Daily Archives: January 9, 2015

NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION HELP

By Robin Ebelt, Reference Department640px-PostcardNewYearsResolutionSoapBubbles1909

Each January, about 33% of Americans resolve to improve themselves in some way. Sadly, less than half of the people stick to their resolutions six months later. How are you doing keeping your goals? Do you need some help sticking to your New Year’s Resolutions? The Williamson County Public Library is here to help! Our elibrary digital databases may have just what you need!

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RESOLUTION: IMPROVE YOUR FINANCIAL SITUATION

Learn to invest using Valueline.

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RESOLUTION: LOSE WEIGHT/FEEL BETTER

Find up to date information at our Health and Wellness Resource Center.

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RESOLUTION: READ MORE

Joining a book club may motivate you to read and help you fit socializing into your schedule.

Check out the book clubs offered at the library.

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RESOLUTION: TRAVEL MORE

Learn about your U.S. travel destinations with AtoZtheUSA!

Learn a new language with Powerspeak.
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RESOLUTION: LEARN MORE ABOUT THE COMPUTER

Take a computer class at the library or practice your computer skills online with the Learning Express Library

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RESOLUTION: START A NEW CAREER

Write a resume, find advice, try the interview simulations, and explore open jobs at Career Transisitons

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RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE

To locate volunteer programs across the county visit VolunteerMatch.org.

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NEED HELP STICKING TO IT?

Read 7 Psychology Tricks to Make Your Resolutions Stick by Time Magazine.

 


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How to Teach Your Baby to Read by Glenn and Janet Doman

babyBy Liz Arrambide, Children’s Librarian

Occasionally families ask us what books do we have to teach very young children how to read. Most of the books we carry are designed for older children. Megan Sheridan has written an excellent article on this blog explaining fun ways to teach basic early literacy skills.

For families that want to teach their young children (under age six) how to read there is an excellent book: “How to Teach Your Baby to Read: the gentle revolution” by Glenn Doman and Janet Doman. Glenn Doman and his research team started in the 1950’s to see what they could do to help children with brain injuries increase their capacity to learn. The researchers learned that their methods helped the children to learn to read. They were surprised to find that a brain damaged child could read at ages three and four when their peers could not.

The institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential began to theorize that very young children seem to be learning differently than children who are six years or older. A child learns language by being shown an object and then being told the name of the object. The team experimented and found that this type of learning can be extended to teaching a child to read. Very young children can learn that the sound ”ball”, a physical ball and the word “ball” all mean the same thing. Their in-depth research showed that this facility of the brain disappears at age six.

As a young mother, I was intrigued with this book. I tried their methods with my then two and half year old child. We had a lot of fun and she learned to read really well. When she started Kindergarten, she tested at a third grade reading level. I’ve tutored others in reading since then. It was much easier for my daughter to learn to read using this method. She didn’t have to be taught about “consonant blends” or the “er” sound etc. She didn’t go through these stages. For interested families, this revised edition offers a fun and easy way to teach very young children to read.

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