Williamson County Public Library Blog

Read to Your Child: Doctor’s Orders!

Advertisements

By Megan Sheridan, Children’s Librarian

Has your child’s doctor told you to read to your little one?  If not, maybe you’ve heard about this; the American Academy of Pediatrics has advised pediatricians to urge parents and caregivers to read to their children (read the article).  Why are some doctors doing this?  It’s because reading to children, especially ages 0 to 5, plays a crucial role in preparing them for success in school and in life. Reading to very young children is not about teaching them to read but getting them ready to read.  The American Library Association (ALA) has built a program around this concept called Every Child Ready to Read (ECRR). As more and more data about the importance of Early Childhood Literacy has been published and analyzed, groups like The American Academy of Pediatrics and others are urging caregivers to read to their children.

You might be overwhelmed or even intimidated when an article, book or doctor tells you to read to your child.  You might wonder “what books should I read to my little one(s)?” and “How do I prepare my child for Kindergarten?”

Created by Rebecca Tischler

If you’ve asked yourself these questions; don’t worry! You’re probably already doing many things to get your child ready to read and if you’re not, it’s easy to start and never too late.

There are five activities to develop your child’s early literacy skills: Talk, Read, Sing, Write and Play. For a quick explanation of these activities and examples of how to do them visit this website from the Hennepin County Library in Minnesota. The five activities can be done in your daily routine. For example, simply talk to your child about the world around you and the activities you do every day. Talk about how pretty the white clouds are in the sky and how the cozy the blanket is. Don’t feel silly talking to your newborn when you’re changing her diaper or getting her bottle ready. The more your child hears you talk the more words she’ll learn and this is vital for early childhood literacy development.

If you, like most parents and caregivers, feel stretched for time and have a busy life, you might not get as much time to read with your children as you would like.  That’s okay because you can still do reading activities without a book!  Read street signs out loud as you pass them by in the car when your little one is in the back seat.  Look at cereal boxes in the grocery store and read the names of the cereal out loud. Do this for infants too, and not just for toddlers and preschoolers.

By talking, reading, singing, writing and playing with your child every day she will not only be prepared for school and life but you will have fun together. And that’s one doctor’s order that is easy to follow!

Resources:

 

Advertisements