Daily Archives: May 27, 2016

More than just a Mystery

By Lindsay Roseberry, Reference Department

Love a good mystery? Looking for a new author to read?  Since May is Mystery Month, you’re in luck!

First off, I need to tell you about a great database we subscribe to: Books & Authors. B&A offers new ways to explore books, authors, genres and topics. This database makes exploration of genre fiction and essential non-fiction fun! You can also look through lists created by libraries under Expert Picks & Librarian Lists to find new mystery genres to read. One of the best Books+and+Authorsfeatures is looking up a book you just enjoyed and finding a list of similar books and finding new authors to read. And you can access this list at home, before you come to the library, or go on READS.

There are another two great websites to consider when looking for new authors. You might already know about Good Reads for looking up reviews.  But did you know they have genre lists?  You can browse through page after page of books, read the blurbs and make your lists.  The second site we use often is Fantastic Fiction.  This is a great website that gives you series information either with an author search or a title search about British and American authors.

If you’re looking for new mystery books, try Stop, You’re Killing Me. It’s a great website for mystery lovers.  You can look for new mysteries by job (archaeologist, pathologist, farmer, antique dealer), by location or country, by historical time periods, by awards and by read-alikes.  It’s almost a one-stop shopping/reading center!Mystery

Most people choose what mysteries to read based on the New York Times Book List or word of mouth. But there are many genres of mysteries and many places to find more titles to read. There are police procedurals, thrillers, legal thrillers, historical mysteries, gothic mysteries, paranormal mysteries, cozy mysteries, mysteries set in foreign countries and in futuristic settings.

Cozy mysteries can be addictive. These are usually a series about amateur sleuths and you don’t want to miss one.  Some of the popular authors are Agatha Christie, Susan Wittig Albert, Julia Spencer-Fleming, and many more.

Gothic mysteries are usually set in a dark, spooky mansion or castle, with suspicious sounds and people. Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen and Wuthering Heights may have been some of the first Gothic novels, but they certainly weren’t the last.  Mary Stewart, Phillis A Whitney, Victoria Holt, Barbara Michaels and V. C. Andrews are preeminent in this genre.  Diane Setterfield, M. J. Rose, John Harwood, Kristen Callahan are more contemporary authors of this genre.

If you get tired of mysteries in a current setting, try a historical mystery. There are so many series set in the middle ages.  One of the best featured Father Cadfael, soldier and man of the world who became a monk.  Most of the mysteries take place in the monastery or on the grounds.  Another good series features Marcus Didius Falco, and is set in ancient Rome.  One of the most popular was written by Arian Franklin, who unfortunately passed away several years ago.  Her detective was a woman physician who lived under Henry II of England’s rule.

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John Grisham made the legal thriller a genre. Everyone was pleased when he wrote a sequel to A Time to Kill. Other authors in this genre are Scott Turow and John Ellsworth and John Lescroart.  And we can’t leave out Earl Stanley Gardner, who started it all with Perry Mason.  He is credited with influencing many people to become lawyers.

International mysteries, which are set in foreign countries, are fun to read. You learn about other countries, how the police and justice system work and they are absorbing.  Just about every country in the world has had at last one mystery set in it.  The Scandinavian countries are very popular locations now, what with The Girl Who and Wallander series.  Jo Nesbo is very popular, and Icelandic and Finnish stories are in the running as well.  One of the continued favorites read is Donna Leon, which features Commissario Brunetti in Venice. And Louise Penny must be mentioned here again since her series takes place in the Toronto area.

One good example of a paranormal mystery series is the character of Aunt Dimity, a ghost who assists in solving mysteries. Barbara Hambly has a series with a physician in Victorian England seeking the assistance of a vampire.  Laurell K. Hamilton’s Anita Blake would fit here, too; she’s a vampire slayer.  Patricia Briggs has quite a following with her series featuring Mercy Thompson; Simon R. Green has his Tales of the Nightside. Charles Stross, Dan Simmons and Nora Roberts write mysteries with a more science fiction edge.

GreenSR-Nightside-UK2-BlogPolice procedurals are mysteries are solved by police as they go about their daily duties, working with clues, putting them together, solving the crime and catching the bad guys. The detective novel is similar, but the crime solver has a few more liberties, and we learn more about their lives and sometimes loves and if you have an amateur detective, those are often considered cozy mysteries.  .  Louise Penny was won many awards for her police procedurals.  They are also excellent to listen to.  Other authors to consider are Carol O’Connor, Ed McBain, Michael Connelly, and Bill Pronzini.

Psychological suspense thrillers are the ones you can’t put down and keep you up at night. Remember Gone Girl?  That was Gillian Flynn, who is a master of this genre.  There are other authors too; S J Watson, Paula Hawkins (The Girl on the Train), Iris Johansen, Lisa Gardner, Jonathan Kellerman, Patricia Highsmith, Henry James, Dennis Lehane, Tana French, Mary Kubica and many, many more.


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