Ian Fleming: A Life Leading to 007

Ian Fleming’s commissioned drawing of James Bond

Ian Fleming’s commissioned drawing of James Bond

By Lindsay Roseberry, Reference Department

“When I wrote the first one in 1953, I wanted Bond to be an extremely dull, uninteresting man to who things happened. I wanted him to be a blunt instrument…when I was casting around for a name for my protagonist I thought by God (James Bond) is the dullest name I ever heard.”
—-Ian Fleming, The New Yorker, 21 April 1962

Ian Fleming, James Bond’s creator, was born on May 28, 1908 in London. His father was Member of Parliament representing Dundee Scotland, and was killed in WW I. The not yet world-famous Winston Churchill wrote his father’s obituary (that’s what I call connections). Fleming attended several schools, but never really excelled academically in any of them, but he always did well in athletics. He went to Eton College, and when that didn’t work out, he attended Sandhurst Military College, but he wasn’t interested in a military career either.

picmonkey-collageHis frustrated mother decided to send him to a small school in the Tyrolian Mountains, where he improved his foreign language skills and also learned mountain climbing and skiing. He loved his schooling there. From Austria he went to Munich University to finish his education and take his Foreign Officer entrance exams. When he did not pass these exams, he became a journalist with Reuters. He enjoyed his time with Reuters honing his writing craft, and in 1933 he was sent to Moscow to cover a trial. Eventually he bowed to family pressure and became a banker and stock broker. He really didn’t enjoy that. Thankfully for him, and everyone who loves James Bond, his time in Russia paid off. He was asked by the Foreign Office to return to Moscow and write about a trade mission, but he was really sent there to spy.

He must have done well since his name was recommended for a new position, assistant to the director of naval intelligence. He became a lieutenant in the Special Branch of the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve and had some success with his ideas being implemented during World War II. After the war, he took a job with Kemsley News, which owned many newspapers in England. He was the foreign manager running the foreign correspondents but he was able to fulfill  dream by taking two months off every year and live in Jamaica. Several years earlier, he had told friends he was going to move to Jamaica and write the best spy novel ever. And so he did. And continued to do so every year until his death

In April 1953, the first James Bond novel by Ian Fleming was published. He believed that Casino Royale would not be popular, but it was an instant success! Even the London Times gave it a rave review. James Bond was a character based on some of the commandos Fleming knew during his service with the Naval Intelligence division. The name James Bond was chosen because it was short, strong and found on the cover of one of Fleming’s bird books. James Bond was also the name of an American ornithologist, who had several books, one about the birds of the West Indies.

In 1964, after years of failing health, he died from a heart attack. As his legacy, he had written these twelve James Bond novels

  1. Casino Royale
  2. Live and Let Die
  3. Moonraker
  4. Diamonds are Forever
  5. From Russia with Love
  6. Dr. No
  7. Goldfinger
  8. For your Eyes Only
  9. Thunderball
  10. The Spy who loved me
  11. On her majesty’s secret service
  12. You only live twice

These last two were published posthumously

  1. The Man with the golden gun
  2. Octopussy and The Living Daylights (2 short stories)

Since Fleming’s death, several authors have been authorized to continue the James Bond series. John Gardner wrote fourteen novels. Raymond Benson wrote six novels, some novelizations and short stories. Each of these authors wrote one book: Kingsley Amis, Sebastian Faulks, Jeffrey Deaver, William Boyd and Anthony Horowitz.


Interesting things about James Bond from Film School Rejects’ study of the men who played Bond, their movies, and their highs and lows

  • Bond’s number—007—was assigned by Fleming in reference to one of British naval intelligence’s key achievements of World War I—the breaking of the German diplomatic code. One of the German documents cracked and read by the British was the Zimmermann Telegram, which was coded 0075, and was one of the factors that led to the US entering the war.
  • Even though he is considered the best James Bond by many, Connery was not the first choice. Fleming wanted David Niven to play bond, and a list of other actors were also considered.
  • Lazenby was the youngest actor to play James Bond, stepping into the role at the age of 30. Moore took the role of Bond at 45; he was the oldest actor to start playing Bond.
  • Moonraker was the studio’s answer to Star Wars, sending Bond into space to fight a master race with lasers.
  • Tomorrow Never Dies was the first movie to have its entire production budget covered by product placement consideration fees.
  • Timothy Dalton was offered the role of James Bond twice: once for On Her Majesty’s Secret Service and again in the middle of Roger Moore’s tenure. He did not become Bond until 1987. He thought he was too young when first offered the role.
  • Pierce Brosnan was also considered for the role twice. When Roger Moore left the franchise, Cubby Broccoli tapped Brosnan as the next James Bond. But Brosnan had just started Remington Steele, and was not released from his contract.
  • The franchise decided to reboot the entire Bond series after Brosnan’s last film and Daniel Craig won the role. Although not the youngest actor to play James Bond, he is the only actor to have been born after the release of Dr. No.
  • James Bond has a Facebook page @James Bond 007

Interestign webpages about James Bond:

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About WCPLtn

The Williamson County Public Library System seeks to meet the recreational, educational, and information needs of county patrons through: a significant collection of digital and print materials housed at a network of countywide locations headquartered in Franklin; extensive personal computer and related technology; and diverse and interesting programs targeted to various age groups.

Posted on November 11, 2016, in Authors and Books and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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