Category Archives: Kids

#BlackLivesMatter

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Below is a list of some of the #BlackLivesMatter resources in our collection. This selection includes both fiction and non-fiction for adults, teens, and children.  Clicking on the title will link you to the book in the WPCL online catalog. It is not a comprehensive list, a search of “race,” “diversity,” and/or “inclusion” in our library catalog will return other titles – along with ebooks, audio books, and DVDs in the same subject area.

 

Be the Bridge: Pursuing God’s Heart for Racial Reconciliation

by Latasha Morrison

Self-Portrait in Black and White: Unlearning Race

by Thomas Chatterton Williams

Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do

by Jennifer L. Eberhardt

Some of My Friends Are…: The Daunting Challenges and Untapped Benefits of Cross-Racial Friendships

by Deborah Plummer

It Was All a Dream: A New Generation Confronts the Broken Promise to Black America

by Reniqua Allen

The Black and the Blue: A Cop Reveals the Crimes, Racism, and Injustice in America’s Law Enforcement

by Matthew Horace

White Fragility: Why it’s So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism

by Robin Diangelo

 

White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of our Racial Divide

by Carol Anderson

Backlash: What happens When We Talk Honestly about Racism in America

by George Yancy

So You Want to Talk About Race

by Ijeoma Oluo

Skin Deep: Black Women and White Women Write About Race

by Marita Golden

Afropessimism

by Frank Wilderson III

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

by Michelle Alexander

A Long Dark Night: Race in America From Jim Crow to World by War II

by J. Michael Martin

Black Software: the Internet and Racial Justice, from the Afronet to Black Lives Matter

by Charlton D. McIlwain

Losing Power: African Americans and Racial Polarization in Tennessee Politics

by Sedou M. Franklin and Ray Block Jr.

The Black Cabinet: the Untold Story of African Americans and Politics During the Age of Roosevelt

by Jill Watts

Remembering the Memphis Massacre: an American Story

edited by Beverly Greene Bond and Susan Eva O’Donovan

 

CHILDRENS TITLES

What Lane?

by Torrey Maldonado

We are the Change: Words of Inspiration from Civil Rights Leaders

with an introduction by Harry Belafonte

Not My Idea: A Book about Whiteness

by Anastasia Higginbotham

Same, Same But Different

by Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw

The Youngest Marcher: The Story of Audrey Faye Hendricks, A Young Civil Rights Activist

by Cynthia Levinson

Let’s Talk About Race

by Julius Lester

The Promise of Change: One Girl’s Story in the Fight for School Equality

by Jo Ann Allen Boyce and Debbie Levy

The Only Black Girls in Town

by Brandy Colbert

We Rise, We Resist, We Raise Our Voices

by Wade Hudson

Black Brother, Black Brother

by Parker Jewell Rhodes

Clean Getaway

by Nic Stone

How High the Moon

by Karyn Parsons

Who We Are!: All about Being the Same and Being Different

by Robie H. Harris

The Parker Inheritance

by Varian Johnson

Can I Touch Your Hair? Poems of Race, Mistakes, and Friendship

by Irene Latham

New Kid

by Jerry Craft

Genesis Begins Again

by Alicia D. Williams

Blended

by Sharon M. Draper

You Don’t Know Everything, Jilly P!

Alex Gino

All Are Welcome

by Alexandra Penfold

I Walk with Vanessa: A Story about a Simple Act of Kindness

by Kerascoet

Ghost Boys

by Jewell Parker Rhodes

The breaking News

by Lynne Sarah Reul

March Forward Girl: From Young Warrior to Little Rock Nine

by Pattillo Melba Beals

Dark Sky Rising: Reconstruction and the Dawn of Jim Crow

by Henry Louis Gates Jr.

 

 

YOUNG ADULT TITLES

Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You

by Jason Reynolds

This Book is Anti-Racist: 20 Lessons on How to Wake Up

by Tiffany Jewell

March: (graphic novel collection) Book One, Book Two,  Book Three

By John Lewis

Getting Away With Murder: True Story of the Emmett Till Case

by Chris Crowe

The Hate U Give

by Angie Thomas

Tyler Johnson Was Here

by Jay Coles

All American Boys

by Jason Reynolds

Lies We Tell Ourselves

by Robin Talley

Monster

by Walter Dean Myers

Dear Martin

by Nic Stone

Piecing Me Together

by Renee Watson

See No Color

by Shannon Gibney

WC-TV with Library Storytimes

story-time-digitalWC-TV has posted several Library Story Times on their YouTube channel.  Be sure to go check it out. There are several Library staff, a Library Board Member and some guest readers.

Also on WCTV, Williamson County Parks and Recreation began their gradual reopening process this week. To learn more about their current guidelines and procedures, check out a new episode of It’s About You airing Monday on WC-TV.

The Williamson County Board of Commissioners Meeting will be held virtually and broadcast live at 7:00 p.m. on Monday.

The Williamson County Planning Commission Meeting will also be held virtually and broadcast live at 5:30 p.m on Thursday.

In addition to those, WC-TV has several other virtual County meetings that will be broadcast.. Check out the link below for more details.

Here is a link to the complete programming schedule through May 17th:

http://www.williamsoncounty-tn.gov/627/Programming-Schedule

WC-TV would also like to wish all the moms in the county a Happy Mother’s Day!

Happy Mother's Day text framed by red rose petals in an heart shape

You can also like WC-TV, follow them or watch them on social media:

Facebook: www.facebook.com/wctvnet

Twitter: www.twitter.com/wctvnet

Youtube: www.youtube.com/wctvnet

Online Storytime with Ms. Barbara

st with ms Barb

Well you know, once Ms. Liz did it, Ms. Barbara couldn’t resist.  She’ll be online on Friday mornings at 10a on the Children’s Department Facebook Page.

Check under videos on their page to see our previous storytimes and look at the events for more fun live storytimes with our staff!  We miss your kiddos and hope they can join us!

Online Story Time with Ms. Liz, Thursday, May 14

Williamson County Public Library Storytime with Ms. LIz Thursday May 7th at 10 am

Join Ms. Liz on the Children’s Department Facebook Page for a live preschool story time at 10a!

Follow our Children’s Department Facebook Page to see our past storytimes and for more fun live storytimes with our staff!

 

Join us for Facebook Live Bedtime Stories

Come enjoy some fun bedtime stories and finger plays with Ms. Stephanie and her dog, Dollie. Join them on our Children’s Department’s Facebook page.

Williamson County Public Library Storytime with Ms. Stephanie, Tune in Live on Facebook, Join Me(her) Weeknights Monday-Thursday and Sundays at 7 pm Follow our Facebook Page WCPLtn Children's Department - Main Library

New Online Story Times

Missing story time?  We miss you too.  We are sharing some of our favorite read-aloud stories on the Williamson County WCTV YouTube channel.

Library Director, Dolores Greenwald, loves Pete the Cat.  Here she shares one of the stories from the popular picture book series: https://youtu.be/TlfHSM8jlUk

Youth Services Manager, Ms. Stephanie, shares a story she loves: https://youtu.be/_CCy5jzdO4g

Children’s Librarian, Miz Liz, shares one of her favorite stories:  https://youtu.be/6YmrjmtCuQ8

Children’s Librarian, Ms. Barbara, sings Old McDonald had a Farm but there is a surprising twist to this classic: https://youtu.be/Ek8iwDjjRTw

Ms. Stephanie is back with Llama Llama, Red Pajama: https://youtu.be/gAxpSOZui_A

And more to come!

Read Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone Online

potter_social_nowavailable_facebook_finalHarry-Potter-Promo

Both Hoopla and Overdrive are offering the first book in the Harry Potter series for reading, no waiting.

Read Across America Day

By Amy Shropshire, Reference Librarian

Read Across America Day is a day to celebrate reading, with a special focus on reading for fun. Celebrated on the birthday of Dr. Seuss, it’s a perfect day to eat some green eggs and ham and pick up a book! Enjoy this quiz to see which Dr. Seuss character you would be.

Twist your tongue up trying to follow along with Oh say can you say, and explore social issues with The butter battle book and The Lorax. Besides Dr. Seuss’s classic melodic fiction like Hop on Pop and One fish, two fish, red fish, blue fish, we have some excellent biographies of Dr. Seuss for all reading levels. From Dr. Seuss the great doodler for beginner readers, to Oh the places he went and Who was Dr. Seuss? for more independent readers.

Check out the Dr. Seuss display in the children’s department for more fun reading suggestions, or ask one of our librarians. Also, join us March 1st-15th for a Dr. Seuss scavenger hunt, where we search for the silhouettes of some of his most iconic characters!

For a more grown-up take, check out our Dr. Seuss biographies upstairs, like The Seuss, the whole Seuss, and nothing but the Seuss: a visual biography of Theodor Seuss Geisel, as well as literary analysis of some of the political and philosophical idealism behind Dr. Seuss’s writings, such as in Dr. Seuss and philosophy, all the thinks you can think.the book tree cover

 

Read Across America has expanded from a purely Seussian holiday to focus on inclusive literature across reading levels, with recommended books of the month following in the literary tradition of Dr. Seuss of inclusive and thought provoking literature for all reading levels. The Book Tree by Paul Czajak for elementary readers is the book of the month for March which explores censorship themes with a light-hearted story about growing your own books.

For middle grade readers try out Zora and Me: the cursed ground by T. R. Simon,a historical fiction based with a fictionalized Zora Neale Hurston and her best friend tackling the tough topics of collective memory and the effects of slavery. Or try the March book of the month The faithful spy: Dietrich Bonhoeffer and the plot to kill Hitler by John Hendrix, a graphic biography of a pastor whose faith led him to fight against the Nazi regime.

For teen readers, What I leave behind by Alison McGhee explores loss, trauma and social culpability in a heartbreaking but ultimately hopeful story and The Love and Lies of Rukhsana Ali by Sabina Khan tackles the intersections of homophobia, religion, and cultural tradition in a plaintive emotional story. For more recommendations, see the Read Across America Display on the shelves outside the Teen Room, or ask a librarian!

You’re invited to Boo Books with Friends

book books 2019.png

Young ones and their families are invited to come trick-or-treat with the Friends of the Library. Costumes will be admired but are not required!

Activities will be in the Children’s Department on the first floor.

Call 615-595-1244 for more information.

Grab Your Library Card, and Glass Slippers and Come On a Cultural Journey!

By Stephanie Wycihowski, Youth Services Manager and Rebecca Tischler, Reference Department

It’s Elsa! It’s Moana! It’s Jasmine!  What do they have in common?  They’re Disney Princesses!

Growing up in American culture means that not only are we familiar with the Disney Princesses, we are inundated with them. And it all really started with the famous Cinderella; a mistreated girl forced into servitude by her evil step-family, who eventually finds love (and an escape) with a charming handsome prince.  Cinderella was released after 2 years of production on February 15, 1950, a full 13 years after Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, and after having been “in the works” since 1933.  It was one of the few great commercial hits of that time period for Disney and was also nominated for three Academy Awards: Best Sound Recording, Best Music Original Song for Bippidi-Bobbidi-Boo, and Best Music Scoring of a Musical Picture.  Unfortunately, the movie lost in all three categories even though the music was innovative in their use of vocal multi-tracks.  And while Snow White may hold the title of the First Princess, it wasn’t until Walt Disney saw the success of and money made from Cinderella that he became more interested in creating more Princess stories (Sleeping Beauty anyone?), partly because if it hadn’t been for Cinderella, Disney might have lost his company due to bankruptcy.

However, this innovative animated musical wasn’t as creative with it’s story since the princess was actually introduced centuries ago in foklore and oral stories, which is a trend continued today for most princesses.  Cinderella was based on the fairy tale Cendrillon by Charles Perrault published in 1697, which was a retelling of the story Cenerentola by Giambattista Basile. Actually, Perrault’s version was unique because of the addition of new story elements, such as the fairy godmother, the pumpkin carriage, and the glass slippers. These elements, incorporated into the Disney movie, are now ubiquitous to most of the Cinderella modern retellings and the glass slippers are basically synonymous with her name.

Who would have guessed French author Charles Perrault and Walt Disney would have created a vast and enduring love for Cinderella? Since 1950, an abundance of authors from around the world have been inspired over the generations to create their own retellings that share similarities to the original story, and culturally significant differences unique to their corners of the world. According to Mary Northrup, “most of the stories include an evil stepmother and stepsister(s), a dead mother, a dead or ineffective father, some sort of gathering such as a ball or festival, mutual attraction with a person of high status, a lost article, and a search that ends with success”.

Williamson County Public Library offers your families the opportunity to explore many of these unique Cinderella stories from around the world right here within our Youth Services Collection. Let’s us explore a sampling of some of these retellings from around the world.

Souci, San Robert.  Sootface: An Ojibwa Cinderella Story. Illus. by Daniel San Souci. This tale features a girl who is overworked by her sisters and who wishes to meet the invisible warrior. Because of her goodness and inner vision she sees him and becomes his bride.

Adapted by Jewell Reinhart Coburn. Illus. by Connie McLennan. Domitila: A Cinderella Tale from the Mexican Tradition The emphasis in this story is on Domitila’s accomplishments as a cook and leather artist, skills enhanced by the love her mother taught her to include in every task she undertook. It is her dead mother’s spirit and the legacy of her training on which Domitila depends, not a fairy godmother. The rich young man who searches for her is at first enamored of Domitila’s cooking, but learns to appreciate and love her deeper qualities.

Louie, Ai-Ling. Yeh-Shen: A Cinderella Story from China. Illus. by Ed Young. Here the hardworking and lovely girl befriends a fish, which is killed by her stepmother. Yeh-Shen saves the bones, which are magic, and they help her dress appropriately for a festival. When she loses her slipper after a fast exit, the king finds her and falls in love with her. This sad and beautiful story, with gentle illustrations, is retold from one of the oldest Cinderella stories.

Climo, Shirley. The Egyptian Cinderella. Illus. by Ruth Heller. In this version of Cinderella set in Egypt in the sixth century B.C., Rhodopes, a slave girl, eventually comes to be chosen by the Pharaoh to be his queen.

Climo, Shirley. The Korean Cinderella In this version of Cinderella set in ancient Korea, Pear Blossom, a stepchild, eventually comes to be chosen by the magistrate to be his wife.

Climo, Shirley. The Irish Cinderlad this version retells an age-old Irish tale that is an unusual twist on the popular Cinderella story. Just like his female counterpart, Becan has a mean stepmother and stepsisters. Unlike Cinderella, Becan has large feet and a magical bull for a fairy godmother. He defeats a sword-swinging giant, slays a fire-breathing dragon, and rescues a princess.

Steptoe, John. Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters Nyasha must put up with a nagging, bad-tempered sister. But when both girls are tested, Nyasha’s kindness wins her the prince. Breathtaking illustrations crown this intriguing story with a twist at the end.

Hickox, Rebecca. The Golden Sandal: A Middle Eastern Cinderella Story. Illus. by Will Hillenbrand. Maha, who works hard for her stepmother and stepsister, receives a gown of silk and golden sandals from a magic fish to wear to a wedding. This lively story will have listeners enthralled. Illustrations give a real flavor of the Middle East, with a touch of humor. An author’s note includes comments on derivations of the Cinderella story and references to Middle Eastern versions of the tale

You may think you know the Cinderella story in America but, I encourage you to take this opportunity to use your library card and visit the Williamson County Public Library.  Your Library card is your passport guide to a unique and culturally diverse journey through the eyes of these special characters on their own personal quests for love, acceptance, and happiness, within their own countries!


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