Category Archives: Holidays

Christmas’ Motivating Monsters: a.k.a., Santa’s Rogue Gallery

By Lance Hickerson, Reference Department

WARNING! Dangerous, do not approach. If seen, call Santa immediately.

**The Rogues Gallery is the cast of colorful and numerous Recurring Characters that show up to torment the heroes week after week.**

Zwarte Piet, (aka. Black Pete)

Active Areas: Belgium, Netherlands

Bio: He was formerly a Moorish servant from Spain, or a Turkish orphan, or Ethiopian Slave rescued by Saint Nick and now attending Saint Nick as a helper

M.O.: A Prankster who might whip naughty children with birch wood rods or put coal in their shoes. However, those especially naughty he could stuff in his sack and carry them off to Spain.

 

Père Fouettard, (aka. “Father Whipper”)

Active Areas: France

Bio: This rouge’s chilling past involves his killing and cooking three wealthy children who stayed at his inn. Saint Nicolas ended up resurrecting the three children and bringing Fouettard to repentance. Fouettard then became St. Nick’s helper.

M.O.: For those untouched by the good will of St. Nicolas, Fouettard doles out whippings to children who misbehave.

 

Frau Perchta

Active Areas: Austria, Germany

Bio: Thought to be from a nature goddess who affects humans only during Christmas. She rewards good behavior and punishes bad behavior.

M.O.: Good children might receive a silver piece in their shoes, while naughty children would receive something much, much worse. She would take out their insides by slitting open their bellies, and replace their entrails with garbage, straw and rocks which are sewn up to cause grievous pain. Oh for a mere lump of coal!

 

Hans Trapp

Active Areas: Alsace; Lorraine France

Bio: Trapp was supposedly a real man who was exiled into the forest where he would disguise himself as a straw-stuffed scarecrow and cannibalize children.   He was struck down with lightening by the Lord.

M.O.: Trapp accompanies Santa to punish naughty children with beatings.

 

Gryla

Active Areas: Iceland

Bio: She is a giant ogress who has powers that let her detect children who misbehave. Her favorite food is a stew of rebellious children.

M.O.: She is full of mischief and trouble, and likes to eat children who disobey their parents.

 

The Yule Cat

Active Areas: Iceland

Bio: The Yule Cat is ogress Gryla’s pet. And she is likewise dangerous and threatening.

M.O.: The Yule Cat encourages hard work. Children who do not work hard and are lazy will be eaten by the Yule Cat.

 

Belsnickel

Active Areas: Germany

Bio: Belsnickel is from the word belzen meaning “to wallop,” along with nickel referring to St. Nicholas.

M.O.: He is a wandering man dressed in tattered furs wearing a mask and carrying a switch to frighten children into good behavior. He rewards good behavior with candy.

 

Krampus

Active Areas: Found especially throughout the Alpine region and including Austria, Bavaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovenia

Bio: The half goat, half demon appearance of Krampus seems most likely to have grown out of early Alpine traditions related to the Horned God of the Witches of the region. Krampus eventually becomes a “side kick” of St. Nicholas in a rogue sort of way.

M.O.: He especially punishes unruly children with birch switches. But for really bad children Krampus might put them in a basket, drown them in a stream, and then devour them.


Sources:

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Guest Post: Have a Healthy Christmas!

8760623100_c7f6553d6b_bBy Patsy Watkins MPS, CFCS

Family & Consumer Sciences Agent, UT/TSU Extension, Williamson County

Every family has traditional holiday foods. Instead of using the holidays as an excuse for high-fat, high calorie feasting, use these 5 easy tips to remake your holiday favorites with good health in mind.

Holiday Tip #1: Control Portions

Set the holiday table with dinner plates 9 inches or so in diameter. No one will notice a decrease in portion sizes when you use smaller plates and glasses. Cut cake into 18 servings, make 4 dozen smaller cookies instead of 3 dozen larger ones, and use 4-ounce glasses for your favorite sparkling punch.

Holiday Tip #2: Double Up on Vegetables

Serve vitamin-packed, lower carbohydrate vegetables like asparagus, Brussels sprouts, or broccoli in large bowls. Put higher calorie mashed potatoes and winter squashes in smaller bowls and use a smaller serving spoon. Your family will unknowingly serve themselves smaller portions. Instead of meatballs and cheese logs, feature vegetable appetizers like marinated mushrooms, tomato bruschetta, roasted asparagus, etc.

Holiday Tip #3: Give Healthful Gifts

Give homemade gifts that are made with healthful ingredients. Bake breads that feature whole grains, send a basket of fresh fruit instead of a box of candy, or tie a bow around a bag of nuts instead of cookies.

Holiday Tip #4: Lighten Up

Lighten up favorite recipes. Use fat-free evaporated skim milk instead of cream in custard pies and sauces, boost flavor in casseroles with spices instead of butter or salt, and bake foods instead of frying them. No one will notice the changes!

Holiday Tip #5: Make Fruit the Star

Give colorful fruit a starring role. Serve fresh berries for a holiday breakfast, include fresh fruit such as pineapple, mango, kiwi, and red grapes on bamboo skewers for a holiday buffet. Offer dates and grapes instead of cheese and crackers, etc.

Candles, Culture, Faith and Family: A Light Look at Kwanzaa and Hanukkah

By Cindy Schuchardt, Reference Department

A popular holiday song assures us that this is the “most wonderful time of the year” and the “hap-happiest season of all.”1 Many people feel that way because they celebrate Christmas, marking the historical and (Christians believe) blessed virgin birth of the Christ child.  Two other seasonal celebrations, Hanukkah and Kwanzaa, also make this time of the year special for those who practice them. For this reason alone, they merit our recognition and understanding.  While Hanukkah dates back to the second century BCE and Kwanzaa was first practiced in 1966, these celebrations have much in common beyond the double letter combinations in their names – and much to teach us all.

Hanukkah

Hanukkah is an eight-day Jewish festival of lights that began on December 12 this year (2017). The festival commemorates the rededication of the temple in Jerusalem that had been destroyed by the Greek Seleucids.  The Seleucids wanted the people of Israel accept Greek culture and beliefs instead of their own beliefs and religion. The overall theme of the celebration is one of triumph against overwhelming odds. Hanukkah participants now recount the story of how a single day’s worth of olive oil, used to light the Temple’s seven-branched candleholder, miraculously lasted for eight days.

Each night during Hanukkah, a candle is lit on a special candleholder called a menorah. There are nine flames on the menorah – one for each day of the festival and a center flame called the attendant (shamash) that is used to light the other candles.  One candle is lit the first night, two the second night, and so on throughout the festival. The menorah is placed in a window or a doorway; each family has at least one menorah, but some households have a menorah for each person in the home.

Hanukkah is a distinctly religious holiday. Participants sing songs of worship and recite special prayers during the nightly menorah lighting festivities. Menorahs are also lit in Jewish synagogues and in many outdoor public spaces. Hanukkah participants are encouraged to gaze at the lights and think of the lessons they impart.

Food holds a special place in Hanukkah, as well. Fried foods are eaten to remind those present of the miracle of the oil.  Two popular examples are potato pancakes (latkes) and jelly-filled fried donuts (sufganya).

Playing with a dreidel, a four-sided spinning top, is a popular pastime during Hanukkah.  Each side of the dreidel is marked with a Hebrew letter.  The letters used are nungimmelhei and shin, an acronym for nes gadol hayah sham, meaning “a great miracle happened there.”

The giving of gelt (special coins) to children is also part of the tradition.  The idea was to reward children for good behavior and inspire them to learn charity and give to others.  Today, gifts are often exchanged during Hanukkah, as well.

Kwanzaa

Tech. Sgt. Jennifer Myers (above), 66th Air Base Wing noncommissioned officer in charge of the Military Equal Opportunity office, demonstrates a Kwanzaa ritual where she lights a candle in the Kinara.

Kwanzaa is celebrated from December 26 to January 1.  It was founded in 1966 in Los Angeles by Dr. Maulana Karenga, professor of African Studies and activist-scholar. From its important beginnings in the U.S. with African Americans, the holiday has blossomed into recognition by the world African community and is today celebrated on every continent.

Kwanzaa is a celebration of family, community and culture, during which families and community members gather to celebrate Nguzo Saba, which is Swahili for The Seven Principles. Each day marks one of the principles, developed and described by Dr. Karenga as follows:

  1. Unity (Umoja) – To strive for and maintain unity in the family, community, nation and race.
  2. Self Determination (Kujichagulia) – To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves and speak for ourselves.
  3. Collective Work and Responsibility (Ujima) – To build and maintain our community together and make our brother’s and sister’s problems our problems and to solve them together.
  4. Cooperative Economics (Ujamaa) – To build and maintain our own stores, shops and other businesses, and to profit from them together.
  5. Purpose (Nia) – To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their original greatness.
  6. Creativity (Kuumba) – To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.
  7. Faith (Imani) – To believe with all our heart in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.

    NPS Photo

Families who celebrate Kwanzaa choose a central place in the home to display the Kwanzaa Set.  A table is covered with a colorful African cloth, and then adorned with a mat and a special candle holder called a Kinara.  Seven candles are placed in the holder, one black candle representing the people, three red candles represent their struggles, and three green candles represent the future and the hope the results from such struggles (the African liberation colors).  These candles also correlate with the seven principles.

The black candle in the center signifies Unity and is lit on the first day. The remaining candles are lit from left to right on the following days, showing how a unified people move through struggle to hope. Ears of corn and a Unity Cup are also placed on the mat, which is typically surrounded with books on African life and culture, as well as African works of art.

Different Peoples, Different Celebrations, Shared Light

I find it interesting to consider the common elements in Hanukkah and Kwanzaa: the Kinara and the menorah, the candles and the lighted oil, and the daily family observances. In a world that seems to be increasingly dark, there is something about this season inspires us to slow down and consider the lights. We ponder our shared humanity and our bonds as families and communities. I believe that learning about Kwanzaa and Hanukkah and the heritage of those who mark these events can only serve to bring us closer together. Have a blessed season, everyone!

If you enjoyed this glimpse at Kwanzaa and Hanukkah, then you may want to learn more.  The library can help!  Take a look at some of the resources available. Read the rest of this entry

Jólabókaflóð: The Icelandic Holiday tradition That You’ll Want in Your Life

Beowulf from “A book of myths” (1915)

By Lon Maxwell, Reference Department

Jólabókaflóð, or if you prefer your text free of diacritical marks and disused letters, Jolabokaflod, is a tradition that could only come out of Iceland. Literally it translates to Yule Book Flood.  Icelanders read an average of eight books a year, while Americans end up at about four. They also publish about one title for every two hundred people and there is an average of 775 titles released every Christmas season.  This onslaught of reading material is the flood but it’s only part of the tradition.

The actual beginning of this Christmas ritual doesn’t go back very far, though the Icelandic love of books goes back over a thousand years.  Icelanders have always been lovers of stories and tales, especially on the long winter’s long nights. The Skalds, wandering or court poem singers, were held in some renown and acted as the author/rock stars of their day. It was not uncommon for a Skald to be taken with the plunder of war. They filled the great halls of Viking leaders with songs and tales as, sometimes, nightly entertainment from Russia to Greenland. The famous Eddas (two Medieval Icelandic literary works) also carried poetic myths down through the ages and were memorized and recited by scholar after scholar until recorded by a man named Snorri Sturluson[1] to both preserve and enhance their accessibility. Finally the sagas journeyed from land to land taking tales of Thor and Loki (not just Marvel characters) and Beowulf and even Leif Erikson to the people of Scandinavia.

The modern half of the tradition owes its genesis to the independence of Iceland from Denmark in 1944. Because of the Second World War, many things were rationed. This made giving presents at Christmas hard, unless of course, you took advantage of the long standing love of tales and gave books for Christmas. You see, one thing that was not rationed was paper. The Icelandic people and their publishing houses loved the idea. Beginning in the Forties and running down through today, people have been waiting impatiently for their copy of the Bókatíðindi, the magazine/catalog that comes every fall. This magazine is put together by all the publishing houses in cooperation to showcase all the new titles for that year. This is the Sears and Roebuck Christmas book of Iceland. The difference is that the publishers print, package and ship these catalogs to every household in the Nation…for free. The revenue generated more than outweighs the expense. All of the media, print broadcast and online, have book reviews and publication announcements. It is the event of the year.

So what exactly makes this a Christmas tradition? Everybody gives books at Christmas. Everyone. All of Iceland has their Christmas Eve meal, exchanges gifts and then sits around as a family and reads their new books for the remainder of the day while eating konfect, filled chocolates, and sipping hot chocolate or jólabland, a sweet nonalcoholic malt beverage that is a Christmas favorite. The parties that occur after Christmas will have a lot of book discussions. Newspapers will be covering the best and worst of the books, from writing and plots to covers and titles.

We could all benefit from this, but I certainly don’t endorse replacing all your holiday gifts with books. The great thing about borrowed traditions is that you can adapt them to fit your life. I first ran across this tradition on Christmas Eve two years ago. This was a little short notice for 2015 so I decided that I would try it with my family in 2016. Last year we all drew lots in November and picked a book for the person we drew and everybody go to open their book on Christmas Eve. We then spent the remainder of the evening quietly reading. It was a great way to quiet down kiddos, hyped up on Christmas cookies and the pending visit from Santa. It also solved the “Can’t we have just one present tonight?” problem that parents have faced for years. It’s also a great way to foster a love of reading in your whole family.

We are a nation made of other nations and their traditions. We have German Christmas trees, English carols and eggnog, Spanish luminarias and Irish mistletoe. We are not afraid to adapt great traditions from our ancestors, or even our neighbor’s ancestors. Jólabókaflóð is making its way into American holiday plans. You can find everything from recipes to try and hints at adapting the book flood to fit your holidays to Icelandic chocolates and Jólabókaflóð pyjamas.  So maybe this year while you’re out doing the dreaded holiday shopping, pick up some books for your family and friends and borrow a tradition from our Icelandic friends and have a nice reading time on Christmas Eve.


Sources:

[1] Nancy Marie Brown and many other scholars believe that much of the inspiration for modern favorites The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings and their literary descendants come from the tales of the Vikings.

Get Christmas Inspirations At the Library

By Sharon Reily, Reference Department

It’s that festive time of year when you start planning parties, decorating your home, and picking out and wrapping the perfect gifts. If you’re looking for great ideas for holiday entertaining, crafts, decorating, homemade gifts, and recipes, the Williamson County Public Library is a great place to start. The main branch in Franklin and our branches in Bethesda, College Grove, Fairview, Leiper’s Fork, and Nolensville all have books, magazines, electronic resources, and even classes and programs to help make your holiday season jolly!

BOOKS

Crafts

Browse through our Decorative Arts section (call number 745.59412) to find books on hand-crafted gifts, contemporary and vintage Christmas crafts, holiday decorating, and traditions. You’ll see everything from crafting with children to “green” Christmas decorating.

 

Holiday Décor

Make your home warm and inviting for the holidays with these Christmas home décor books, also found at call number 745.59412. Get DIY ideas and tips from top decorators on everything from trimming the perfect tree to creating an elegant centerpiece to crafting wreaths and garlands to using candles to set just the right mood. Happy browsing!

 

Entertaining

Want to host the perfect Christmas gathering? Check out these books on holiday entertaining found primarily at call number 642.4, with a few more in 745.59412. These books combine tips on cooking, decorating and entertaining – everything you need for a fabulous party.

 

Cooking

Food, Glorious Food! WCPL has holiday cookbooks galore. From traditional comfort foods to decadent desserts to healthier holiday fare, you’ll find it at call number 641.5686. Below are just a few sample titles. Happy cooking…and eating!

 

MAGAZINES

In addition to books, WCPL also offers a variety of periodicals featuring great holiday tips. Decorating Digest Craft & Home Projects (PER DEC) has a holiday projects edition each fall. Cooking Light (PER COO) and Bon Appétit (PER BON) focus on holiday recipes in their December issues. We carry several “lifestyle” magazines that go all out in their holiday editions. Southern Living (PER SOU), County Living (PER COU), Real Simple (PER REA), Family Circle (PER FAM), Good Housekeeping (PER GOO), Better Homes & Gardens (PER BET), House Beautiful (PER HOU), Redbook (PER RED), O, The Oprah Magazine (PER O) and more titles all feature recipes, entertaining, decorating, and crafts in their December or winter issues. At the Main Branch in Franklin, the periodicals are on the second floor near the reference section.

DIGITAL RESOURCES

Eager to check out some of our holiday books and magazines but can’t make it to the library? We have digital magazines and eBooks that you can access at home or on the go. Through Tennessee READS-OverDrive you can download eBooks on your computer, eReader, smart phone, or tablet. Tennessee READS offers a huge selection of current titles on Christmas decorating, cooking and entertaining. Stop by the Reference Desk at the Main Branch in Franklin for hands-on assistance setting up your READS-OverDrive account. Instructions for downloading electronic titles are also available at wcpltn.org for the OverDrive app and for Kindle eReaders.

 

DIGITAL MAGAZINES

WCPL also offers digital magazines that you can read on your computer, smart phone, or tablet. Zinio, the Library’s digital magazine collection, has recently merged with RBdigital. Instructions for downloading digital magazines using the RBdigital software and app will be on our website soon.

CLASSES AND PROGRAMS

WCPL offers fun holiday classes and programs. In our “Holiday Newsletter Class” you can learn to create your own holiday newsletter using Microsoft Publisher. You can also take our “Picmonkey Christmas Cards” class to learn how to turn your personal digital photos into holiday cards using the Picmonkey software program.

In our “Crafty Adult” series of programs at the Main branch in Franklin, you can learn to make crafts for all occasions. At the next program on Tuesday, December 5, you’ll be able to create your choice of two 3D Christmas card designs. To sign up for the program, call 615-595-1243, ext. 1 or register online at 3D Holiday Cards.

Pinterest

If the Library’s resources haven’t satisfied your pursuit of holiday perfection, give Pinterest a whirl. Log in to Pinterest and just search for Christmas crafts, decorating, cooking, and entertaining. You’ll find more creative ideas than you can shake a glue gun at.

Don’t Overdo It!

All of our holiday resources should really put you in the Christmas spirit. But don’t go overboard! Debt-Proof Your Christmas: Celebrating The Holidays Without Breaking the Bank by Mary Hunt (322.02402 HUN) can help you enjoy your holiday without stressing over your budget.

HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM WCPL!

10 Black Friday Shopping Tips!

By Rebecca Tischler, Reference Department

  1. 3066235278_3f092ac930Avoid taking naps in front of the store. You might get run over when the door’s open.
  2. Don’t try to wrestle for something with someone twice your size.
  3. Be barely hydrated so that you don’t have to stop for the bathroom.
  4. Bring your entire family so they can carry your stuff (and you can buy more).
  5. Sleep through Thanksgiving so that you’re well rested for the early marathon shopping.
  6. Don’t forget to ask for a gift receipt. Remember, some of it may be on sale for a reason.
  7. Dress in layers, so that you’re warm while you’re waiting to get in, and can remove layers once you’re running and shoving.
  8. Know your budget! You don’t want to buy so many discounted items that you go into debt.
  9. Have a plan of attack. Scope out your favorite stores ahead of time, know which aisles to hit, and provide everyone with a whistle. This way, if anyone in your group gets involved in a tug-of-war, they can call for back-up.
  10. Avoid it altogether, and wait for Cyber Monday when you can aggressively shop for deals from your bed.

And finally – remember to be safe. You don’t want to be part of the mob that always ends up in the next days papers.  So be courteous to the other shoppers and to the employees, which will help to keep a safe environment for everyone.

Mind-bending Monsters in Literature

By Chelsea Bennett, Reference Department

It’s October, and what better time of year to pick out a book that will give you the creeps? Today we’re going to look at five works of fiction that feature terrifying creatures. (Sticklers may feel that some of these descriptions contain spoilers, but I’ve tried not to include any details that aren’t already well-known by horror buffs or pop culture aficionados.)

When it comes to monsters, what frightens me most is a sense of inevitability. A monster doesn’t have to be hideous or enormous to cause you to lose control: think the fatal allure of Dracula, or the overwhelming numbers of a zombie invasion. And what about a creature that can cause you to descend into madness, living — perhaps eternally — after having lost the essence of who you are?

“The Call of Cthulhu”

“In his house at R’lyeh, dead Cthulhu waits dreaming.”

“Cthulhu and the Ninth Wave,” by DeviantArt user “fantasio.”

One creature with such terrifying powers is Cthulhu, first introduced in horror writer H. P. Lovecraft‘s short story “The Call of Cthulhu.” Portrayed as an ancient, dead-but-waiting god, his giant form a strange combination of octopus, bat, and human, Cthulhu embodies a powerful evil. One look at him will drive anyone insane, simply because the human mind cannot comprehend such terror. Unsurprisingly, he is a favorite subject of death metal bands! And you poetry scholars might recognize that Lovecraft seems to have been inspired by Tennyson’s sonnet, “The Kraken.”

Lovecraft’s knack for capturing dread has inspired an entire genre known as “Lovecraftian horror,” described by Wikipedia as “a subgenre of horror fiction that emphasizes the cosmic horror of the unknown (and in some cases, unknowable) more than gore or other elements of shock.”

The Hound of the Baskervilles

“I sprang to my feet, my inert hand grasping my pistol, my mind paralyzed by the dreadful shape which had sprung out upon us from the shadows of the fog.”


“The Hound of the Baskervilles,” by Adam Burke.

Sherlockian scholars consider this Sir Arthur Conan Doyle‘s perfect novel. The tale has been adapted, riffed on, referenced, and parodied dozens of times, taking new forms in every kind of media, including comic books, plays, radio dramas, video games, and more.

How has this story stood the test of time? Sherlock Holmes is, of course, one of literature’s most fascinating characters. But the spectral hound is the real draw. Tied to local legend and a family curse spanning generations, it is an unearthly beast that glows in the dark, pursuing members of the Baskerville family across the moors until they drop dead from fright. But the hound leaves the dead bodies alone. Therefore, the beast doesn’t hunt for food, making its motives inscrutable, but undeniably evil.

Life on the moor is full of secrets and intrigue, both stimulating Sherlock Holmes’ mind and hampering his investigation. Holmes, a man of science, remains skeptical about the supernatural hound’s existence, but he can deny neither the enormous paw prints left in the sodden ground, nor the chilling howls heard in the night. Doyle perfectly paces this novel, increasing the suspense until the climactic moment: the terrifying appearance of the hound!

“The Birds”

“Then he saw them. The gulls. Out there, riding the seas. What he had thought at first to be the white caps of the waves were gulls. Hundreds, thousands, tens of thousands…”

Book cover for Pan Books edition of The Birds and Other Stories, artist uncredited.

You’re probably aware of Alfred Hitchcock’s classic film The Birds, but did you know he based it on a short story by Daphne du Maurier? While not a “monster story,” this is one of my favorite works of suspense. For me, the premise is all the more terrifying for being within the realm of possibility, especially as we see a growing occurrence of natural disasters in real life.

In remote, rugged Cornwall, a wounded war veteran named Nat becomes increasingly aware of flocks of restless birds. The flocks increase in number, and the birds grow more violent and daring. At first, Nat attributes this behavior to the unusual weather, but takes the threat more seriously than do his neighbors. Soon, however, the entire country is under siege, and it’s no longer safe to go outdoors. The tension mounts beautifully, as the narrator gradually comes to understand the enormity of the event: the birds are inescapable, and this isn’t a fight he can fight alone.

What I love most about this short story, as opposed to the film version, is how it activates my imagination. (The same could be said for every good book, I suppose.) Visualizing the growing threat, the brutal attacks, and the despair of the survivors leaves me breathless and full of adrenaline.

Bird Box

“It’s better to face madness with a plan than to sit still and let it take you in pieces.”

Promo photo for Bird Box, from Harper Collins Canada.

For a more modern look at the toll horror takes on a human mind, we turn to Bird Box, Josh Malerman‘s debut novel. No one can say what the creatures in this story look like, because anyone who glimpses them is driven to immediate, deadly violence, culminating in suicide. The victims lose their minds, as well as their humanity, before losing their own lives. A mother and her young children have survived by covering the windows in their isolated house, and learning to navigate blindfolded when they go outside. Now, they are driven to leave their home behind, and they set out on a blindfolded quest to find other survivors. Who can they trust? And what is following them?

Be warned: this intense novel doesn’t shy away from the disturbing, graphic descriptions of the victims’ deaths.

IT

“Want a balloon?”

Tim Curry as Pennywise in ABC’s 1990 miniseries, IT. Owned by Warner Bros.; photographer unknown.

When you think “scary clown,” you probably picture Pennywise, the creature Tim Curry played in the 1990 TV adaptation of Stephen King‘s novel, It. The thought of a creepy guy in white makeup who wants to eat children is sufficiently scary for most people, but IT is more than that: the clown is only one of the forms IT takes.

Ancient, malevolent, and powerful, IT comes from an unknown dimension. It lies slumbering until atrocious acts of human violence awaken it (unfortunately, this happens fairly regularly). When it comes to earth to feed, IT can take the shape of anything it chooses, in order to lure its victims. Sometimes IT appears as a victim’s loved one; other times, IT appears as a victim’s worst fear. But, as with Cthulhu, if a person were to see IT’s true form, the absolute horror would so baffle his mind, that he would go insane.

In 2015, British costume company MorphCostumes voted Pennywise the scariest creature in literature. The clown trumped Dracula, The Lord of the Rings’ Nazgûl, and Harry Potter’s Dementors, among other classic horror standards, based on “appearance, powers, and evil intent.”

 

Did your favorite creature make my list? Leave a comment below! And if you’re looking for history on some of the most famous undead creatures, check out this blog post from last year, “How Monsters Are Born,” by reference librarian Sharon Reily.

Read the rest of this entry

Here There Be Monsters . . . Kinda

By Stacy Parish, Children’s Department

“Eight more days ‘til Halloween, Halloween . . .”  OK, maybe not the most appropriate way to lead into a blog about scary-but-not-too-scary creatures who live in children’s books, by invoking a jingle used in the classic horror film “Halloween,” starring the fabulous future kid-lit author Jamie Lee Curtis, but with that tie-in, how could I not?

The Wild Things

First in our no-particular-order list of creepy creatures: the Wild Things inhabiting the island where Max sailed his private boat in and out of weeks and almost over a year in Maurice Sendak’s fabulous classic Where The Wild Things Are.  Being the King of all Wild Things was a blast for a while, what with having no homework, no bedtime, and no rules, but Max became terribly lonely “and wanted to be where someone loved him best of all.”  So he abdicated his throne and sailed back into the night of his very own room, to find his still-hot supper waiting for him.  The lesson here, in my opinion?  Those who truly love you will forgive your occasional monstrous behavior, and maybe even make you a grilled cheese sandwich.

The Grinch

“You’re a monster, Mr. Grinch/Your heart’s an empty hole/Your brain is full of spiders/You have garlic in your soul.”  Hence, the next monster in our Monster Mash-Up, that grouchy green grump who lives on Mount Crumpit.  Yes, friends and fiends, the antagonist-turned-protagonist of Dr. Seuss’ How The Grinch Stole Christmas is next in the roster of scary-not-scary monsters.  Let us ponder for a moment the classic literary juxtaposition of Good vs. Evil.  After a busy night of  animal abuse, cosplay, and totally highjacking all the boxes and bags and the last can of Who-Hash from Whoville, yet waking up to the sound of Cindy Lou Who and all her friends and relatives singing and celebrating anyway, the Grinch has an epiphany.  “What if Christmas, he thought, doesn’t come from a store.  What if Christmas, perhaps, means a little bit more.”  The Grinch’s heart “grew three sizes   that day,” making him not so monstrous after all.

Dementors

I implied at the beginning of this article that the monsters listed here wouldn’t be too ghastly.  Darling Reader, I lied.  You should now take the opportunity to fortify yourself with some chocolate before proceeding onward, because the Dementors from JK Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (and subsequent books in the series) are making their sinister presence known in our melange of monsters.  According to Professor Remus Lupin, “Dementors are among the foulest creatures that walk this earth. They infest the darkest, filthiest places, they glory in decay and despair, they drain peace, hope and happiness out of the air around them. Even Muggles feel their presence, though they can’t see them. Get too near a Dementor and every good feeling, every happy memory, will be sucked out of you. If it can, the Dementor will feed on you long enough to reduce you to something like itself – soulless and evil. You’ll be left with nothing but the worst experiences of your life.”  According to the website Pottermore.com (and if you don’t know about this marvelous site, you must visit as soon as you finish reading this delightful and not frightful blog), Dementors are the true scary beasties of the mystical realm.  Oh, it is also imperative to note that Dementors cannot be destroyed, but only driven away temporarily by using the Patronus Charm.

The Gruffalo

Yikes. Okay.  Let’s flee the darkness of the Dementors and continue onward in our odyssey of oddities.  Do you know the gruffalo?  No? Oh!  The Gruffalo is a children’s book written by Julia Donaldson that was inspired by a Chinese folk tale in which a fox borrows the terror of a tiger.  In Donaldson’s story, a mouse is taking a walk in the woods and encounters several creatures—a fox, an owl, and a snake– who would like to make a meal out of him.  The clever mouse declines the “invitations” to their homes by telling them that he already has lunch plans with his friend the gruffalo, who is a monster-like hybrid of half grizzly bear and half buffalo, whose favorite snack happens to be whichever animal that the mouse is trying to evade.  Terrified by the description of the fictional beast, each animal flees. Mousie is so proud of himself, and taunts them:  “Silly old fox/owl/snake, doesn’t he know?  There’s no such thing as a gruffalo!”  But here comes the plot twist! The mouse is shocked to encounter a real gruffalo, who threatens to eat him.  Again, Mousie’s cunning saves the day.  The mouse tells the gruffalo that he is the scariest monster in the forest, and proves it by leading the gruffalo past each creature that menaced him earlier, causing them to run away again when they see them walking together.  The gruffalo is increasingly impressed by this, and is apparently clueless that *he* is the scary one, so the sly mouse further presses it to his advantage by threatening to eat the gruffalo, who then hightails it into the forest.  Personally, I find this to be an excellent instructional tale for those among us who are physically diminutive (I’m 5’2”, Darling Reader) but make up for it in confidence.

So there you have it, Darling Reader, some charming-and not-alarming (well, with the exception of those foul Dementors) monsters who inhabit the pages of children’s books, and now your own imagination.  Have a frighteningly good Fall, and don’t be afraid to keep exploring the vast forest of literature that is available to you at WCPL.  Happy reading–

 


***The opinions and viewpoints expressed here are, as always, solely a product of the sometimes-disturbing contents of the author’s head and are in no way representative of the employees of WCPL, their families, or their Halloween-costumed housepets.   The author also wishes it to be known that while the nickname “Scary Stacy” was bestowed upon her by some sorority sisters in college, she really is trying to mellow into a kinder, gentler sort of modern monster.

Patriot Day

By Katy Searcy, Children’s Department

Most of us vividly remember the morning of September 11, 2001. We remember exactly where we were and what we were doing. But today, many children were either born after that date or were too young to remember the attacks. For those kids, here are eleven children’s books about September 11, 2001.

It’s Still a Dog’s New York by Susan L. Roth (J E ROT)
Pepper and Rover, two New York dogs, are miserable after the tragedy of September 11, 2001. Pepper feels overwhelmed with sadness and fear and anger. But in a tour of New York City, his friend Rover shows him that even though they’re sad, they can go on.

September Roses by Jeanette Winter (J E WIN)
On September 11, 2001, two sisters from South Africa are flying to New York City with 2,400 roses to be displayed at a flower show. When they land, they learn of the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center. The sisters cannot go home, and they are stranded with boxes and boxes of roses at the airport. When a kind stranger offers them a place to stay, they decide to repay this kindness by arranging their roses in the shape of the fallen towers.

Towers Falling by Jewell Parker Rhodes (J F RHODES)
As the anniversary of 9/11 approaches, Deja’s fifth grade teacher at her new school begins a unit on the tragedy, but Deja doesn’t completely understand why. Not when she has more important things to worry about, like the fact that her family is living in a homeless shelter or why her father is so sad all the time. As she begins making friends at school for the first time in her life, Deja realizes just how much the Twin Towers affect her.

I Survived the Attacks of September 11, 2001 by Lauren Tarshis (J F TARSHIS)
When Lucas’s parents decide football is too dangerous and make him quit, Lucas has to talk to his biggest fan: his Uncle Benny, who is a New York City firefighter. So the next morning, Lucas takes the train to the city instead of the bus to school. It’s a bright, beautiful day in New York. But just as Lucas arrives at his uncle’s firehouse, everything changes—and nothing will ever be the same again.

Cyber Spies and Secret Agents of Modern Times by Allison Lassieur (J 327.12 LAS)
The terrorist attack on September 11, 2001, spurred the United States and other countries around the world to develop new spying techniques, new cutting-edge equipment, and new recruits to meet the challenge of 21st century enemies and threats. Learn about the exciting modern world of spies and secret agents.

14 Cows for America by Carmen Agra Deedy (J 327.676073 DEE)
Nine months after the September 11 attacks, an American diplomat is surrounded by hundreds of Maasai people in western Kenya. A gift is about to be bestowed upon the American people, and he is here to accept it. Word of the gift will travel newswires around the globe. Many will be profoundly touched, but for Americans, this selfless gesture will have deeper meaning still. For a heartsick nation, the gift of fourteen cows emerges from the choking dust and darkness as a soft light of hope and friendship.

What Were the Twin Towers? by Jim O’Conner (J 725.23097471 O’CO)
When the Twin Towers were built in 1973, they were billed as an architectural wonder. At 1,368 feet, they clocked in as the tallest buildings in the world and changed the New York City skyline dramatically. Offices and corporations moved into the towers—also known as the World Trade Center—and the buildings were seen as the economic hub of the world. But on September 11, 2001, a terrorist attack toppled the towers and changed our nation forever. Discover the whole story of the Twin Towers—from their ambitious construction to their tragic end.

The Man Who Walked Between the Towers by Mordicai Gerstein (J 791.34 GER)
In 1974, French aerialist Philippe Petit threw a tightrope between the two towers of the World Trade Center and spent an hour walking, dancing, and performing high-wire tricks a quarter mile in the sky. This picture book captures the detail, daring, and drama of Petit’s feat.

September 11 Then and Now by Peter Benoit (J 973.931 BEN)
This nonfiction book in the True Book series for young readers recounts the events before, during, and after the terrorist attack on the United States on September 11, 2001.

America Is Under Attack: The Day the Towers Fell: September 11, 2001 by Don Brown (J 973.931 BRO)
Straightforward and honest, this account of September 11, 2001, moves chronologically through the morning, from the terrorist plane hijackings to the crashes at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and Pennsylvania; from the rescue operations at the World Trade Center site in New York City to the collapse of the buildings.

Fireboat: The Heroic Adventures of the John J. Harvey by Maira Kalman (J 974.7 KAL)
A fireboat, launched in 1931, is retired after many years of fighting fires along the Hudson River but is saved from being scrapped and then called into service again on September 11, 2001.

National Humor Month: Weird Library and Literary Facts

By Lon Maxwell, Reference Department

Once again the time has come for us to make you smile through the medium of the blogosphere. Last year we regaled you of the rather painstakingly concocted tale of St. Hilarius, to some fanfare. This year however, a different tack is needed. This year I am going to give you some of the most outrageous books and library facts imaginable. All will be true and factual. That’s what I deal in, you know facts. So hold on to your mouse for some of the great absurdities of literature and libraries.

Portrait of Giacomo Casanova (1725-1798) by Anton Raphael Mengs

  1. Libraries have more cardholders than Visa.
  2. Libraries have more locations than McDonalds.
  3. Casanova, one of the greatest lovers in history, was a librarian.
  4. Ranganathan, an Indian Librarian and Mathematician, created five laws of library science (not to be confused with the three laws of robotics created by Isaac Asimov): 1) Books are for use. 2) Every reader his book. 3) Every book its reader. 4) Save the time of the user. 5) The library is a growing organism.
  5. King Æthelred, often known as the Unready, was also known as the librarian king, or Writðengel, because of his large collection of hand copied manuscripts.
  6. Before becoming a leader in the Chinese communist movement, Mao Tse Tung was a librarian at Beijing University.
  7. 331.892829225209712743090511 is the longest Dewey decimal number on record. It deals with labor relations in tractor manufacturing in Canada in 2001.
  8. The book How the World Began, written in 1962, is the work of the youngest published author ever, Dorothy Straight, who penned the book for her grandmother at age four.
  9. The first prose novel, The Tale of the Genji, was written by Lady Murasaki Shikibu 1000 years ago (approximately 1008 CE).
  10. William Shakespeare is credited with inventing more words than any other single person. Among his creations are: hurry, boredom, disgraceful, hostile, money’s worth, obscene, puke, perplex, on purpose, shooting star, and sneak.
  11. While in Tangiers, William S. Burroughs was known to put his cat, Ginger, into a child’s suit and insist he be served in cafes.
  12. The longest sentence in the book Les Miserables is 823 words long, and it still falls short of the current record holder. Dancing Lessons for the Advanced in Age(1964) by Bohumil Hrabal is a novel made up of a single sentence that goes on for 128 pages.
  13. In early drafts of Gone with the Wind, Scarlet O’Hara was named Pansy.
  14. Generations have grown up with the Arab street urchin Aladdin, but the original story from Tales of 1001 Arabian Nights begins, “Aladdin was a little Chinese boy.”
  15. The Land of Oz is named after a filing cabinet. L. Frank Baum had two; one was A-N the other O-Z.
  16. Dr. Seuss wrote Green Eggs and Ham using less than 50 different words on a dare from his editor. John Milton used more than 8,000 different words to write Paradise Lost.
  17. Orson Wells radio broadcast of The War of the Worlds, of October 30, 1938, was so realistic that people actually believed there was an alien invasion occurring just outside the New York metropolitan area. Police attempted to break in the broadcast studio to end the show because of the number of distraught calls they were receiving.
  18. Lisbeth Slander, from The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, is based on Stieg Larsson’s idea of what Pippi Longstocking would be like as a grown up.
  19. A note from The Strand Magazine – September 1903

    Sherlock Holmes may have had the first real fandom. When Arthur Conan Doyle killed off the famous detective he had begun to tire of in His Last Bow, over 20,000 people canceled their subscription to The Strand Magazine. In his autobiography, Doyle writes, “They say that a man is never properly appreciated until he is dead, and the general protest against my summary execution of Holmes taught me how many and numerous were his friends. ‘You Brute!’ was the beginning of a letter which one lady sent me….”

  20. The first book bought on Amazon was called Fluid Concepts and Creative Analogies: Computer Models of the Fundamental Mechanisms of Thought.
  21. Bibliosmia is the enjoyment of the smell of old books.
  22. Agatha Christie disliked her creation Hercule Poirot, calling him “a detestable, bombastic, tiresome, egocentric little creep.”
  23. Evelyn Waugh’s first wife’s name was Evelyn. They were known as ‘He-Evelyn’ and ‘She-Evelyn’.
  24. Edgar Allen Poe, famous for his horror stories, actually invented the mystery genre and was one of the first to propose a solution to the cosmological problem known as Olbers’ Paradox.
  25. Stephen King was once arrested for vandalism when he went into a bookstore in Virginia and began signing copies of his book.
  26. Poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge joined the army under the name Silas Tomkyn Cumberbatch.
  27. Noted diarist, Samuel Pepys, made the first recorded instance of an English person drinking tea on 25 September 1660.
  28. Mickey Spillane insisted that 50,000 copies of his book Kiss Me, Deadly be destroyed for a single typo. The comma was left off the title.
  29. Duran Duran: The First Four Years of the Fab Five(1984) was Neil Gaiman’s first published book.
  30. Owing to failing eyesight, James Joyce wrote much of his novel, Finnegan’s Wake, in crayon on pieces of cardboard.
  31. Portrait of Roald Dahl taken 20 April 1954 by Photographer Carl Van Vechten

    Roald Dahl was a taste tester for Cadbury’s Chocolate in his youth.

  32. Ian Fleming based many of the traits of James Bond on his friend and amiable rival, Roald Dahl. The two met while working for British Intelligence.
  33. J. R. R. Tolkien was once known to have dressed up as an axe-wielding Anglo-Saxon warrior and chased his neighbor as a jest.
  34. The Count of Monte Cristo has such a vivid and realistic description of Dantes’s incarceration due to the fact that Dumas drew upon his recollection of his own time in prison for breaking the appellation d’origine controlee laws (essentially selling counterfeit cheese).
  35. The Hogwarts houses names were originally written down on an air sickness bag because J. K. Rowling came up with them while on a plane.
  36. In 1871, Mark Twain held patents for a scrapbooking technique and for an elastic hook and eye strap for garments similar to those used on modern bras.
  37. Ernest Vincent Wright wrote his 50,000 word novel, Gadsby, without using the letter “e”. Georges Perec did the same thing in French with his novel, La Disparition, but it has the added quality of being translated into English, German, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Russian, Turkish, Dutch, Romanian, Croatian and Japanese all without using the most common letter in their respective language.
  38. M6 Toll Junction T1 in the UK, those poor books

    In building the M6 Toll Road in the UK, some 2.5 million Mills & Boon (equivalent to the American Harlequin romances) novels were pulped and mixed into the tarmac to help the surface absorbency.

  39. While visiting a Harry Potter chat room J. K. Rowling was told to be quiet because she didn’t know enough about Harry Potter.
  40. The Alice who inspired Alice in Wonderland is not the same one who inspired Through the Looking Glass.

So that is the list of the craziest facts about books, authors and libraries I could find. (Okay, I also spend a fair amount of time writing fiction as well so I may have made up a few of these to add a little spice to the mix. Sorry, I can’t let the first of April go by without some fun). Were you able to figure out the crazy but true from the too good to be true? Here are the purposeful missteps:

  • King Æthelred was not known as the librarian king. His successor, Alfred the Great, was the first English king to author books.
  • Ian Fleming and Roald Dahl did have a friendly, gentleman’s rivalry during their time in the O.S.S. and Dahl was a war hero and lady’s man, but when asked about his inspiration, Fleming did not list his old chum Dahl.
  • Alexandre Dumas never served a day in jail for any crime, and chees was not added to the AoC laws until 1925.
  • Stephen King was once mistaken for a vandal in a bookstore in Alice Springs, Australia when he went in and began signing copies of his books, but the owner realized who he was long before the authorities were called.
  • Burroughs did have a cat named Ginger and got up to some amazing antics in Morocco, but putting Ginger in a suit was not one of them (that we know of).
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