can limit it by Selecting Children’s. Then click on “modify search”. Put a check on” limit search to available items”. Select the “location” you want.
  8. This method works fairly well. Sometimes books that are at other reading levels also are pulled up. Double check that the BL (book level) is the one that you are looking for.

There is also good website: The AR Bookfinder

This site can also help you find the AR Book level for books that you have at home. You can also use it to find the AR reading level of the books on our reading lists.  They now also have the Lexile level.

My children prefer to browse looking for books. How can I help them find books that are not too hard or too easy?

Answer: Have the child open the book and read a page. The child holds up a finger for every word missed. If more than five words are missed on a page, the book is too hard. This is often called the 5 finger rule. You can also tell by how fast or slowly the child reads. If she is reading the text very slowly and not missing any words, it still could be hard for her to read a chapter book at this speed. Try a book a little easier.

At school my child has a DRA reading level. How do I find books at that reading level?

Answer:

  1. The DRA test is given by the teacher rather than by a computer test, such as the AR Star test. Here is a chart that gives the reading levels by various reading programs/tests.
  2. Here is an article that explains about how to find books using the DRA level.

How do I find a book using Lexile Reading Levels?

Answer:

  1. Here’s a good article.
  2. This website finds books according to Lexile.
  3. In the Williamson County Library Catalog follow the directions of #3 above.  Instead of putting in an AR Reading level, write the number of lexile followed by Lexile. So if you write 830 Lexile you will get a list of books that we own at that level.

My child is struggling with the basics of reading. How can I help him learn to read?

Answer: There is an excellent website named Progressive Phonics.  It has a systematic collection of books that teach you how to instruct your child. The books are in color. They are funny and have parts for you to read aloud and for your child to read out loud.

What are some fun ways to learn the words they don’t know?

Answer:

  1. Notebook: You can keep a notebook and offer to write down the words that your child doesn’t know. This way you know what patterns need to be taught or reviewed. If you need to, you can look them up on the Progressive Phonics website.
  2. Play Memory: Make 2 flash cards on index cards for each of 10-15 words. Mix the cards up and turn the cards over. Each person takes a turn, flipping over two cards at a time. When the person finds a pair, he keeps them until the end of the game. The person with the most pairs at the end of the game, wins.
  3. Personal Speller: Make on a computer or in a notebook, a personal speller. This is a list of words in alphabetic order that the student has trouble understanding or spelling. This helps the student learn to read and spell the words and is very handy to have for writing assignments. This works well for older students.
  4. Post words that are being learned on the refrigerator or on a dry eraser board.
  5. For difficult words or word patterns, find a little tune to use as a memory devise. The B-I-N-G-O part in the song Bingo works well for the “ight” word family.
  6. For words that may be difficult to learn, may try writing the word using art supplies. Words like “though” might be hard to learn, but fun to do in crayon, glitter and glue. Spending the time on each letter might help make a connection. This can be hung on a cabinet, so it is easily seen.

My child is reading above grade level. How do I find books that are appropriate for his/her maturity?

Answer: We have grade level lists. These books are appropriate even for younger children. We often suggest lists that are above the grade level that match their reading level.

We know our child’s reading level. Does she/ he have to read at that level all the time?

Answer: Particularly children who are reading above their grade level find that they like to read at different reading levels. Sometimes they will read books that their peers are reading. Sometimes they enjoy quick, fast reads. Other times they want a challenge. It is good for students to read at various levels. This way they’ll read books that are meant for their age group as well as enjoy the challenge.

My child’s teacher says that although he is in third grade, he reads at an eighth grade reading level. How do I find appropriate books?

Answer: This is a challenge. One way to approach it is to find books at the next reading level up. So in this case, it would be fourth grade. If he stretches up to eighth grade, he’s going to miss a lot of great books and be in material that he’s not ready for. Going through the fourth grade and then the fifth grade lists, he’s going to have a lot of fun and occasionally will find a more challenging read and enjoy it. Another great resource is The Volunteer State Book Award lists. These are books and authors that are selected by librarians across the state for their great writing and have been published in the last few years. The kids vote on their favorites at the end of the year. We keep lists from preceding years, because these books are still great books and we have lots of copies.

I want to read out loud to my kids. What are good books to read?

Answer: Parents often find that it helps to read one grade level above where the children are. This way, they are exposed to ideas and vocabulary that the parent can explain.

If you need help, feel free to ask the Children’s and Young Adult library staff. They’ll be glad to make suggestions. Have a great adventure!

 

How Shakespeare Changed Everything by Stephen Marche

By Lindsay Roseberry, Reference Librarian

10256891My Mother was a Senior English teacher, so I learned the value of Shakespeare early on. I love the sonnets and enjoy seeing his plays, so I thought I knew a good deal about Shakespeare. I was wrong. Mr. Marche teaches Shakespeare; he must live and breathe it too. I learned so much more about the most famous of English authors. According to the author, most scholars believe he invented over 1700 words, which works out to be around ten percent of his entire vocabulary! He also invented the name Jessica. Who knew? And we have starlings in North America because of Shakespeare. Want to know why? Read the book.
I thoroughly enjoyed How Shakespeare Changed Everything. I even bought my own copy. I recommend this book to anyone who likes reading, literature, plays, language or trivia— actually, just about everyone.

Celebrate Children’s Book Week with WCPLtn !

By Jeffie Nicholson, Adult Services Manager

How you ask?

Read !!!

Everyday… but specifically May 12 -May 18, 2014

Children’s Book Week is the annual celebration of books for young people and the joy of reading.

It started in 1919 due to Franklin K. Matthiews’ belief that children’s books and literacy can change your life. He was the librarian for the Boy Scouts of America and he started promoting higher standards in children’s books in 1913. He proposed creating a Children’s Book Week to publishers, booksellers, and librarians.

You can participate and enjoy the week by reading a children’s book today!

Want to have more fun after reading?

Visit http://www.bookweekonline.com/puzzles to get a puzzle based on previous winners of the Children’s Choice Book Awards which are voted on by parents, young people, and librarians. If you have a Fancy Nancy fan, you may want to order one of the free Children’s Book Week poster http://www.bookweekonline.com/poster.

Bookmarks are available to print for free online too at http://www.bookweekonline.com/bookmark.

Visit http://ccbookawards.com/ if you’d like to vote for your favorite children’s book or see past winners and runners up.

Need a book? Then come see us at Williamson County Public Library, we’d love to see you in our Children’s or Teen rooms and help you find the perfect book or books to enjoy this week.

 

%d bloggers like this: