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Choose Privacy

By Lance Hickerson, Reference DepartmentPAW-poster-02-AW

The beginning of May is set aside for observing Choose Privacy Week. This is a time we ask our patrons to consider ways to protect their private information while using the internet, whether in the library, on the go, or at home.

It’s no secret why privacy is a pressing concern these days. As more and more people across the world spend more and more time on the internet, some users make a career of stealing personal data. This causes major complications for those affected.   In just the year 2008, identity theft cost Americans $54 billion in loss. Further, the average amount of time victims spent repairing the damage done by the creation of new fraudulent accounts is 165 hours.  Protecting our private information is important.

What are some basic tips to follow?   Here are a few from the site OnGuardOnLine.

  • Use Security Software That Updates Automatically
  • Treat Your Personal Information Like Cash
  • Check Out Companies to Find Out Who You’re Really Dealing With
  • Give Personal Information Over Encrypted Websites Only
  • Protect Your Passwords
  • Back Up Your Files

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What are some basic privacy tips to remember when I’m using the computer in the library?  The American Library Association suggests the following:

  • Delete you browsing history
  • Log Out of all accounts
  • “Remember me” NOT: Make sure the remember me function is NOT enabled on a public computer.
  • Look for the “s”: Make sure sites are security enabled. Look for websites with https:// or “shttp://” which means the site takes extra measures to secure your information. Http:// is not secure.
  • Get savy about Wi-Fi hotspots: to protect your information do not conduct personal transactions requiring person data such as banking on Wi-Fi hotspots or public computers. Wait to conduct these on a private home computer.

 I’ll be providing more tips soon to help people keep their information safe.  In the meantime, stay safe.

10 Black Friday Shopping Tips!

By Rebecca Tischler, Reference Librarian

  1. 3066235278_3f092ac930Avoid taking naps in front of the store. You might get run over when the door’s open.
  2. Don’t try to wrestle for something with someone twice your size.
  3. Be barely hydrated so that you don’t have to stop for the bathroom.
  4. Bring your entire family so they can carry your stuff (and you can buy more).
  5. Sleep through Thanksgiving so that you’re well rested for the early marathon shopping.
  6. Don’t forget to ask for a gift receipt. Remember, some of it may be on sale for a reason.
  7. Dress in layers, so that you’re warm while you’re waiting to get in, and can remove layers once you’re running and shoving.
  8. Know your budget! You don’t want to buy so many discounted items that you go into debt.
  9. Have a plan of attack. Scope out your favorite stores ahead of time, know which aisles to hit, and provide everyone with a whistle. This way, if anyone in your group gets involved in a tug-of-war, they can call for back-up.
  10. Avoid it altogether, and wait for Cyber Monday when you can aggressively shop for deals from your bed.

And finally – remember to be safe. You don’t want to be part of the mob that always ends up in the next days papers.  So be courteous to the other shoppers and to the employees, which will help to keep a safe environment for everyone.

Finding Your Family on Census Records Through Ancestry.com

by Dorris Douglass, Special Collections Librarian

CensusRecordUse of Ancestry.com is free In the Special Collections Department, open Tuesday-Saturday 9-5:30, and to help you use it, here are some very important tips to remember.

  • Pay absolutely no attention to spelling! Census takers couldn’t spell. This researcher has seen the name Jacob spelled “Jacup” on the census.
  • Pay close attention to extra people with a different last name in a household. Frequently those listed as “boarder” were aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, nephews and especially mothers-in-law.
  • Pay close attention to who is living next door. The guys either married the gal next door or their first cousin. This researcher looked for an ancestor for 10 years only to find him living next door to a grandson by a different last name.
  • Be aware that ages recorded in the census can be 2 to 3 years off. However, usually the younger the closer to the truth. By the time one got to their 80’s either he or his family members had forgotten how old he really was.
  • Know the abbreviations for Men’s first names: Alexr= Alexander, Benj = Benjamin, Geo =George, Hy=Henry, Jas = James, Jno =John ( Why I have no idea), Patk=Patrick, Robt= Robert Thos=Thomas, Wm=William. The last letter of the longer abbreviation are usually written as a superscripts, so that you might see only the Tho for Thomas unless you look carefully for the little tiny s. Periods were usually omitted after the abbreviation.
  • Know common nicknames and know that nicknames often rhyme. Some are very tricky.
    • Belle=Isabel, Mable, Sybil;
    • Beth, Betty, Betsy, Bessie =Elizabeth;
    • Biddy, Bridey= Bridget;
    • Bill = William, rhymes with Will;
    • Cal=Caleb, Calvin;
    • Cate (old spelling) =Catherine;
    • Carrie= Carololine;
    • Carey= Charles (modern nickname Chuck);
    • Cephus=Josephus;
    • Daisey = Margaret ( for a Queen Margaret whose favorite flower was a daisy);
    • Dick = Richard, rhymes with Rick;
    • Dollie, Dolly, Doll = Dorothy;
    • Duke=Marmaduke;
    • Ed, Ned, Ted =Edward, Edmond;
    • Elsie= Elizabeth:
    • Ella, Ellie, Nelly = Elle , but also Helen;
    • Etta, Nettie = Henrietta;
    • Fee = Felix;
    • Hi = Hiram,
    • Jack = John;
    • Kit = Christopher,
    • Lois= Louise,
    • Lottie = Charlotte;
    • Ky = Hezekiah;
    • Mae, May, Molly, Polly =Mary;
    • Mag, Maggie, Meg, Peg, Peggy = Margaret;
    • Mattie, Patty, Patsy = Martha;
    • Maud =Magdalene,
    • Maude (male) = Mordichi;
    • Nancy=Hannah,
    • Neil, Connie,=Cornelius;
    • Sallie, Sally = Sarah,
    • Stella = Estel, Esther;
    • Sukey ,Susan, = Susannah (Suckey, African American 1870/ 80 = a former slave midwife who took care of the sucklings);
    • Ted = Theodore (but can be = Edward).

Come join us to hunt for your ancestors!

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