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International CAPS LOCK Day!!

By Lindsay Roseberry, Reference Department2326873674_c392bdc4e0_o

In 2000, when Derek Arnold created International CAPS LOCK day, it was a parody, making fun of those people who insist in typing everything in ALL CAPITALS. But, as it happened, it became more and more popular, with people celebrating it just for the key itself. No parody at all. The day became so popular with internet users that it is now celebrated twice a year—on June 28 (this Sunday)and on October 22.  But, WHERE DID WE GET THE CAPS LOCK KEY FROM?!?

antique-remington-typewriter-725x482In the beginning, before computers (GASP!) there were typewriters (ancient technology that went the way of the PHONOGRAPGH). Remington typewriters were the first to have a shift key, so you could shift to a capital letter but it was just a toggle switch–there was no way to keep that key down. In 1914, Remington added the SHIFT LOCK KEY on its Junior model, which gave the user access to more characters by keeping the key locked. Some think typewriters and computers added the CAPS LOCK KEY for businesses that needed forms typed in all caps (so anyone who hates the caps lock key, blame them). Typewriters placed the CAPS LOCK KEY where it is now, and computer designers copied the typewriter keyboard when the first put out computers, keeping the familiar QWERTY keyboard we all have become accustomed to. Even then, there were complaints when computers kept the same keyboard design (for those of you who wish the keyboard letters were alphabetical, they tried that first… there were issues, and now we’re stuck).

Early on in Internet history, Internet users had only text keys to show emphasis, no fun yet strange emoticons that can create entire conversations by themselves. They used **** and CAPS to differentiate their thoughts and emotions. Some people, holdovers from early Internet days perhaps, still type messages in all capitals. Nowadays, writing in ALL CAPS has become an etiquette NO-NO, since it is the equivalent of shouting online. Every once in a while for emphasis is considered OK, but not everything in caps. People have gotten fired for using all caps all the time. REALLY! In 2007, a woman in New Zealand was fired from her job after she sent one too many memos in all caps.

Hit your caps lock button and celebrate INTERNATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY! Just don’t get fired.9762955951_814205da36


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Magna Carta, 800th anniversary this week

By Lindsay Roseberry, Reference Department435px-Pictures_of_English_History_Plate_XXIV_-_King_John_and_Magna_Carta

We may remember the phrase Magna Carta (Latin for Great Charter) from our history books, but probably few remember what it was actually about. King John was surrounded by an army of rebellious lords in the fields of Runnymede on June 15, 1215, (actually they were blocking his re-entry into London.) They forced him to agree as king and put his seal on this “great charter” to bring peace to the land. Truly, it was a way to agree to peace, so he could keep his throne. Strangely enough, he never really signed it; he died a year later in 1216. His son, Henry III, in 1225, issued a new, slimmed down version of this “great charter”, in return for the support of the barons in 1225. (Again, the barons!) Later, in 1265, he trimmed the charter down again and it to establish the first Parliament (or parlement, in French, based on the word discuss.) (If you missed the google doodle created for this anniversary, it’s cute.)

The original Magna Carta had 63 clauses. A third of this text was either cut or rewritten for the 1225 version. Today, only three of the original 63 clauses remain on the statute books. Of these three survivors one defends the liberties and rights of the English Church, another confirms the liberties and customs of London and other towns, and the third gives all English subjects the right to justice and a fair trial. This is the big one that made such an impact on English law, and therefore American law.

Here is the translation: No free man shall be seized or imprisoned, or stripped of his rights or possessions, or outlawed or exiled, or deprived of his standing in any other way, nor will we proceed with force against him, or send others to do so, except by the lawful judgement of his equals or by the law of the land. To no-one will we sell, to no-one deny or delay right or justice. (This means that for the first time in British history, and possibly world history, no one was above the law—not even the king!)Sothebys-Magna-Carta-1024x691

  • The right to due process (Habeas Corpus) allowed free men (not serfs, slaves or women) to be judged and if needed punished by a jury of their peers.
  • Justice could not delayed, bought or sold.
  • All fines had to be reasonable, so no free man would lose everything paying a fine.
  • Sheriffs could not take your property (presumably while you are in jail)

But that happened in England. What influence does the Magna Carta have for us, citizens of the United States of America?? Many of the founding fathers had studied English law and knew of this charter, and how it had limited the rights of the king. Since we were rebelling against the British government and the king, they wanted to use it as part of the foundation of their new nation – the United States of America. Many historians believe the founding fathers also used these statements, or at least Thomas Jefferson and James Madison did, in the writing of the Constitution as well. In 1976, for the bicentennial, Britain loaned one of the four surviving original copies to the United States for display at the Capitol. We did return the original, but kept a copy, which is still on display there.

after Unknown artist, etching, late 18th to early 19th century

after Unknown artist, etching, late 18th to early 19th century

So what started out as a peace deal between King John and the rich rebellious barons (who were angry at being overtaxed) became, in time, a foundation of one of our basics rights as put forth in the Bill of Rights and the Constitution. Read the rest of this entry

Happy Birthday, Garfield!

By Lindsay Roseberry, Reference DepartmentGarfield_fat

Garfield, the fat marmalade cat we all love, sauntered into our lives on June 19, 1978. Little did we know that he would be even more popular after thirty-seven years!

Jim Davis, Garfield’s creator if you didn’t know, studied art in college and went straight to work for the creator of Tumbleweeds comic strip. He actually started out with a gnat character, but soon realized that there were no comic strips about cats. Enter Garfield. He named the cat after his grandfather (who in turn was named after President Garfield), and based the cynical cat on all the cats he’d ever met, all rolled into one. (Makes you wonder if he ever knew a cat that liked lasagna as much as Garfield does.) It debuted in 41 newspapers. After several months, it was pulled by at least one newspaper; the readers raised such a hue and cry that it was reinstated and was never pulled again.

Garfield so quickly became a sensation that Jim Davis stated Paws, Inc., to manage the worldwide rights of the character. As we all know, there have been books, movies, merchandise and more sold with the famous Garfield grin on them. His company Paws, Inc., has started a philanthropic arm helping with restoring wetlands, forests and prairies. He has won an award from the National Arbor Day foundation for building the first all-natural wastewater plant for commercial use.

So now when you read your daily Garfield carton/comic (and let’s be honest, you always read it) you can enjoy it more now know that Jim Davis is sharing his wealth with the world. And many readers are truly happy that John finally has a girlfriend.

FAQs:323214852_77e9b17fd3
• The Garfield comic strip is read in over 2100 newspapers by at least 200 million people
• Jim Davis does have one cat, named Nermal, and a dog named Pooky
• He enjoys gardening, golf, fishing and being with his family, including grandchildren
• Garfield is the most widely syndicated comic strip in the world, according to Guinness World Records
• Garfield was born at Mama Leoni’s Italian Restaurant, where he developed his love of lasagna
• In 1982, Garfield was on the cover of People Magazine
• John Arbuckle, Garfield’s caretaker, has a job at a Lexus dealership in Tulsa
• Garfield.com is the strip’s official website, containing archives of past strips along with games and an online store (also apps for Android and iOS)


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Celebrating Arthur Conan Doyle

“If in 100 years I am only known as the man who invented Sherlock Holmes then I will have considered my life a failure.” ― Arthur Conan Doyle

By Lindsay Roseberry, Reference Department

156 years ago he was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on May 22.

In 1876, he began medical studies at the University of Edinburgh, graduating with a specialty in treating syphilis.   While he was studying medicine, he wrote a few short stories and at least one medical paper. After getting his degree he worked as a physician on two ocean voyages, one, the Hope of Peterhead (a whaling ship) going to Greenland and back and one, The Mayumba, sailing along the West African coast. (This would explain his later interest in the Marie Celeste, a ship found floating on the ocean with no one aboard. No one has yet solved this mystery, although several have made creditable suggestions)

In 1882, he opened his physician’s office in Portsmouth, after briefly having a partner. Since his practice was slow in getting off the ground, he started writing fiction again. In 1890, he went to Vienna to study ophthalmology and soon after graduating, moved his practice to London. He again struggled to bring in patients and again turned to writing. He was married twice and had five children, the last of whom died in 1977!

A Study in Scarlet was his first Holmes and Watson short story. The sequel The Sign of Four soon followed. It is well-known that he based his Holmes character on his former teacher Joseph Bell; even Robert Louis Stevenson recognized the similarity. Early on he wanted to write historical fiction. We all owe a debt of gratitude to his mother, who told him, “You won’t! You can’t. You mustn’t!” He wrote most of his Holmes stories between 1890 and 1893. In December of 1893, he had Holmes and Moriarty plunge off Reichenbach Falls—the outcry was so great he had to bring back Holmes, and went on to write several Holmes and Watson novels. He was successful with his historical fiction novels, written before, during and after his Holmes stories and novels.

Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson. Published in The Adventure of Silver Blaze, which appeared in The Strand Magazine in December 1892.” – created by Sidney Paget (1860-1908)

He wrote two works on the Boer War, which probably gained him a knighthood from Edward VII. He personally investigated two unsolved cases, resulting in exonerating both of the men convicted of the crimes. His actions in these cases led to legal reform in the U.K.

After the deaths of several members of his family, including his son Kingsley, he fell into depression and became interested in spiritualism, where he found solace from his grief. He died from a heart attack on July 7, 1930. There is a statue of Sherlock Holmes in Edinburgh, close to where he was born. The epitach on his grave stone reads:

Blade straight
Steel true
Author Conan Doyle
Knight, Patriot and Man of Letters

Read the rest of this entry

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

By Lindsay Roseberry, Reference DepartmentReadyPlayerOne RD 1 finals 2

Wade Watts is a normal teenager growing up in the Midwest on the future Earth in 2044, after the nation’s collapse.   He is an orphan, living with his aunt, and attending high school online. He plugs into the OASIS, a virtual galaxy of planets and worlds. The creator of the OASIS, James Halliday, died not long past and left no heirs. Instead, he set up an Easter Egg (a hidden message with clues) in the OASIS, with the instructions that the one who finds this egg is his heir. Heir to the OASIS, heir to his programming technology and heir to his millions.

Of course, this sets off a massive stampede of all ages to find the egg. There is even a nickname for these tireless searchers – egg hunters, which was shortened to “gunter” over time. All serious gunters knew that Halliday loved everything about the 1980s. They all studied as much as they could to learn everything about that particular decade—playing all the games, watching all the movies, reading all the books. Even though Wade is in high school, the OASIS is infinitely more fun and exciting that real life and he is a dedicated gunter.

When he is the first to find the first clue, the story really heats up. There are villains, allies, unexpected friends, danger, excitement, escapes and more to be found in the OASIS. This book was such a quick read. You will want to know what happens and keep reading. Wade (Parzival in the OASIS) leads the reader on a chase through the 1980s to solve three three-step riddles and save the OASIS from the evil Innovative Online Industries, which wants control of OASIS. If you like audio books, I suggest you download the e-audio book from READS; Wil Wheaton (Wesley Crutcher in Star Trek: Next Generation) reads the story and it is very well done.

The film rights to Ready Player One were purchased by Warner Brothers the same day the book was signed to be published. It will directed by Stephen Spielberg!

 


Ready Player One is a science fiction and dystopian novel by Ernest Cline. The book was published by Random House on August 16, 2011.[1] The audiobook is narrated by Wil Wheaton. In 2012, the book received an Alex Award from the Young Adult Library Services Association division of the American Library Association[2] and won the 2012 Prometheus Award.[3] 

Info above from wikipedia…

April is Poetry Month – Why?

By Lindsay Roseberry, Reference Departmentbigpos04

After Black History Month and Women’s History Month were created and were successful in gaining notice, the Academy of American Poets proposed the creation of National Poetry Month.   They actually asked publishers, librarians, poets, teachers and all literary organizations to send representatives to meet and discuss instituting a poetry month.

And so, in 1995, the first National Poetry Month was established. In 2001, the Academy members voted on a poet for a postage stamp. Langston Hughes was the winner; he was the most popular with over 10,000 votes. Later, in 2006, the Academy started Poem in Your Pocket; they posted a new poem everyday on their website for a month. That was so successful; they now post a poem every day. They also will email a poem a day to those who sign up for it.

So why are people so passionate about poetry? Why did they want a whole month to talk about and promote poetry?

How else can you create an image in your mind with words? Image trying to write a paragraph about these poems and the pictures they convey. Sometimes poems say more in images that a paragraph can say.

The fog comes in on little cat feet.
It sits looking over harbor and city
on silent haunches
and then moves on.
by Carl Sandburg

so much depends
upon

a red wheel
barrow

 glazed with rain
water

 beside the white
chickens

by William Carolos Williams

I broke your heart.
Now barefoot
I tread on shards.
by Vera Pavlova

Shake and shake
The catsup bottle.
First a little–
And then a lott’l.
by Richard Armour

the moon so pure
a wandering monk carries it
across the sand

by Basho (Japanese Haiku master)

Poems make you see pictures or feel something; they can also help you get your feelings out. Not all poems have to rhyme. They don’t have to go on and on. If you like structure, try a haiku. Haiku should be seventeen syllables, in three lines of five, seven and five. It is traditionally written about nature. Google haiku and get inspired.

This year, during April 2015, we hope you pay attention to what you see and feel and just perhaps you might try to find a poem that matches you r feelings. Or perhaps write one just for yourself. It’s easier than you think. Think about subscribing to poem-a-day from http://www.poets.org.

You could participate in Put a Poem in Your Pocket, on Thursday, April 30. All you need to do is find a poem you like and share it with others: you could add it to your email footer for one day or you could send to school with your child or teen. You could post it at work, on the bulletin board or on email or tweet about a favorite poet, or poem.

Just one day. Surely we can all handle that!


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Delicious by Ruth Reichl

By Lindsay Roseberry, Reference Librarianows_139898376043329

Billie Breslin came from California to work in New York at the magazine Delicious! She loved food and had a nose for identifying herbs and spices. This was her dream job, writing articles about food(s) and places. And she didn’t have to cook! She became like family to an artisanal cheese store,, working on the weekends to augment her meager salary. She was also in charge of the Delicious Guarantee, where she contacted readers who had trouble with recipes. She made friends with these (mostly) women and loved her job.

Then the unbelievable happened. The owners of the magazine decided to stop production! She was able to stay on to continue the Delicious Guarantee. She was the only employee left in the ramshackle old house and she explored by herself, and then a few other former employees joined her—surreptitiously. She found a secret room, with letters from someone named Lulu. Who was Lulu? Can she get all the letters copied and safe before the house is renovated? Can she keep the secret room hidden?

This was the first book I’d ever read by Reichl. She is well-known for her non-fiction books about food and restaurants. She was edition of the New York Times restaurant section, and worked at Gourmet magazine until its untimely demise, similar to what happened in the book. I enjoyed it more than I thought I would. The characters are warm and individual and the back stories are fun.

Things You Never Knew About St. Patrick’s Day

By Lindsay Roseberry, Reference Department

  • St. Patrick indeed lived in Ireland, but he was born Scottish; he was captured and sent to Ireland to be a slave
  • He went back to his home after fleeing his servitude and answered God’s call, and went back to Ireland to convert the heathen
  • He may have used the shamrock to teach the pagan Gaels about the trinity—triunes were very popular in Irish Gaelic/Celtic belief (and gods)Irish_clover
  • For this holiday, the ban on drinking and eating rich foods was lifted by the church, which made it a most riotous holiday
  • Even though the tradition is for everyone to wear green, it really is supposed to be the Catholics who wear green. The Protestants are supposed to wear orange on St. Patrick’s Day
  • The first St. Patrick’s Day in the United States marched on March 17, 1762 by Irish soldiers serving in the English army, before the American Revolution!
  • The shortest St. Patrick’s Day Parade is in County Cork – it is only 100 yards, stretching from one pub to the other
  • The holiday has been celebrated in space! In 2011, Catherine Coleman, who is Irish-American, played a flute and a pipe lent to her by members of The Chieftains
  • Corned beef and cabbage is the traditional meal for St. Patrick’s Day
  • Most people may be familiar with Dublin, Ohio, but there are several towns named for St. Patrick and Ireland in the United States:
    • St. Patrick, Missouri
    • Ireland, West Virginia
    • Clover, South Carolina
    • Shamrock, Texas
    • Limerick, Maine

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The Storied Life of A J Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin

9781616203214_custom-1248f47d7cb47c8f90ffeacbcdc3bf065de3f59b-s6-c30By Lindsay Roseberry, Reference Librarian

A J Fikry is a curmudgeon who owns the only book store on an island off the Eastern seaboard.  He has definite likes and dislikes when it comes to purchasing books for his store. He growled and grouched at the new book representative, who had replaced the only real friend he had. He hadn’t even known the man had died. His wife died a few years ago, and he is still grieving; he drinks himself to sleep almost every night. He lives above the store in a modest apartment. He has gotten into the habit of leaving his bookstore unlocked; he figures there is nothing really worth stealing. It is safe to say the book store is not as popular as it was while his wife was still alive.

One night he took out his retirement nest egg –a book entitled Tammerlane, a very rare Poe work. He drank to excess , as usual, and passed out; when he woke up the book was gone. In a panic, he ran out to try to find it and then called the police. He searched high and low and when he came back, just as he was getting ready to drink again that night, he heard a noise. Someone had left a baby in his store while he was out. There was a note from the mother stating that she thought a bookstore would be a good place to leave Maya since she loved books so much. She also said she just couldn’t take care of her as Maya needed.   The local police officer said he called Child Services, but it wouldn’t be until Monday that they would be able to get to the island.

You’ll have to read the book to find out what happened with A J and the baby.

I really enjoyed this book, which is destined to become a book club classic. It’s great for anyone who likes books and reading.   I thought I knew what would happen, but I was surprised by several developments. Ms. Zevin has written other adult novels and is well known for her Teen novels as well.

Carol O’Connell’s Mallory novels

By Lindsay Roseberry, Reference Librarian

OConnellC-KM-Group01UK_thumb[3]Have you read all three of The Girl Who books? Looking for a new Salander? Perhaps you should try the books by Carol O’Connell featuring Mallory. Kathy Mallory was an eleven year old foundling living on the streets when she was rescued by New York police detective Markowitz. As she grew up, she continued to lack many social skills, including empathy, conversation and humor. She is considered by some a sociopath. One review stated that Mallory is the original Salander. The novels are all full of twists and turns and interesting characters.

The books, in order are Mallory’s Oracle (1994), The Man Who Cast Two Shadows (1995), Killing Critics (1996), Stone Angel (1997), Shell Game (1999), Crime School (2002), The Jury Must Die (2003), Winter House (2004), Find Me (2006) and the most recent book The Chalk Girl (2011). Our library has the entire series.

kathy-mallory

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