2018 New Year Reading Challenge

By Lon Maxwell, Reference Department

Last year they asked me to make up a list for the New Year Reading Challenge. Apparently I did a good enough job that they’ve asked me to do it again. Last year I talked about all the benefits of reading. How it can help with empathy, stress, high blood pressure, and even reduce risk of Alzheimer’s disease. These are all great and laudable reasons to read, but the main thing that I’d like to work on this year is fostering a love to read. According to a Gallup poll, between 1978 and 2014 the percentage of people in the United States that hadn’t picked up a book in a year or more close to tripled from 8% to 23% [i](and they even counted the audiobook listeners as readers). That it has tripled is bad enough, that it is nearing a full quarter of the population is startling.

The average number of books read per capita was 12 in 2015, but the voracious readers inflated that number a bit and the most common given response to a survey of readers when asked for the number of books they’d read in the last year was four[ii].  Four?… Four! How in the world am I supposed to make a book challenge list to attract the average person when they only read a book a season?

I realized that this blog is usually read by readers. We word hungry book people that push the average up to twelve books a year. This year I thought I’d make it both a little easier and a little harder. There are two less books this year, but the suggestions are more specific. If you can read two books a month, regardless of the themes below, great! But if you like to push yourself, try to keep up with the challenge and if you need help finding a book ask your local librarians for help. We’ve always got suggestions.

January

  1. It’s a new year, read something new. Pick a book that was published in the last 2 months.
  2. Renew your spirit for the New Year, read something that inspires you.

February

  1. It’s African American History Month. Read a book by an African American author.
  2. Read a book with a romantic theme or subplot, It doesn’t have to be a romance novel, just a little love will do.

March

  1. Award Season is wrapping up. Read a book that has won an award. [1]
  2. For Women’s History Month, read a book by a female author or with a female main character.

April

  1. Read a collection of poetry for national poetry month.
  2. Spring has arrived, read an article in a periodical about nature

May

  1. Free Comic Book Day is May 6th. Read a graphic novel, comic book or manga.
  2. Teacher Appreciation week is in May. Read a book that is required reading for school. [2]

June

  1. Get a book recommendation from a dad.
  2. Read a book about the outdoors, whether it’s a story, travel guide or field guide.

July

  1. July 4th celebrates independence, be free to read a book of your choice.
  2. Find a beach read, something fun and enjoyable, regardless of whether you are going to the beach.

August

  1. It’s hot in the south in august. Read something form a southern writer.
  2. Go back to school by reading a book you loved or were supposed to read in high school or college.

September

  1. Harvest time brings to mind great food, find a book about food or cooking that you might enjoy.
  2. Read a book that has been banned in September to celebrate Banned Books Week 9/29-10/6/18

October

  1. Read a book about something that scares you. It doesn’t have to be H.P. Lovecraft, just that you challenge your fears.
  2. Halloween means treats and sweets. Try a little brain candy. Read a book just for its entertainment value.

November

  1. Election season is close at hand. Read about the issues and the candidates.
  2. Find a book about someone, somewhere or something less fortunate to help you be thankful for what you have.

December

  1. Find a book that takes place in winter to match the weather outside.
  2. Add Jolabokaflod to your holiday calendar. Give books as gifts on December 24th and spend some time reading one.[iii]

Advertisements

About WCPLtn

The Williamson County Public Library System seeks to meet the recreational, educational, and information needs of county patrons through: a significant collection of digital and print materials housed at a network of countywide locations headquartered in Franklin; extensive personal computer and related technology; and diverse and interesting programs targeted to various age groups.

Posted on January 5, 2018, in Hot Topics and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: