Category Archives: Williamson county

County Mayor Issues Executive Order Regarding Face Coverings effective July 8

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On July 3, Tennessee Governor Bill Lee signed Executive Order 54 to grant county mayors in 89 counties the authority to issue local requirements that citizens wear face coverings in public places in order to slow the spread of COVID-19 cases, which have significantly risen in recent weeks. Governor Lee encouraged every Tennessean across the state to use a face covering or mask, to socially distance and wash hands frequently.

After much consideration and after consultation with each of the mayors of the various municipalities in Williamson County, as well as the School Superintendents for the two school districts within the County, Mayor Rogers Anderson finds that there is a consensus that wearing a cloth or other face covering should be required in certain circumstances in Williamson County. Mayor Anderson recognizes that there are many varying opinions on this issue, but believes that asking Williamson Countians to wear a face covering in indoor public places, and in outdoor public places where distancing is not possible, is a necessary safety measure in order that our local businesses may remain open and our schools will be able to open in the fall. …

Please read the full press release and text of the Executive Order.

For more details visit the Frequently Asked Questions webpage about Executive Order 54.

For additional clarification, County Mayor Rogers Anderson issued an Addendum on July 9. Read the Addendum here.

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COVID-19 Testing and Mask Distribution

From The Williamson County Health Department release dated June 29, 2020:

All COVID-19 tests and masks are free to the public, regardless of county of residency. Individuals do not have to present symptoms to be tested. Test results are currently being provided within 4 to 7 days of testing.
“We would like to remind the community that if they are coming to receive a test, they should plan on self-isolating until their test results come back to prevent transmission if results are positive,” said Williamson County Health Director Cathy Montgomery.
WCHD would like to remind the community to follow CDC guidelines by physically distancing and wearing a mask while in public settings. Businesses should continue to follow Governor Lee’s Tennessee Pledge Guidelines which can be found here:

https://www.tn.gov/governor/covid-19/economic-recovery.html

For developing information, individuals can subscribe to Williamson County’s Public Information text opt-in system by texting keyword WCCOVID to 888-777.
TDH is posting updated COVID-19 case numbers by 2 p.m. CDT each day at

http://www.tn.gov/health/cedep/ncov.html.

Find additional information at http://www.tn.gov/governor/covid-19.html and

http://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html.

Visit the Williamson County Emergency Management COVID-19 page online at williamsonready.org/Coronavirus.
Connect with WCEMA on Facebook and Twitter

Excellent Citizens and Notable Partings in Williamson County, Tennessee Book Publication Announcement

What was Special Collections doing during the covid-19 shelter-at-home mandate?

We’re glad you asked! Your Special Collection librarians were right here, working hard on compiling and editing a new book for our department, and for you! As much as we didn’t like the circumstances, we welcomed this time to focus on bringing our work to completion. We fully intend to have our new book available for purchase and/or perusal sometime in June, barring any unforeseen circumstances. 

What is the title?

The long title is: 

Excellent Citizens and Notable Partings: A Further Look at the Popular Series, “Portrait of an Excellent Citizen,” Published in The Review-Appeal, 1966-1968, in Franklin, Tennessee

What made you compile a book? 

Inspiration. It’s as simple as that. Nearly two years ago, an old box of donated items provided  hours of delight and entertainment as we combed through its contents. Among the assorted papers, we found a nearly complete set of Review-Appeal “Portrait of an Excellent Citizen” clippings which, we soon discovered, ran as a series between the years 1966-1968. We were intrigued by this Review-Appeal appointed group of outstanding citizens, so highly regarded that each face was individually hand drawn by Tennessean staff artist, Bill Duke. 

Why these citizens?

Each generation recognizes those among us who stand out, the ones getting things done, the ones everyone either knows or “knows of.” How the Review-Appeal “Portrait of an Excellent Citizen” series came into being is a bit of a mystery, as well as their selection process. It seemed to have just appeared out of the blue, with no introduction and no conclusion. However, once re-discovered, we quickly recognized that this collection of citizen portraits gave us a unique snapshot of Williamson County and some, but not all, of the more visible citizens of the late 1960s, and that in itself was significant. While our nation was in the throes of political turmoil and cultural revolution, it would seem that business and life went on as usual in Williamson County.

Why is this book important?

As we began to wonder how the lives of these “Excellent Citizens” played out and what it would look like to read their end-of-life story, we set out to locate their obituaries and other articles. After compiling a fair amount of additional material, it was easy to see the treasure we had unearthed. We knew if we could get this all into a book, it would become an important resource for present and future researchers in finding family connections and aiding their understanding of these citizens and their place in our midst. For added interest, we threaded in ads of the era found in the Review-Appeal, The Williamson Leader, and the local Franklin phone directory. We also used quotations and excerpts from other local sources whenever possible.

Are any of the Excellent Citizens still living?

Yes, only about 10. For those citizens who are still living, we sent letters or called asking for their help, or their family’s help, in creating an updated entry for them. Most were happy to do so. And as word got out, some families of those citizens already gone were eager to help as well. In that way, we were able to amass original and important additional content for many of our living and deceased Excellent Citizens.

Are there other books about local people from Williamson County?

Yes, there are quite a few wonderful biographies, and several narratives of life in Franklin which are very  entertaining as well as factual. We are eager to point out to our readers works such as Who’s Who in Williamson County by Jane Bowman Owen, Who’s Who in Williamson County by Nat Osborne, Jr., and Who’s Who in Williamson County by Derry Carlisle, reprints of the Review-Appeal column of the same name published over a span of 35 years, all colorfully written and re-published by Rick Warwick. We also encourage our patrons to read the narratives of locals who have chronicled their own lives in Williamson County during this era, and in doing so, have animated the lives of many other citizens, some featured in our book. Look for works by Leonard Isaacs, Russ Farnsworth, Bill Peach, Bobby Langley, Jimmy Gentry, W.C. Yates, and others. Many of these are available to check out at WCPL.

Why are these 143 citizens important?

In today’s world, we have “social media” and “influencers,” but these men and women of the late 1960s were influential — they were doers, and their lives reflected their interaction with and influence in the community. For a time, they were all here in this one place, together, the stalwarts of their day. We hope this book, which we have painstakingly compiled and edited, will provide its readers and researchers with a useful resource as well as a source of memories of a time gone by, now known as The Sixties. 

Watch for details about our new book, Excellent Citizens and Notable Partings, coming out soon!

From the Special Collections Department

Marcia P. Fraser and Ashleigh M. Florida

Covid-19 and Tips for Caregivers

For those living with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia and their caregivers, navigating the COVID-19 pandemic presents a unique challenge. Many Tennesseans are currently not able to visit their loved ones living in memory care facilities and family caregivers with loved ones in the home may feel more isolated than ever before.

The Alzheimer’s Association stands ready to help families in the Williamson County community, and statewide, who are impacted. In addition to ​advocating for vital public policies to protect long-term care residents and workers​, the Alzheimer’s Association has also released guidelines and tips to support Tennesseans through this crisis.

If you’re a family caregiver for someone living with Alzheimer’s or dementia, these tips can help you and your loved one stay healthy:

  • For people living with dementia, increased confusion is often the first symptom of any illness. If a person living with dementia shows rapidly increased confusion, contact your health care provider for advice. Unless the person is having difficulty breathing or a very high fever, it is recommended that you call your healthcare provider instead of going directly to an emergency room. Your doctor may be able to treat the person without a visit to the hospital.
  • People living with dementia may need extra and/or written reminders and support to remember important hygienic practices from one day to the next.
  • Consider placing signs in the bathroom and elsewhere to remind people with dementia to wash their hands with soap for 20 seconds.
  • Demonstrate thorough hand-washing.
  • Alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol can be a quick alternative to hand-washing if the person with dementia cannot get to a sink or wash his/her hands easily.
  • Ask your pharmacist or doctor about filling prescriptions for a greater number of days to reduce trips to the pharmacy.
  • Think ahead and make alternative plans for the person with dementia should adult day care, respite, etc. be modified or cancelled in response to COVID-19.
  • Think ahead and make alternative plans for care management if the primary caregiver should become sick.

If you or a loved one are living in a residential care facility, the Association recommends the following:

  • Check with the facility regarding their procedures for managing COVID-19 risk. Ensure they have your emergency contact information and the information of another family member or friend as a backup.
  • Do not visit your family member if you have any signs or symptoms of illness.
  • Depending on the situation in your local area, facilities may limit or not allow visitors. This is to protect the residents but it can be difficult if you are unable to see your family member.
  • If visitation is not allowed, ask the facility how you can have contact with your family member. Options include telephone calls, video chats or even emails to check in.
  • If your family member is unable to engage in calls or video chats, ask the facility how you can keep in touch with facility staff in order to get updates.

Additionally, the Alzheimer’s Association has shifted their educational and support programming to a virtual format, including recurring programs in partnership with the library. You can find a full schedule of t​hose programs here.​

And finally, remember you are not alone. The Alzheimer’s Association offers a free, 24/7 Helpline where you can reach a master-level clinician for support or advice. Call 800-272-3900 to get connected.

WCPLS Branches Reopen with Modifications to Hours and Services

book reader with  face mask
Book Reader with Face Mask

As of June 15, 2020 the Williamson County Public Library will be open for limited hours. Patrons may enter their Library Branches in Franklin, Fairview, and Nolensville Monday-Friday from 10-6 and on Saturday from 10-1. Our Bethesda and Leiper’s Fork Branches are open Tuesday-Friday from 11-6 and on Saturday from 10-1.

Our College Grove Branch will not reopen and only offer Holds-2-Go.

Holds-2-Go curbside service  has been implemented at all Library Branches. It is offered at the Main Library in Franklin, Fairview and Nolensville from 9-10, Monday to Saturday. Bethesda and Leiper’s Fork Branches offer it from 10-11, Tuesday to Friday, and  9-10 on Saturdays.

Learn more about Holds-2-Go

All patrons will have their temperatures checked with a touchless thermometer and be asked five health questions by staff before they can enter their Library Branch.  Patronage at the Main Library will be limited to 50 people per hour to ensure the ability to social distance while inside.  It is required that patrons wear a face mask in the facility until all social distancing safety measures are installed.  Some areas of the Main Library will have a smaller occupancy level due to the size of the space. 

Library patrons will have access to all public areas of the facility excluding the meeting room and Williamson Room.  It is recommended that visitors look online for their materials so they can quickly locate and borrow them.  Visits should be limited to one hour or less so that others may enter the facility.

Other changes include:

  • Patrons will exit via the Main Library Entrance and must enter via the Meeting Room to be screened by staff prior to their visit.
  • Directional signage for moving about the Library is posted on shelves and other areas.
  • Library staff are wearing face coverings.
  • Plexiglass has been installed at service desks to ensure the safety of patrons and staff.
  • 6 foot distance markers are on the floor at the service desks.
  • Staff will look up materials and provide call numbers for the public. Patrons may look for the books themselves or stay at the service while staff retrieve the materials.
  • 6-8 computers are available in the reference area for one hour increments.  Call 615-595-1243 to schedule a time. 
  • There will be a cleaning of high touch areas every two hours. 
  • Seating has been reduced to allow for social distancing.
  • Suspension of face to face services such as story times, exam proctoring, notary service, and one-on-one assistance at the computers.  Please visit the website to see what services have moved online at http://wcpltn.org
  • The train table in the Children’s Department and other interactive activities have been stored away for the time being.
  • AWE stations in the Children’s Department will be unavailable. 
  • Food and drink are not allowed in the facility anywhere.
  • Returned items must be deposited in the outside book drop. Patrons can call 615-595-1277 to make an appointment to facilitate the return of items that cannot be put in the book drop.  
  • Water fountains are unavailable.

All materials will be available and patrons should take appropriate precautions in handling items. We ask that all handled library material be left out for staff to pick up, along with all returned library items, they will be quarantined for three days prior to their return to the shelf.  

Magazines and newspapers will not be quarantined.  It is recommended that patrons use gloves in handling those items. The Library does not have gloves to provide.  It is recommended that patrons looking for magazines utilize the free Flipster  app and the Tennessee READS apps, Overdrive and Libby.  Flipster and READS can also be enjoyed on a computer.

Please visit our website for up-to-date information. The Williamson County Public Library System will continue to expand digital offerings such as virtual Facetime Live Story Times and digital Reference appointments.  Updates are also available by subscribing to your Branch’s online newsletter, https://www.wcpltn.org/277/Newsletter-Sign-Up, and by following WCPLtn on Twitter and Facebook.  Further announcements regarding changes of hours and in services will be made via these channels.

WCPLS Memorial Day Closing on May 25

Library2Go will be unavailable on Monday, May 25, as all Branches of the Williamson County Public Library System will be closed.

Please join us in observing the Williamson County Memorial Day Service at 10 am online due to the Pandemic.

“Due to the current COVID-19 Pandemic and Governor Lee’s Executive Order No. 17 and The Tennessee Pledge, the annual Memorial Day Service will not be held as a live event at the county’s Veterans’ Park for 2020.  Instead the Memorial Day Service will be produced for broadcast by the county’s WC-TV personnel.”

For more information: http://www.williamsoncounty-tn.gov/calendar.aspx?eid=5285

Library2Go services will resume on Tuesday, May 26, at all Branches. 

Williamson County COVID-19 Testing Site Closed for Memorial Day

The Williamson County Health Department (WCHD) COVID-19 testing and mask distribution site at the Williamson County Agricultural Center will be closed for Memorial Day on Monday, May 25th.

“Please join us in using this holiday to reflect on the sacrifices that our military personnel have made for our Country,” said Williamson County Health Department Director, Cathy Montgomery.  The health department has been using national and state guard medics and administrative personnel to assist in their testing efforts.

Free COVID-19 drive-through testing and mask distribution will resume on Tuesday, May 26th. Following Memorial Day, the Department will continue to provide testing Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Williamson County Agricultural Center located at 4215 Long Lane, Franklin TN.

WCHD would like to remind the community to follow CDC guidelines by physically distancing and wearing a mask while in public settings. Businesses should continue to follow Governor Lee’s Tennessee Pledge Guidelines which can be found here: https://www.tn.gov/governor/covid-19/economic-recovery.html

For developing information, individuals can subscribe to Williamson County’s Public Information text opt-in system by texting keyword WCCOVID to 888-777.

TDH is posting updated COVID-19 case numbers by 2 p.m. CDT each day at www.tn.gov/health/cedep/ncov.html. Find additional information at www.tn.gov/governor/covid-19.html and www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html.

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Visit the Williamson County Emergency Management COVID-19 page online at williamsonready.org/Coronavirus.

Connect with WCEMA on Facebook and Twitter

Sharon’s Book Pile

I’ve just finished a few books that I really enjoyed and I thought you might like to hear about them. I read a little of everything – mysteries, westerns, psychological thrillers, classical literature, historical fiction, nonfiction (especially about gardening, dogs and home décor), humor and lots of horror. I try to switch things up, so if I read a dark or scary novel, I’ll follow that with something really funny or light. 

Three of the books in Sharon's book pile.

Three of the books in Sharon’s book pile.

At the top of my list is Grady Hendrix’s The Southern Book Club’s Guide to Slaying Vampires. It follows Patricia, a typical housewife in 1990s Charleston, and her book club friends as they encounter a mysterious new neighbor who may or may not be a killer…or something worse. The book starts off laugh-out-loud funny, but quickly turns dark and extremely grisly. While Patricia tries to convince her friends and her dense husband that there’s something terribly wrong with the newcomer, she struggles to live up to the ideal of the perfect wife, mother and hostess. I’m not sure which was scarier, the monster next door or the pressure on our heroine to live up to society’s expectations. You can check it out at WCPL (F HENDRIX) and in our eLibrary via R.E.A.Ds. as an ebook and eaudio.

Book cover for The Animals at Lockwood Manor

The Animals at Lockwood Manor, a novel, by Jane Healey

The Animals at Lockwood Manor by Jane Healey is historical fiction with a really creepy touch of Gothic eeriness. Hetty, a young curator at a London natural history museum, is charged with evacuating the museum’s stuffed mammal collection to Lockwood Manor, a huge Downton Abby-type estate, where they’ll be safe from German bombs during the Blitz. She runs afoul of the ruthless lord of the manor and his equally unpleasant staff, but bonds with the lord’s beautiful and troubled daughter, Lucy. Soon Hetty is fighting to save her precious collection, as one mysterious calamity after another befalls them. Could the estate really be haunted by the terrifying spirit of a woman in white, or does something even more sinister threaten Hetty, Lucy, and the irreplaceable mammals? I loved finding out. I listened to the audiobook through Tennessee R.E.A.D.S. It is also available in print (F HEALEY) and in our eLibrary via Tennessee R.E.A.D.S. as an ebook also.

For a really fun page-turner, check out The Other Woman by Sandi Jones. Emily, a successful young business woman, has met the man of her dreams, Adam. He’s crazy about her too. Things go swimmingly until Adam introduces Emily to his mother, Pammie. For reasons Emily can’t fathom, Pammie detests her at first sight and it’s soon clear she will stop at NOTHING to ruin Emily’s life and keep her from marrying Adam. It’s obvious to Emily that her future mother-in-law is a manipulative sociopath, but to the rest of the world, Pammie is an angelic elderly lady, beloved by everyone. It’s fun to guess what outrageous stunt Pammie will throw at Emily next, and there’s also a great plot twist along the way.  I listened to the audiobook through Tennessee R.E.A.D.S.  It is also available in print (F Jones) and in our eLibrary via Tennessee R.E.A.D.S.. as an ebook.

If you’re looking for something darker and more complex, try A Head Full of Ghosts by Paul Tremblay, whose terrifying novel The Cabin at the End of the World was a recent sensation. A Head Full of Ghosts is narrated by a young woman named Merry as she recounts the bizarre events that befell her family 15 years earlier. When Merry is 8, her older sister Marjorie begins exhibiting strange and extremely disturbing behavior. Mom thinks Marjorie needs therapy, but Dad believes Marjorie is possessed and needs an exorcism. Things get REALLY weird and increasingly tense and scary when the family’s situation becomes the subject of a hit reality TV show. Check out a hard copy at WCPL (F TREMBLAY) or you can listen to the audiobook as I did through Tennessee R.E.A.D.S.  It is also available as an ebook in Tennessee R.E.A.D.S. and Hoopla.

My current reads are Stephen King’s latest, If It Bleeds (Available in print and our eLibrary via Tennessee R.E.A.D.S. as an ebook and eaudio.), and Savage Season (Available in print) by one of my favorite authors, Joe R. Lansdale. I’ll report on those in a week or so and suggest some other interesting books as well. 

Happy reading while you’re safe at home!

Sharon

 

COVID-19 Drive-through Testing Continues in Williamson County

Franklin, Tenn. – The Williamson County Health Department (WCHD) is continuing to offer free COVID-19 drive-through testing and mask distribution for the community on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Williamson County Agricultural Center located at 4215 Long Lane, Franklin TN.

MASK DISTRIBUTION

Public health nurses and/or National Guard and State Guard medics will collect nasal swabs for those who want to be tested, and test results may be available within 72 hours after the samples arrive at the lab, depending on lab volume.  Individuals do not have to present symptoms to be tested.  Masks will continue to be distributed while supplies last. 

In an effort to plan for potentially high testing turnout, large businesses recommending their employees be tested are encouraged to call the Williamson County Public Information line at (615) 595-4880. The line is operational Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Businesses are asked to provide an approximate number of employees that desire to receive a test.

WCHD would like to remind the community to follow CDC guidelines by physically distancing and wearing a mask while in public settings. Businesses should continue to follow Governor Lee’s Tennessee Pledge Guidelines which can be found here: https://www.tn.gov/governor/covid-19/economic-recovery.html

For developing information, individuals can subscribe to the  Williamson County’s Public Information text opt-in system by texting keyword WCCOVID to 888-777.

TDH is posting updated COVID-19 case numbers by 2 p.m. CDT each day at www.tn.gov/health/cedep/ncov.htmlFind additional information at www.tn.gov/governor/covid-19.html and www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html.

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Visit the Williamson County Emergency Management COVID-19 page online at williamsonready.org/Coronavirus.

Connect with WCEMA on Facebook and Twitter

Williamson County Clerk’s Office Promotes Online Services

Williamson County Clerk Online Services Page

Williamson County has been moving toward a phased reopening of its offices, while continuing to do its part to assist in the protection of the health and safety of citizens and employees. In an effort to promote continued physical distancing and health best practices, the Williamson County Clerk’s Office would like to remind individuals of the online services it provides.

The Clerk’s Office offers an online portal for tag renewals and marriage license applications. To utilize online services, visit: https://secure.tncountyclerk.com/index.php

Individuals who cannot access the online portal, can visit one of the five Renewal Kiosks at the Williamson County recreational facilities:

  • Fairview Recreation Complex, 2714 Fairview Boulevard
  • Franklin Recreation Complex, 1120 Hillsboro Road
  • Indoor Sports Complex in Brentwood, 920 Heritage Way
  • Longview Recreation Center at Spring Hill, 2909 Commonwealth Drive
  • Williamson County Recreation Complex at Nolensville, 7250 Nolensville Road

Each facility is open according to the following modified schedule:

  • Monday – Friday: 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
  • Saturday: 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon
  • Sunday: Closed

Renewal Kiosks are located in facility lobbies.  Whether entering the clerk’s office or a recreation center lobby, a temporal scan will be administered and every individual must answer 5 questions prior to entering a facility. Any person with a temperature registering greater than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or a positive confirmation to any of the health questions will not be allowed in the facility. Entrance will be based on limited occupant capacities and social distancing practices will be required. Once full occupancy is met, entrance will only be allowed as patrons exit the facility. Patrons are encouraged to bring masks and other protective gear to ensure everyone’s safety.

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Visit the Williamson County Emergency Management COVID-19 page online at williamsonready.org/Coronavirus.

or Text WCCOVID to 888-777 for developing information. 

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