Monthly Archives: January 2015

Candlemas = Groundhog Day??

By Lindsay Roseberry, Reference Librarianground-36436_1280

We all know about Groundhog Day on February 2, when a fuzzy animal is brought forth to predict the weather. How could we miss that huge celebration at Punxsutawney, when Phil, the groundhog (the official term is woodchuck –remember the tongue twister?), is brought out of his den and the crowd goes wild. If he sees his shadow, then winter will end sooner than later, but if he doesn’t see his shadow, that means 6 more weeks of winter. Of course, this weather forecast has never been that accurate…

And of course, many people fondly remember watching the movie Groundhog Day, starring Bill Murray and Andie McDowell. It has become a “contemporary classic.”   In case you don’t remember, Phil (Bill Murray) gets stuck in a time loop on Groundhog Day, and only after he learns from his mistakes is he able to get back on track. In 2006, it was even added to the United States National Film Registry for being a culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant film.

So where does Candlemas fit in, you may ask?? This holy day is celebrated by Christians on February 2 to commemorate both the presentation of Jesus at the Temple and Jesus’ first entry into the Temple. Since Jesus is considered a “light-bringer,” the custom was to bless candles on this day as well, which is where we get the term Candlemas from. In pagan times, this day was also known as Imbolc (pronounced i-Molk), a festival marking the first day of Spring, which usually fell on February 2. Evidently spring came early in the Gaelic lands, and coincidentally (meaning it was probably a direct influence), this holy day was also used to predict the coming weather.

These poems, found in English and German, show how on Candlemas the weather could be forecast.

If Candle-mas Day is bright and clear,
There’ll be two winters in the year.

If Candle mas be fair and bright,
Winter has another flight.

If Candlemas brings clouds and rain,
Winter will not come again.

The German immigrants also brought with them the tradition of a hedgehog telling the spring forecast, but with no hedgehogs to be found, groundhogs were the closest animal they could find in the new world. And Pennsylvania has had many Germans settlers.

And now you know how Groundhog Day and Candlemas both have a place in American culture.

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7086949891_14db5ab9f5_bAn aside: The name Punxsutawney comes from the Lenape name for the location “ponksad-uteney” which means “the town of the sandflies.” The name woodchuck comes from the Indian legend of “Wojak, the groundhog” considered by them to be their underground ancestor.

 


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Carol O’Connell’s Mallory novels

By Lindsay Roseberry, Reference Librarian

OConnellC-KM-Group01UK_thumb[3]Have you read all three of The Girl Who books? Looking for a new Salander? Perhaps you should try the books by Carol O’Connell featuring Mallory. Kathy Mallory was an eleven year old foundling living on the streets when she was rescued by New York police detective Markowitz. As she grew up, she continued to lack many social skills, including empathy, conversation and humor. She is considered by some a sociopath. One review stated that Mallory is the original Salander. The novels are all full of twists and turns and interesting characters.

The books, in order are Mallory’s Oracle (1994), The Man Who Cast Two Shadows (1995), Killing Critics (1996), Stone Angel (1997), Shell Game (1999), Crime School (2002), The Jury Must Die (2003), Winter House (2004), Find Me (2006) and the most recent book The Chalk Girl (2011). Our library has the entire series.

kathy-mallory

Down The Rabbit-Hole: Lewis Carroll

lewisBy Stacy Parish, Children’s Library Assistant

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (January 27, 1832-January 14, 1898 — and yes, his birthday is this month) was better known by his nom de plume, Lewis Carroll. Although he is remembered primarily for his literary works, Dodgson was also a mathematician, logician, educator, Anglican deacon, inventor, and photographer.

Dodgson’s most famous writings are Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland (1865), its sequel Through The Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There (1871, and which includes the poems “Jabberwocky” and “The Walrus and the Carpenter”) and the poem The Hunting of the Snark, all of which are examples of the genre of literary nonsense. Dodgson’s creations were not limited to that genre, however. He also penned several epic poems (Phantasmagoria, also published as Rhyme?And Reason?), poetry collections (Three Sunsets and Other Poems), and numerous writings about mathematics and logic.6639da733b10ce68a756868bdd2d573d

Factual information on Dodgson’s life from 1858-1863 is scarce. His personal diaries from that time are sporadic; large portions of some of the volumes are missing, and some years are completely absent.   Hence, there are quite a few improbable and controversial stories about him that proliferated and became accepted even without any evidence to support them. It has been suggested by some of Dodgson’s biographers that he had an improper interest in young females; however, his personal diaries and letters reflect that he was keenly interested in adult women, and enjoyed numerous relationships with single and married women, some of which were deemed somewhat scandalous by the social dictates of the Victorian era. Dodgson’s nephew and biographer Stuart Dodgson Collingwood wrote that children appealed to Dodgson primarily because he was an educator at heart, and he saw in them the best slate to work upon. Collingwood also says that Dodgson had an uncanny gift for making even the dullest subjects interesting.

aliceDodgson’s life changed drastically in many ways after the overwhelming commercial success of Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland as the fame of his pen name “Lewis Carroll” spread rapidly throughout the world. He was bombarded with fan mail and often with unwanted attention. Dodgson also began earning significant sums of money from his writing, yet he remained at Oxford in various capacities until his death. The sequel to Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland was published in late 1871 (although the title page of the first edition erroneously lists 1872 as the publication date) and was entitled Through The Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There. The mood of this book is slightly darker, and perhaps is a reflection of the changes in Dodgson’s life since the publication of the first Alice book.

Whether your taste runs to Alice’s fanciful adventures down the rabbit-hole or through the looking-glass, or to Dodgson’s/Carroll’s beautiful and often biting poetic verse, certainly there are worse ways to spend a winter’s afternoon than curled up with a volume of one of his marvelous creations.

Three Parts Dead by Max Gladstone

91Aw6BgBpKLBy Lindsay Roseberry, Reference Librarian

In this imaginative steam-punk fantasy, the god Kos, protector of Alt Coulumb, has died and must be revived before the city falls apart. Kos the Everburning literally keeps the city going—holding up the city’s infrastructure, as well as answering the prayers of his church and clergy. Tara Abernathy, a new intern, and her boss, Mrs. Kevarian (from the investigative firm Kelethras, Albrecht and Ao) have come to Alt Coulumb to find out how Kos died and revive him. Tara and Mrs. Kevarian are magical investigators who solve problems. They have run into a big one. Kos was murdered—who would be able to murder a god? Any why?

One reviewer suggested that if the authors Roger Zelazny, Neil Gaiman and John Grisham had collaborated on a book, something like Three Parts Dead would be the result. I’d like to add Jim Butcher and possibly Terry Pratchett to this list as well.

Will Tara, with the help of the priest Abelard and Justice Cat(herine) and the despised gargoyles, find out what happened to Kos and bring him back? Will the city survive if they can’t? Why did someone wipe the vampire privateer’s mind? Is Justice truly blind? And most importantly, when will the sequel come out?! Remarkable that this is Gladstone’s first novel.

NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION HELP

By Robin Ebelt, Reference Department640px-PostcardNewYearsResolutionSoapBubbles1909

Each January, about 33% of Americans resolve to improve themselves in some way. Sadly, less than half of the people stick to their resolutions six months later. How are you doing keeping your goals? Do you need some help sticking to your New Year’s Resolutions? The Williamson County Public Library is here to help! Our elibrary digital databases may have just what you need!

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RESOLUTION: IMPROVE YOUR FINANCIAL SITUATION

Learn to invest using Valueline.

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RESOLUTION: LOSE WEIGHT/FEEL BETTER

Find up to date information at our Health and Wellness Resource Center.

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RESOLUTION: READ MORE

Joining a book club may motivate you to read and help you fit socializing into your schedule.

Check out the book clubs offered at the library.

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RESOLUTION: TRAVEL MORE

Learn about your U.S. travel destinations with AtoZtheUSA!

Learn a new language with Powerspeak.
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RESOLUTION: LEARN MORE ABOUT THE COMPUTER

Take a computer class at the library or practice your computer skills online with the Learning Express Library

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RESOLUTION: START A NEW CAREER

Write a resume, find advice, try the interview simulations, and explore open jobs at Career Transisitons

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RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE

To locate volunteer programs across the county visit VolunteerMatch.org.

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NEED HELP STICKING TO IT?

Read 7 Psychology Tricks to Make Your Resolutions Stick by Time Magazine.

 


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How to Teach Your Baby to Read by Glenn and Janet Doman

babyBy Liz Arrambide, Children’s Librarian

Occasionally families ask us what books do we have to teach very young children how to read. Most of the books we carry are designed for older children. Megan Sheridan has written an excellent article on this blog explaining fun ways to teach basic early literacy skills.

For families that want to teach their young children (under age six) how to read there is an excellent book: “How to Teach Your Baby to Read: the gentle revolution” by Glenn Doman and Janet Doman. Glenn Doman and his research team started in the 1950’s to see what they could do to help children with brain injuries increase their capacity to learn. The researchers learned that their methods helped the children to learn to read. They were surprised to find that a brain damaged child could read at ages three and four when their peers could not.

The institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential began to theorize that very young children seem to be learning differently than children who are six years or older. A child learns language by being shown an object and then being told the name of the object. The team experimented and found that this type of learning can be extended to teaching a child to read. Very young children can learn that the sound ”ball”, a physical ball and the word “ball” all mean the same thing. Their in-depth research showed that this facility of the brain disappears at age six.

As a young mother, I was intrigued with this book. I tried their methods with my then two and half year old child. We had a lot of fun and she learned to read really well. When she started Kindergarten, she tested at a third grade reading level. I’ve tutored others in reading since then. It was much easier for my daughter to learn to read using this method. She didn’t have to be taught about “consonant blends” or the “er” sound etc. She didn’t go through these stages. For interested families, this revised edition offers a fun and easy way to teach very young children to read.

Eragon Series by Christopher Paolini

InheritanceCycleCoversBy Lindsay Roseberry, Reference Librarian

Christopher Paolini had an idea for a book in high school. Lucky for us all he started writing a fantasy novel featuring a young boy named Eragon who finds one of the world’s last dragons. Eragon and the dragon Saphira learn how to work together throughout the series, which enables them to fight the evil king Galbatorix. He has several setbacks, saves his village and his brother who becomes a warrior in his own right. Those of us who finished all four books (originally there were supposed to be only three) were happy to find out that Paolini will revisit Alagaesia again. If you are looking for something to read after Hunger Games, Twilight and Harry Potter, I suggest you revisit The Inheritance Cycle featuring Eragon and Saphira. The first volume is titled Eragon. Volumes two Eldest and three Brisingr followed not quickly enough for most of us waiting impatiently. The final volume Inheritance came out last fall.

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