Category Archives: Library Services

GARDENING BOOKS AT WCPL

By Sharon Reily, Reference Department

Feel Free to Browse!

In the 635 call number range you will find a great assortment of books on all aspects of gardening – from flowers, herbs, fruits and vegetables to organic gardening, water features, roses and container gardening. Have fun browsing for the just the right book!


 

Good Basic Gardening Guides51lwbJmwU-L._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_

American Horticultural Society Gardening Manual (635 AME)

Square-Foot Gardening by Mel Bartholomew (635 BAR)

The Garden Primer by Barbara Damrosch (635 DAM)

How to be a Gardener by Alan Titchmarsh (635 TIT)

Rodale’s Illustrated Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening (635.0484 ROD)

The Southern Living Garden Book (635.9 SOU)


 

514c5x57xqL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Books for Tennessee Gardeners

Best Garden Plants for Tennessee by Sue Hamilton (635.0975 HAM)

50 Great Flowers for Tennessee by Judy Lowe (635.0975 LOW)

Tennessee & Kentucky Month-by-Month Gardening by Judy Lowe (635.09768 LOW)

Guide to Tennessee Vegetable Gardening by Walter Reeves (635.09768 REE)

Herbs, Fruits & Vegetables for Tennessee by James Fizzell (R 635.0975 FIZ)


Gardening Magazines

416297494_370

Country Gardens (PER COU)

Fine Gardening (PER FIN)

Organic Gardening (PER ORG)

Advertisements

Making the Most of the Online Kid’s Page: TEL4U

By Lance Hickerson, Reference Assistant

The Kid’s Page has some very helpful homework tools, such as TEL4U.1

You can use TEL4U to answer questions like the following:

  1. What if I need access to a good source of information like the World Book Encyclopedia?
  2. Is there an encyclopedia that plays to the level of younger students?
  3. Is there a place I can find games for children to play?
  4. Is there a place for phonics? I want my child to practice sounding out words and practicing phonics skills.
  5. Where can I go to get Homework Help?

 

Back to Top


1. What if I need access to a good source of information like the World Book Encyclopedia?2

No problem. Go to the free online source on the Kids Page from the Tennessee Library Association called TEL4U. Check out the Home Screen below which shows links to eBooks, Homework Helpers, Look it Up, Tennessee State History, and Games & Activities. This is especially for grades K – 5. (For older children notice the Teenagers link.) The easiest way to get into the World Book Encyclopedia is to click on Look It Up and then choose World Book Student. Enter a word or phrase to find articles on what interests you.

Back to Top


2. Is there an encyclopedia that plays to the level of younger students?

Younger students, K thru 2nd grade might enjoy getting to their age friendly Encyclopedia through eBooks and the Early World of Learning. To get to the Encyclopedia, Click on eBooks and open the first eBook called “Early World of Learning.”3

The link opens into a delightful Early World of Learning page with things to Read, Play, Watch, and to Print & Do. These are full of information and of interest. And don’t miss clicking on the frog. But to get to the illustrated Encyclopedia, go to the bottom left of the Early World of Learning page and click on Worldbook Products.4

After clicking on World Book Products, choose the top right option: Info Finder.5

Info Finder opens into the Encyclopedia. Enjoy browsing the many options.6

Bonus: What happens when I click on the Early World of Learning frog?7

It takes us to Nursery Rhymes, Songs, and Story Corner!8

Back to Top


3. Is there a place I can find games for children to play?
TEL4U has a link called Games & Activities for several sites with games.games

Back to Top


4. Is there a place for phonics? I want my child to practice sounding out words and practicing phonics skills.
Yes. The Starfall.com site under ebooks.10

From the TEL4U homepage click on eBooks. Then choose Starfall.com.

Back to Top


5. Where can I go to get Homework Help?
Click on Homework Helpers from TEL4U home page. This opens access to four sites that offer help with homework.12

What’s in the databases for homework help?

A) The Internet Public Library for Kids aims to be online information you can trust.13

B) The World Book Kids is a geat place to start. See info above on encyclopedias.
C) The Learning Express Library is very popular with adults, but it also has homework practice in math skills and reading comprehension for elementary students.14

D) Kids InfoBits is an exciting database designed especially for students in kindergarten through grade 5. It is part of the TEL4U site, but also has its own direct link on the Library Kids page.15

For instance, a student could click on Music and Movies, then choose Popular Movies. The student would then see the list of movies which are covered as seen below.16

If the student chose “The Chronicles of Narnia,” the following information would be seen:17

If the student chooses to learn about People, the following would appear as options:18

In addition to the above options, there are also other areas for study.
Students will benefit from this accessible database for homework assignments or simply browsing from curiosity.19

Back to Top

Take advantage of the library’s free database: Oxford Reference Online.

By Jessica Dunkel, Reference Assistantreference

We all know Google, the double-edged sword of endless information. It’s fast, free, and extensive, but is it accurate? When you need trusted information fast, Oxford Reference Online is the perfect website.   Your library card grants you access to the latest editions of over 37 encyclopedias completely FREE and accessible 24/7. No more worrying if your teacher will accept Wikipedia as a source. Or, as Honest Abe said:

“Luckily, Oxford Essential Quotations is just one of the 37 encyclopedias at your fingertips!”

Other subject areas include:quotes

Art & Architecture Music Science and Technology
Classical Studies Performing Arts Social Sciences
History Philosophy Society and Culture
Language Reference Quotations
Literature Religion

 

Below are some key features for researching with Oxford Reference:

FUNCTIONALITY TO EXPAND YOUR RESEARCH

  • Library widget: Log in to Oxford Reference quickly and easily, and choose whether to see results from all of Oxford Reference or only full text entries available via your library
  • Annotation Functionality: Select text to highlight and annotate with your own notes. Sign into your Personal Profile where your annotations can be stored and managed under “My Work”.
  • Oxford Dictionaries Online widget: Double click a word and see the free definition in Oxford Dictionaries Online
  • Discoverability tools: MARC 21 records are available at title level, and Open URL increase discoverability and usage of library resources
  • The Oxford Index Underbar: The silver tool at the bottom of your browser offers free search and discovery by generating links to related content from across Oxford’s online resources. For more information about the Oxford Index watch our video or go to http://www.oxfordindex.oup.com

FLEXIBLE USER EXPERIENCE

  • Tools to Refine Your Search: Narrow your search/browse results with a multitude of subject or reference type filters and select “Book” or “Entry” to see your results displayed in your preferred format. Choose to see “Full Text Results Only” by checking the box on the search results page.
  • Options for Customization: Keep your research organized by saving your research journey, favorite titles, and entries in your “Personal Profile,” located in the top right-hand corner.
  • Share Content: With integrated tools including social bookmarking, email, and citation export
  • Leave Feedback: You can now leave feedback about how useful you found entries in Oxford Reference using the box at the bottom of every entry

 Other handy (and free) research tools include:

  • Historic Timelines: 270 historic timelines organized by time period, area, and theme, with each event linked to a free entry in Oxford Reference.
  • Essential Quotations: Oxford Essential Quotations is always unlocked and accessible to global users.
  • Subject Overviews: Over 300,000 pages defining each unique term in Oxford Reference offer a start to your research journey, with links to related entries.

If you’re conducting a research project, planning a school lesson, or even browsing around to learn something new, do it for free – with confidence – anywhere, anytime – with Oxford Reference Online.

Here’s how:

  • Visit the Library’s home page: http://lib.williamson-tn.org
  • Click on eLibrary Digital
  • Click on Articles and Databases by title
  • From the list of letters, select O-P
  • Use the handy search box to start searching, or click on the Oxford Reference Online link to go to their full website
  • If you’re at the library: you will be automatically logged in
  • If you’re at home: enter your library card number and select Williamson County Public Library

For questions, call the Main Library’s reference desk at 615-595-1243 or stop by and visit us!

NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION HELP

By Robin Ebelt, Reference Department640px-PostcardNewYearsResolutionSoapBubbles1909

Each January, about 33% of Americans resolve to improve themselves in some way. Sadly, less than half of the people stick to their resolutions six months later. How are you doing keeping your goals? Do you need some help sticking to your New Year’s Resolutions? The Williamson County Public Library is here to help! Our elibrary digital databases may have just what you need!

_______

RESOLUTION: IMPROVE YOUR FINANCIAL SITUATION

Learn to invest using Valueline.

_______

RESOLUTION: LOSE WEIGHT/FEEL BETTER

Find up to date information at our Health and Wellness Resource Center.

_______

RESOLUTION: READ MORE

Joining a book club may motivate you to read and help you fit socializing into your schedule.

Check out the book clubs offered at the library.

_______

RESOLUTION: TRAVEL MORE

Learn about your U.S. travel destinations with AtoZtheUSA!

Learn a new language with Powerspeak.
_______

RESOLUTION: LEARN MORE ABOUT THE COMPUTER

Take a computer class at the library or practice your computer skills online with the Learning Express Library

_______

RESOLUTION: START A NEW CAREER

Write a resume, find advice, try the interview simulations, and explore open jobs at Career Transisitons

_______

RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE

To locate volunteer programs across the county visit VolunteerMatch.org.

_______

NEED HELP STICKING TO IT?

Read 7 Psychology Tricks to Make Your Resolutions Stick by Time Magazine.

 


Sources:

11 Free Ways to Enjoy the Holidays at the Williamson County Public Library

By Lance Hickerson, Reference Library Assistantd9890eccdf1d0946cb63a759e5745ba8

  1. Mood Music. Attend a concert of seasonal music by artists like Hannah and Esther DeLadurantey and the Eleganza Strings presenting a Family Christmas Concert on harp and violin.
  2. Come and see Santa with your family, and be sure to bring your cameras for that special photo.
  3. Enjoy a holiday musical like this year’s production of “Cindy’s Magic Snow Globe.”
  4. Take in a holiday movie on the Library’s Big Screen selected Friday Mornings and Thursday evenings.
  5. Save money by borrowing books from the library; and that includes electronic books.
  6. Need a holiday recipe? Take advantage of the library’s entire of wall of cookbooks as well as using our Zinio connection to read cooking magazines free online.
  7. What about some DIY Crafts for that personal touch in gifts? Attend a craft class in making bead bracelets or Christmas tree ornaments.   You might also want to see the good DIY books, ready to borrow for your special project.
  8. Tech Tune-up! Take time out to learn more about computers and technology by attending classes like Microsoft Word, Excel, or our “Appy Hour:” where we learn about choosing the best apps for your tablet or Ipad.
  9. It’s family time. Learn about your family history in a class taught by library archivists called, “Introduction to Ancestry.com.”
  10. Enjoy the special activities for teens, like the Teen Cookie Decorating Party.
  11. Learn French (or German, or Spanish, Italian, Mandarin and more) for your next vacation or just for fun with the library’s free online language program called “Powerspeak.”

Bonus: Find a perfect holiday gift at a reasonable price from the Library’s Academy Park Press. Available at the main library circulation desk are the children’s book, Bucky and Bonnie’s Library Adventure, and the recently published: Bullets and Bayonets: A Battle of Franklin Primer.

The NEW Genealogy and Local History Database!!!

By Jason Gavin, Special Collections Librarian

The Special Collections Department has a new swanky database format with a wealth of genealogy and Williamson County historical information, available here. Below are some highlights of what you can find:

  • Local History News Database: Contains a selection of over 7,000 local news stories, and growing.
  • Obituaries: Contains over 50,000 Williamson County Obituaries and growing.
  • Index to the Edith Whitley Collection: Whitley was a professional genealogist who compiled a wealth of unique family research material in her 50 plus year career in Nashville. This material has not yet been digitized or microfilmed, and is thus unique to the Special Collections department.
  • Databases on Williamson County Births, Cookbooks, Families, Magazines, Maps, Marriages, and Veterans

We are especially strong in local African American history and Genealogy thanks to two outstanding collections; the Thelma Battle Collection and the Richard C. Fulcher Collection. In the Thelma Battle collection, there is a wealth of information on bank records, bills of sale, cemetery records, census records, churches, local community history, craftsmen, deaths, deeds, funeral program index, labor contracts, marriages, politicians, social organizations, slave genealogies, schools, and more – including an index to some of the popular exhibits of her large collection of local African American related photographs. The Richard Fulcher database contains a partial index of that collection, covering County records and court excerpts related to Williamson County African American Families.Database 2 image

Each one of these collections is individually searchable, or you can browse, by clicking on the Collection Links page. What makes this new format really exciting however, are some of the new features available through the Search tab. Using the KEYWORD search tab, we now have the ability to search multiple databases simultaneously. In the dropdown menu, simply hold the “Ctrl” key and click all of the databases you are interested in searching. In addition, the FIELD search tab allows you to be far more specific in searching individual databases than was previously possible.

As always, the Special Collections staff is available to answer any questions you might have in navigating the new format or giving you more information about the specific collections. Reach us at 615-595-1246 or email SPCOLL@williamson-tn.org.

Got FREE magazines!? WE DO!!

484x240xWeb-Banner-,P20Members.jpg.pagespeed.ic.P0iZsrNrM6Ever been on your lunch break, only to realize that you left your book at your desk?

If you have your smartphone or tablet, you can easily download some FREE magazines!

WCPLtn has just purchased ZINIO  and online database of popular magazines that were specially selected  periodicals just for OUR patrons!

AND, we’re always tweaking it,  adding new titles, keeping all of our patrons reading interests in mind!

So check it out! And feel free to call us at 615-595-1243 for more info, or to set up a one-on-one session with one of our reference librarians!

WCPLtn is Books…And much more!

appiconBy Erin Holt, Teen Librarian

Libraries have become so much more than just books in the last few years — many are morphing into community centers, providing resume assistance, career centers, makerspaces, and learning labs in addition to the physical book collection. And online collections including eBooks and eAudiobooks are all the rage (we love our OverDrive READS that’s for sure!)  allowing patrons to access materials right from their tablet or smartphone. This is HUGE this day and age with everyone being on the go! Waiting in the checkout line at the grocery store, browse your OverDrive app and download a book and begin reading instantly! It’s genius and a service that we’re proud to offer  it to our patrons!

In fact, OverDrive is so popular that they have recently made some updates to their app to make things go a bit smoother for everyone! Check out the updates here

photo.jpg But we also wanted to highlight that our Library values books, and our librarians go to great lengths to constantly keep our physical collection of books, DVDs, and magazines up to date. In addition to all of that however, our director, Dolores Greenwald,  hosts a monthly television show ‘Not Just  Books‘ that airs on YouTube. The show focuses on what other services we provide both IN the library and outside the library! Wondering what the Friends of the Library are up to? How we’re celebrating the Sesquicentennial (hint: we wrote a fabulous book!), and what our new Teen Librarian is up to? Click on over

And be sure to bookmark this page —  we’ve got new episodes every month!

And as always, give us a call if you have questions — 615-595-1243

Ancestors Found Behind Locked Doors

shelvesBy Dorris Douglass, Special Collections Librarian

Yes the Special Collections Department does actually have some “locked doors,” but we the staff bring out the material for you, our patrons, to look at “ to your heart’s content.” One set of locked doors are the glass front cabinets in the Williamson Room where we have our Civil War collection of pre-1900 books about the Civil War and by the participants themselves.

Another locked door is our Manuscript Room where we house the Whitley Collection and other collections. Edythe Rucker Whitley (1900-1989) was a professional genealogist in Nashville from 1919 to the early 1970’s. She kept personal carbon copies of the research she did for various clients over a period of more than five decades. She also kept contemporary newspaper clippings of obituaries and articles on World War II soldiers. Helen Sawyer Potts later purchased this vast collection and donated it to the Williamson County Public Library in 1983. The collection consist of 538 acid free boxes containing three note books each .

 

To find out door if your last name is mentioned in the Whitley Collection go to the Library Web page and type your name into the catalog search box in the upper right hand corner of the web page.  The Whitley Collection is usually the last entry to come up, if the name is there.

For example, if you type in Mangrum (a good old Williamson County name) entry number 5 will say “Edythe Rucker Whitley Collection: Box 227.” Try typing in your last name, or as we genealogist call it “surname,” and come to Special Collections. And if you are under 50 years old, you will also learn what a carbon copy was before the days of Xrox and photo copiers.

Supporting School Age Children and their Reading at Williamson County Public Library Children’s Section

By Liz Arrambide, Children’s Librarian

Frequently Asked Questions

What resources are available at the library to help my children find books that they can read?

Answer: We have lists available in the Children’s Section that are some of our favorite books for different grade levels. Feel free to ask us where they are. These are also available on our website. Click on our Kids page. On the right you’ll see “Let’s Read Books Lists”. This will link you to lists of books by grade level.

My child is reading at a specific reading level. How can I find books with that reading level and are your books color codes by reading level?

Answer: Many schools use Accelerated Reader (AR) reading levels. The child takes a STAR test on the computer. AR reading levels are given in two numbers such as 3.2. The first number is the grade level.   In this case the child is reading at a third grade reading level. The second number is the month. This child is reading at a third grade, second month reading level. We do not have the books color coded by reading level.

You can use our on-line catalog to find books by AR Reading Level.

  1. Go to our website: http://lib.williamson-tn.org/
  2. On the left put your cursor on “Find books and more”.
  3. Click on “Classic Catalog”.
  4. In the first box that says “title”, use the down arrow and change it to read “ keyword”.
  5. Determine the interest level of your child. Select one of the following.
    1. LG (lower grades) Kinder thru 3rd grade
    2. MG (middle grades) 4-8th grades
    3. MG+ (Middle Grade Plus) 6-8th grades
    4. UG (upper grades) 9-12 grades
  6. Write the AR in capital letters. Then enter the interest level also in capitals. Then write the numeric level. So I would write: AR LG 3.2 and up comes a list of all the books at that level.
  7. You can limit it by Selecting Children’s. Then click on “modify search”. Put a check on” limit search to available items”. Select the “location” you want.
  8. This method works fairly well. Sometimes books that are at other reading levels also are pulled up. Double check that the BL (book level) is the one that you are looking for.

There is also good website: The AR Bookfinder

This site can also help you find the AR Book level for books that you have at home. You can also use it to find the AR reading level of the books on our reading lists.  They now also have the Lexile level.

My children prefer to browse looking for books. How can I help them find books that are not too hard or too easy?

Answer: Have the child open the book and read a page. The child holds up a finger for every word missed. If more than five words are missed on a page, the book is too hard. This is often called the 5 finger rule. You can also tell by how fast or slowly the child reads. If she is reading the text very slowly and not missing any words, it still could be hard for her to read a chapter book at this speed. Try a book a little easier.

At school my child has a DRA reading level. How do I find books at that reading level?

Answer:

  1. The DRA test is given by the teacher rather than by a computer test, such as the AR Star test. Here is a chart that gives the reading levels by various reading programs/tests.
  2. Here is an article that explains about how to find books using the DRA level.

How do I find a book using Lexile Reading Levels?

Answer:

  1. Here’s a good article.
  2. This website finds books according to Lexile.
  3. In the Williamson County Library Catalog follow the directions of #3 above.  Instead of putting in an AR Reading level, write the number of lexile followed by Lexile. So if you write 830 Lexile you will get a list of books that we own at that level.

My child is struggling with the basics of reading. How can I help him learn to read?

Answer: There is an excellent website named Progressive Phonics.  It has a systematic collection of books that teach you how to instruct your child. The books are in color. They are funny and have parts for you to read aloud and for your child to read out loud.

What are some fun ways to learn the words they don’t know?

Answer:

  1. Notebook: You can keep a notebook and offer to write down the words that your child doesn’t know. This way you know what patterns need to be taught or reviewed. If you need to, you can look them up on the Progressive Phonics website.
  2. Play Memory: Make 2 flash cards on index cards for each of 10-15 words. Mix the cards up and turn the cards over. Each person takes a turn, flipping over two cards at a time. When the person finds a pair, he keeps them until the end of the game. The person with the most pairs at the end of the game, wins.
  3. Personal Speller: Make on a computer or in a notebook, a personal speller. This is a list of words in alphabetic order that the student has trouble understanding or spelling. This helps the student learn to read and spell the words and is very handy to have for writing assignments. This works well for older students.
  4. Post words that are being learned on the refrigerator or on a dry eraser board.
  5. For difficult words or word patterns, find a little tune to use as a memory devise. The B-I-N-G-O part in the song Bingo works well for the “ight” word family.
  6. For words that may be difficult to learn, may try writing the word using art supplies. Words like “though” might be hard to learn, but fun to do in crayon, glitter and glue. Spending the time on each letter might help make a connection. This can be hung on a cabinet, so it is easily seen.

My child is reading above grade level. How do I find books that are appropriate for his/her maturity?

Answer: We have grade level lists. These books are appropriate even for younger children. We often suggest lists that are above the grade level that match their reading level.

We know our child’s reading level. Does she/ he have to read at that level all the time?

Answer: Particularly children who are reading above their grade level find that they like to read at different reading levels. Sometimes they will read books that their peers are reading. Sometimes they enjoy quick, fast reads. Other times they want a challenge. It is good for students to read at various levels. This way they’ll read books that are meant for their age group as well as enjoy the challenge.

My child’s teacher says that although he is in third grade, he reads at an eighth grade reading level. How do I find appropriate books?

Answer: This is a challenge. One way to approach it is to find books at the next reading level up. So in this case, it would be fourth grade. If he stretches up to eighth grade, he’s going to miss a lot of great books and be in material that he’s not ready for. Going through the fourth grade and then the fifth grade lists, he’s going to have a lot of fun and occasionally will find a more challenging read and enjoy it. Another great resource is The Volunteer State Book Award lists. These are books and authors that are selected by librarians across the state for their great writing and have been published in the last few years. The kids vote on their favorites at the end of the year. We keep lists from preceding years, because these books are still great books and we have lots of copies.

I want to read out loud to my kids. What are good books to read?

Answer: Parents often find that it helps to read one grade level above where the children are. This way, they are exposed to ideas and vocabulary that the parent can explain.

If you need help, feel free to ask the Children’s and Young Adult library staff. They’ll be glad to make suggestions. Have a great adventure!

 

%d bloggers like this: