Category Archives: Authors and Books

#BlackLivesMatter

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Below is a list of some of the #BlackLivesMatter resources in our collection. This selection includes both fiction and non-fiction for adults, teens, and children.  Clicking on the title will link you to the book in the WPCL online catalog. It is not a comprehensive list, a search of “race,” “diversity,” and/or “inclusion” in our library catalog will return other titles – along with ebooks, audio books, and DVDs in the same subject area.

 

Be the Bridge: Pursuing God’s Heart for Racial Reconciliation

by Latasha Morrison

Self-Portrait in Black and White: Unlearning Race

by Thomas Chatterton Williams

Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do

by Jennifer L. Eberhardt

Some of My Friends Are…: The Daunting Challenges and Untapped Benefits of Cross-Racial Friendships

by Deborah Plummer

It Was All a Dream: A New Generation Confronts the Broken Promise to Black America

by Reniqua Allen

The Black and the Blue: A Cop Reveals the Crimes, Racism, and Injustice in America’s Law Enforcement

by Matthew Horace

White Fragility: Why it’s So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism

by Robin Diangelo

 

White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of our Racial Divide

by Carol Anderson

Backlash: What happens When We Talk Honestly about Racism in America

by George Yancy

So You Want to Talk About Race

by Ijeoma Oluo

Skin Deep: Black Women and White Women Write About Race

by Marita Golden

Afropessimism

by Frank Wilderson III

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

by Michelle Alexander

A Long Dark Night: Race in America From Jim Crow to World by War II

by J. Michael Martin

Black Software: the Internet and Racial Justice, from the Afronet to Black Lives Matter

by Charlton D. McIlwain

Losing Power: African Americans and Racial Polarization in Tennessee Politics

by Sedou M. Franklin and Ray Block Jr.

The Black Cabinet: the Untold Story of African Americans and Politics During the Age of Roosevelt

by Jill Watts

Remembering the Memphis Massacre: an American Story

edited by Beverly Greene Bond and Susan Eva O’Donovan

 

CHILDRENS TITLES

What Lane?

by Torrey Maldonado

We are the Change: Words of Inspiration from Civil Rights Leaders

with an introduction by Harry Belafonte

Not My Idea: A Book about Whiteness

by Anastasia Higginbotham

Same, Same But Different

by Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw

The Youngest Marcher: The Story of Audrey Faye Hendricks, A Young Civil Rights Activist

by Cynthia Levinson

Let’s Talk About Race

by Julius Lester

The Promise of Change: One Girl’s Story in the Fight for School Equality

by Jo Ann Allen Boyce and Debbie Levy

The Only Black Girls in Town

by Brandy Colbert

We Rise, We Resist, We Raise Our Voices

by Wade Hudson

Black Brother, Black Brother

by Parker Jewell Rhodes

Clean Getaway

by Nic Stone

How High the Moon

by Karyn Parsons

Who We Are!: All about Being the Same and Being Different

by Robie H. Harris

The Parker Inheritance

by Varian Johnson

Can I Touch Your Hair? Poems of Race, Mistakes, and Friendship

by Irene Latham

New Kid

by Jerry Craft

Genesis Begins Again

by Alicia D. Williams

Blended

by Sharon M. Draper

You Don’t Know Everything, Jilly P!

Alex Gino

All Are Welcome

by Alexandra Penfold

I Walk with Vanessa: A Story about a Simple Act of Kindness

by Kerascoet

Ghost Boys

by Jewell Parker Rhodes

The breaking News

by Lynne Sarah Reul

March Forward Girl: From Young Warrior to Little Rock Nine

by Pattillo Melba Beals

Dark Sky Rising: Reconstruction and the Dawn of Jim Crow

by Henry Louis Gates Jr.

 

 

YOUNG ADULT TITLES

Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You

by Jason Reynolds

This Book is Anti-Racist: 20 Lessons on How to Wake Up

by Tiffany Jewell

March: (graphic novel collection) Book One, Book Two,  Book Three

By John Lewis

Getting Away With Murder: True Story of the Emmett Till Case

by Chris Crowe

The Hate U Give

by Angie Thomas

Tyler Johnson Was Here

by Jay Coles

All American Boys

by Jason Reynolds

Lies We Tell Ourselves

by Robin Talley

Monster

by Walter Dean Myers

Dear Martin

by Nic Stone

Piecing Me Together

by Renee Watson

See No Color

by Shannon Gibney

Excellent Citizens and Notable Partings in Williamson County, Tennessee Book Publication Announcement

What was Special Collections doing during the covid-19 shelter-at-home mandate?

We’re glad you asked! Your Special Collection librarians were right here, working hard on compiling and editing a new book for our department, and for you! As much as we didn’t like the circumstances, we welcomed this time to focus on bringing our work to completion. We fully intend to have our new book available for purchase and/or perusal sometime in June, barring any unforeseen circumstances. 

What is the title?

The long title is: 

Excellent Citizens and Notable Partings: A Further Look at the Popular Series, “Portrait of an Excellent Citizen,” Published in The Review-Appeal, 1966-1968, in Franklin, Tennessee

What made you compile a book? 

Inspiration. It’s as simple as that. Nearly two years ago, an old box of donated items provided  hours of delight and entertainment as we combed through its contents. Among the assorted papers, we found a nearly complete set of Review-Appeal “Portrait of an Excellent Citizen” clippings which, we soon discovered, ran as a series between the years 1966-1968. We were intrigued by this Review-Appeal appointed group of outstanding citizens, so highly regarded that each face was individually hand drawn by Tennessean staff artist, Bill Duke. 

Why these citizens?

Each generation recognizes those among us who stand out, the ones getting things done, the ones everyone either knows or “knows of.” How the Review-Appeal “Portrait of an Excellent Citizen” series came into being is a bit of a mystery, as well as their selection process. It seemed to have just appeared out of the blue, with no introduction and no conclusion. However, once re-discovered, we quickly recognized that this collection of citizen portraits gave us a unique snapshot of Williamson County and some, but not all, of the more visible citizens of the late 1960s, and that in itself was significant. While our nation was in the throes of political turmoil and cultural revolution, it would seem that business and life went on as usual in Williamson County.

Why is this book important?

As we began to wonder how the lives of these “Excellent Citizens” played out and what it would look like to read their end-of-life story, we set out to locate their obituaries and other articles. After compiling a fair amount of additional material, it was easy to see the treasure we had unearthed. We knew if we could get this all into a book, it would become an important resource for present and future researchers in finding family connections and aiding their understanding of these citizens and their place in our midst. For added interest, we threaded in ads of the era found in the Review-Appeal, The Williamson Leader, and the local Franklin phone directory. We also used quotations and excerpts from other local sources whenever possible.

Are any of the Excellent Citizens still living?

Yes, only about 10. For those citizens who are still living, we sent letters or called asking for their help, or their family’s help, in creating an updated entry for them. Most were happy to do so. And as word got out, some families of those citizens already gone were eager to help as well. In that way, we were able to amass original and important additional content for many of our living and deceased Excellent Citizens.

Are there other books about local people from Williamson County?

Yes, there are quite a few wonderful biographies, and several narratives of life in Franklin which are very  entertaining as well as factual. We are eager to point out to our readers works such as Who’s Who in Williamson County by Jane Bowman Owen, Who’s Who in Williamson County by Nat Osborne, Jr., and Who’s Who in Williamson County by Derry Carlisle, reprints of the Review-Appeal column of the same name published over a span of 35 years, all colorfully written and re-published by Rick Warwick. We also encourage our patrons to read the narratives of locals who have chronicled their own lives in Williamson County during this era, and in doing so, have animated the lives of many other citizens, some featured in our book. Look for works by Leonard Isaacs, Russ Farnsworth, Bill Peach, Bobby Langley, Jimmy Gentry, W.C. Yates, and others. Many of these are available to check out at WCPL.

Why are these 143 citizens important?

In today’s world, we have “social media” and “influencers,” but these men and women of the late 1960s were influential — they were doers, and their lives reflected their interaction with and influence in the community. For a time, they were all here in this one place, together, the stalwarts of their day. We hope this book, which we have painstakingly compiled and edited, will provide its readers and researchers with a useful resource as well as a source of memories of a time gone by, now known as The Sixties. 

Watch for details about our new book, Excellent Citizens and Notable Partings, coming out soon!

From the Special Collections Department

Marcia P. Fraser and Ashleigh M. Florida

Sharon’s Book Pile

I’ve just finished a few books that I really enjoyed and I thought you might like to hear about them. I read a little of everything – mysteries, westerns, psychological thrillers, classical literature, historical fiction, nonfiction (especially about gardening, dogs and home décor), humor and lots of horror. I try to switch things up, so if I read a dark or scary novel, I’ll follow that with something really funny or light. 

Three of the books in Sharon's book pile.

Three of the books in Sharon’s book pile.

At the top of my list is Grady Hendrix’s The Southern Book Club’s Guide to Slaying Vampires. It follows Patricia, a typical housewife in 1990s Charleston, and her book club friends as they encounter a mysterious new neighbor who may or may not be a killer…or something worse. The book starts off laugh-out-loud funny, but quickly turns dark and extremely grisly. While Patricia tries to convince her friends and her dense husband that there’s something terribly wrong with the newcomer, she struggles to live up to the ideal of the perfect wife, mother and hostess. I’m not sure which was scarier, the monster next door or the pressure on our heroine to live up to society’s expectations. You can check it out at WCPL (F HENDRIX) and in our eLibrary via R.E.A.Ds. as an ebook and eaudio.

Book cover for The Animals at Lockwood Manor

The Animals at Lockwood Manor, a novel, by Jane Healey

The Animals at Lockwood Manor by Jane Healey is historical fiction with a really creepy touch of Gothic eeriness. Hetty, a young curator at a London natural history museum, is charged with evacuating the museum’s stuffed mammal collection to Lockwood Manor, a huge Downton Abby-type estate, where they’ll be safe from German bombs during the Blitz. She runs afoul of the ruthless lord of the manor and his equally unpleasant staff, but bonds with the lord’s beautiful and troubled daughter, Lucy. Soon Hetty is fighting to save her precious collection, as one mysterious calamity after another befalls them. Could the estate really be haunted by the terrifying spirit of a woman in white, or does something even more sinister threaten Hetty, Lucy, and the irreplaceable mammals? I loved finding out. I listened to the audiobook through Tennessee R.E.A.D.S. It is also available in print (F HEALEY) and in our eLibrary via Tennessee R.E.A.D.S. as an ebook also.

For a really fun page-turner, check out The Other Woman by Sandi Jones. Emily, a successful young business woman, has met the man of her dreams, Adam. He’s crazy about her too. Things go swimmingly until Adam introduces Emily to his mother, Pammie. For reasons Emily can’t fathom, Pammie detests her at first sight and it’s soon clear she will stop at NOTHING to ruin Emily’s life and keep her from marrying Adam. It’s obvious to Emily that her future mother-in-law is a manipulative sociopath, but to the rest of the world, Pammie is an angelic elderly lady, beloved by everyone. It’s fun to guess what outrageous stunt Pammie will throw at Emily next, and there’s also a great plot twist along the way.  I listened to the audiobook through Tennessee R.E.A.D.S.  It is also available in print (F Jones) and in our eLibrary via Tennessee R.E.A.D.S.. as an ebook.

If you’re looking for something darker and more complex, try A Head Full of Ghosts by Paul Tremblay, whose terrifying novel The Cabin at the End of the World was a recent sensation. A Head Full of Ghosts is narrated by a young woman named Merry as she recounts the bizarre events that befell her family 15 years earlier. When Merry is 8, her older sister Marjorie begins exhibiting strange and extremely disturbing behavior. Mom thinks Marjorie needs therapy, but Dad believes Marjorie is possessed and needs an exorcism. Things get REALLY weird and increasingly tense and scary when the family’s situation becomes the subject of a hit reality TV show. Check out a hard copy at WCPL (F TREMBLAY) or you can listen to the audiobook as I did through Tennessee R.E.A.D.S.  It is also available as an ebook in Tennessee R.E.A.D.S. and Hoopla.

My current reads are Stephen King’s latest, If It Bleeds (Available in print and our eLibrary via Tennessee R.E.A.D.S. as an ebook and eaudio.), and Savage Season (Available in print) by one of my favorite authors, Joe R. Lansdale. I’ll report on those in a week or so and suggest some other interesting books as well. 

Happy reading while you’re safe at home!

Sharon

 

Can You See It?

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This image was shared multiple times on a library meme Facebook group and I thought it was too clever not to share.

Artist: Phil Shaw instagram.com/philshaw775/  He doesn’t share a whole lot of his art there but you can find more of it at @rebeccahossackartgallery and https://www.instagram.com/rebeccahossackartgallery/ — with Chrissy Muns.

What Library Books I Am Listening To…

I am currently listening to mystery novels by Kate White on Hoopla.  I just started listening to Have you seen me? which is a standalone novel where we are introduced to the main character as she begins to suffer from amnesia.  That’s as far as I am into this book.
I have also listened to three of the author’s Bailey Weggins mysteries, So Pretty It Hurts, Even If It Kills Her, and Such A Perfect Wife.  Her protagonists live in NYC and the mysteries that I have listened to so far take place in NY and New England.  Bailey Weggins is a crime writer who ends up solving the mysteries that she is reporting.
We have many of her books in the Library collection and in READS.
I recently listened to a couple of psychological thrillers by Mary Kubica. The Other Mrs. and When The Lights Go Out.  It’s hard to say a whole lot about these without ruining the experience. Her works can be found in the Library collection and in READS.
~Marcia B.

My book pile…

I’m a big fan of anything cross genre, especially if it’s dystopian. Teen fiction is also a big draw for me, and unconventional stories. Lately I’ve interested in reading a lot of creeping psychological horror with sci-fi and fantasy leanings.

house of leaves

My all time favorite of the creeping psychological dread is probably House of Leaves. It uses quite a bit of unconventional writing techniques not often seen outside of poetry anthologies, but isn’t too heavy handed. The main character is piecing together snippets of documents about a fictional movie about a house that doesn’t exist and uses the idea of space and distance in literally maddening ways.

 

the hum and the shiver

If you like a little fae influence, I recommend The Hum and the Shiver. It starts out fairly gumshoe detective, but quickly introduces the reader to a whole hidden world and culture of magic and music and secrets, all set in modern small-town Appalachia where certain people are more than they seem to be.

 

fred vampire accountantFor something a little more light-hearted I’ve been listening to the audiobook version on the Overdrive app of The Utterly Uninteresting and Unadventurous Tales of Fred, the Vampire Accountant. The whole series is a really hilarious, slightly episodic adventures of Fred, who is a very introverted, rather boring accountant, and also a vampire, as he gathers up a ragtag crew of supernatural misfits as his friends in his new vampire social life. He also saves a bunch of people, somehow. Several times.

~ Amy

My Book Pile…

I like to read a variety of things.  I am partial to science fiction, urban fantasy, and horror novels and any mixes thereof.  Romance novels do intrigue me but I haven’t read as much of them lately.  I do like to read adult graphic novels too.  I do read some nonfiction – management and leadership plus popular or recommended books to me by other staff.  Teen novels are something I enjoy too because of the tightly told stories that pack such an emotional impact plus they can be read quickly (or maybe that’s just me).  I also frequently will sneak down to the Children’s Department and read some of the new picture books for the same reason plus the artwork is so varied and delightful.

Some authors I like are Orson Scott Card, Patricia Briggs, Dean Koontz, Stephen King, Josh Malerman, Kelley Armstrong and Sarah Addison Allen.  Of course, there are many others.

Books I have recently read:

Stack of Library Books mentioned in blog post

Harleen by Stjepan Sejic (don’t ask me to say it) – a graphic novel that is an origin story for Harley Quinn from the Batman universe.  An excellent read with extra details in the artwork which I love and makes it fun to go back through and look for.   I’m currently reading Birds of Prey: Harley which offers a different origin story and different artwork, more bubbly whereas the other novel is darker in tone and illustration.

Lost and Found by Orson Scott Card – fiction novel about a young man with the knack for finding things and returning them to their owners. Obviously that would have some drawbacks with accusations of theft and suspicions.  I really enjoyed it and cried a little at the end, not that it was sad-sad but touching.

The Furies by Katie Lowe – fiction novel about a group of girls in a private school. Quite dark in a way that made me think of Gone Girl.  It left me feeling like I had just driven slowly past a car wreck. Not that it was bad, I couldn’t stop reading it.

I am currently reading Dean Koontz’s Devoted.  I’m a sucker for his books with the golden retrievers.  I remember reading his novel Watchers as a teenage and have devoured his books ever since.

~Jeffie

Tuesday Book Brunch First Meeting!

Tues Book Brunch
Grab your coffee or tea and let’s settle down to talk about what books we are reading. This is an informal book chat where we talk and share about the books we are reading. All readers are welcome (just not too many at once), print or audio.
Registration is required and limited to 15 readers so click the ticket link to go to the sign up page. I need an email to send you the link to join the meeting.
You will need a computer with a mic and hopefully a camera (we don’t judge and don’t care if you have pants.) We’ll have a waiting list and can spin off another group.
As this is our first meeting, the meeting will be with the staffer calling on each attendee in turn to introduce themself, talk briefly about what they like to read and share about a book that they are currently reading. Everyone will get 5 minutes which puts the meeting at 45 minutes more or less so plan on hanging out online for about an hour. We can see how it goes after we’ve all tried muting and unmuting our mics (no judging! We can do better than Congress, right?).
Participants will get an email with the link to join on Monday, May 11 by 1p.

New Online Story Times

Missing story time?  We miss you too.  We are sharing some of our favorite read-aloud stories on the Williamson County WCTV YouTube channel.

Library Director, Dolores Greenwald, loves Pete the Cat.  Here she shares one of the stories from the popular picture book series: https://youtu.be/TlfHSM8jlUk

Youth Services Manager, Ms. Stephanie, shares a story she loves: https://youtu.be/_CCy5jzdO4g

Children’s Librarian, Miz Liz, shares one of her favorite stories:  https://youtu.be/6YmrjmtCuQ8

Children’s Librarian, Ms. Barbara, sings Old McDonald had a Farm but there is a surprising twist to this classic: https://youtu.be/Ek8iwDjjRTw

Ms. Stephanie is back with Llama Llama, Red Pajama: https://youtu.be/gAxpSOZui_A

And more to come!

April is National Poetry Month!

nat poetry month

April is National Poetry Month! As are many of you, I’m spending loads more time with my kids. We’re attempting to keep up with reading and math, as encouraged by the school system. What better way to keep up with reading than by reading poems? For many kids, poetry can seem a bit abstract and perhaps not as engaging as a full story. But with exposure (and a convincing delivery!) comes understanding and appreciation.

Of course many of us turn to the master, Shel Silverstein, to introduce our kids to poems. With a perfect mix of utter silliness and a touch of self awareness, truly those collections are classic. But my favorites, without question, are two books of poetry by beloved Winnie the Pooh creator A.A. Milne.

When We Were Very Young” is a collection originally published in 1924. “Now We Are Six” is a follow up collection from 1927. All the poems are written by Milne, and each page contains illustrations by Ernest H. Shephard. The content is positively charming.

Your kids will encounter familiar characters, like Pooh himself, and Christopher Robin. Concepts like imaginary friends, changing of the seasons, and growing up crop up in the pages. With the works being almost 100 years old it might seem as if they’re no longer as relevant… but the innocence of childhood is something that transcends time. And it’s something these collections capture in a most pure and heartfelt way. I know many of these poems by heart and can recite them from memory. You may find yourself familiar with some of the lines, as a few of them became ubiquitous Pooh quotes!

If you’ve never had the pleasure of reading these books, now is the perfect time! These poems find joy in the simplest things, and emphasize the power of imagination. Sharing these poems with your children will be the highlight of your day!

Both of my boys are now well past 6, but on their 6th birthdays I recited to them the title poem from “Now We Are Six“:

When I was One,
I had just begun.

When I was Two,
I was nearly new.

When I was Three,
I was hardly Me.

When I was Four,
I was not much more.

When I was Five,
I was just alive.

But now I am Six, I'm as clever as clever.
So I think I'll be six now for ever and ever.

~ A. A. Milne

Read the rest of this entry

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