Category Archives: Teens

Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi

71GXQFa+RRLBy Robin Ebelt, Reference Department

I can’t imagine living in a world where birds no longer fly, plants and animals are difficult to keep alive and the weather is even more unpredictable than living in middle Tennessee! The Reestablishment has tried to fix things but they are not being too successful. Seventeen year old Juliette has been locked up in prison and is on the verge of starvation! Now the Reestablishment wants to use her as a secret weapon!

As the plot enfolds, this dystopian/romance definitely entertains. My favorite character is Adam, the love interest, because I love the background story that connects him to Juliette. What intrigues me about this novel is the clever style in which Tahereh Mafi wrote the book. I love the way she crosses out Juliette’s initial thoughts and follows them with a more vanilla version. It is a neat way to hear the truth see what the character is thinking. The book is packed with metaphors and imagery—perhaps a bit overboard but I survived.

I would have to say that I liked this book. I’m still not completely certain of what special “superhuman” power Juliette possesses. How did she get it? How will the Reestablishment try to use it? Why does it affect some people and not others? Will she learn to control it?

I guess that’s what the sequel is for. I just hope it doesn’t veer into the comic hero genre.

Advertisements

Summer Reading at WCPLtn

TEENSRP2014By Erin Holt, Teen Librarian

What a great summer we’ve had at the Library! Our Teen Department had over 450 book reviews submitted and 13 awesome teens won various prizes, including an iPad Mini, Kindle Fire tablets, and Barnes & Noble gift cards! Everyone beat the heat at the library, stopping by our 2nd floor Teen Fiction room to cool off with a good book, play on the computers, and meet up with friends. We’re looking forward to fall and have some exciting new programs including Lego Mindstorm, Minecraft, and Wii gaming! Keep reading and we’ll see you at the Library!

News from our Teen Department

ErinHWe are pleased to announce that Erin Holt is the new Teen Librarian at the Main Library in Franklin. Erin brings with her a Masters in Library Science from Queens College (New York), experience working with teens at the New York Public Library, a love of all things social media, a flare for collection development, and fresh and exciting programming ideas for the teens and tweens of Williamson County. You may know Erin if you’ve stopped by the Reference desk, as she has been with WCPLtn for the past 4 years. Erin can’t wait to connect with the teens both in person and online with various programming initiatives set to launch this year. First up? The new “Imagination Station,” which includes Nintendo Wii, Minecraft, Lego Mindstorm, and other multi-media programs. Between this and other upcoming ideas, Erin plans to turn the Teen Department into a community hub for Williamson County teens. Keep yourself in-the-know & follow @wcplteen14 on Twitter. See you at the Library!

The Pros of Chess

0225By Robin Ebelt, Reference Department

What game gives you constant feedback, shows your psychological strengths and weaknesses and gives you great possibilities for self-improvement? It’s chess, of course. You don’t play? No problem! It’s never too late to learn how to play chess. The Williamson County Public Library has a Chess Club that meets monthly in the Young Adult fiction room. All levels are welcome!

Why should you play chess?

  1. Chess is cheap!
  2. Chess is a game for people of all ages.
  3. Chess develops logical thinking.
  4. Chess develops memory.
  5. Chess improves concentration.
  6. Chess develops analytical, synthetic and decision-making skills, which they can transfer to real life.
  7. Chess shows that success rewards hard work.
  8. Chess is part of the curricula in nearly 30 countries. In Venezuela, Iceland, Russia and other countries, chess is a subject in all public schools.
  9. Chess is always changing. There is always new theory, new players, new puzzles and ALWAYS new game.
  10. Chess is fun!

Come join us! The Chess Club will meet August 2 at 2:00 PM in the Young Adult fiction room. All levels are welcome!

Hush Hush by Becca Fitzpatrick

By Robin Ebelt, Reference Department

hushhushI love a good young adult trilogy, so several of my librarian friends encouraged me to read Hush Hush by Becca Fitzpatrick. This weekend, I finally plowed through it although I felt like I was reading Twilight again. I understand that Hush Hush is a book about the paranormal but this one didn’t do it for me.

Nora Grey, a sixteen year old sophomore, lives pretty much alone. Her father was murdered last year but we are given no details about that. Nora’s mother is on the road with her job leaving her teenaged daughter at home for days at a time. Sure she has a housekeeper/cook throughout the day, but she’s alone at night. Really?

In biology class, the teacher pairs her with the dark mysterious “fallen angel” Patch who literally gets in her head. Thus ensues the reluctant romantic relationship between Patch and Nora. Another creepy guy, Elliot, shows her some interest and hostility without a clear purpose. Even Nora’s best friend, Vee, gets swept along with the excitement of some attention from the new guys at school.

I have to admit that while I didn’t feel connected with the book, I was intrigued enough to finish it. I had to read on to find out who really was the bad guy and I needed some resolution to the weird things that were happening in Nora’s life. I wonder if Nora’s father’s murder might be connected to some of the paranormal activity in this book. I guess I’ll have to read the sequel to find out.

What to Read after “The Fault in Our Stars”

By Howard Shirley, Teen Library Assistant

Did the release of The Fault in Our Stars get you craving more quirky teenage love stories?

Here are five more titles you might enjoy…

Eleaneleanor and parkor & Park by Rainbow Rowell [YA F ROWELL]

This 2013 release beautifully tells the story of two high school misfits who develop a surprising mutual affection during their bus rides to and from school in 1980’s-era Omaha. Though the description may sound trite, Rowell’s writing elevates a familiar story to must-read status.

Amy & Roger’s Epic Detour by Morgan Matson [YA F MAT]amy and roger's epic detour

Matson’s debut novel, Amy & Roger’s Epic Detour is an ode to traveling and new experiences—a love story just happens to pop up along the way. Like in The Fault in Our Stars, dealing with mortality is a theme of this book, though less directly. It’s an entertaining read that will make you appreciate little bits of Americana along the characters’ road trip.

Dash & Ldash and lily's book of daresily’s Book of Dares by Rachel Cohn and David Levithan [YA F COH]

The same duo who paired up for Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist team up again in this fun back-and-forth story of two bibliophiles who exchange thoughts via a notebook in a bookstore. Of course, the suspense and excitement leading up to their potential real-life meeting is the central purpose of the book, but these two authors know how to keep the pages turning throughout.

The Future of Us by Jay Asher and Carolyn Mackler [YA F ASH]the future of us

A teenage romance with a slight sci-fi bent, The Future of Us tells the story of two teens in the nineties who happen to discover their future Facebook accounts when they access the internet for the first time. The future they discover on Facebook is not the one they envision for themselves, which leads to an interesting pursuit of how to reconcile the past, present, and future.

Stargirl stargirlby Jerry Spinelli [YA F SPI]

Stargirl is aimed at a slightly younger set, but it remains an elegant story of the ups and downs of high school popularity and teenage love. Spinelli draws you in and doesn’t let you go as he writes about two very different people who are nonetheless drawn to one another. It’s a quick-read, but it’s worth checking out for the quintessential quirky character, Stargirl herself.

%d bloggers like this: