Daily Archives: October 17, 2014

Zombie Transformation

By the Library Reference Assistantzombie

backstory

  •  WHO WERE YOU AS A HUMAN? WHEN DID YOU LIVE?
  • OR DID YOU CLAW YOUR WAY OUT OF A GRAVE?
  • ARE YOU FRESHLY TURNED, WEEKS UNDEAD
  • WAS IT A CURSE?
  • DID YOU CATCH A RAGE VIRUS?
  • WERE YOU BITTEN?

 

supplies

  • LIQUID LATEX
  • TOILET PAPER
  • WHITE CREAM FACE PAINT
  • FLESH-COLORED CREAM FACE PAINT
  • AN ARRAY OF CREAM FACE PAINT IN WOUND COLORS (BLUE, PURPLE, RED, BLACK, YELLOW, ETC.)
  • PAINTBRUSHES, COTTON BALLS AND/OR COTTON SWABS
  • FAKE BLOOD
  • MILK CARTON (OPTIONAL)

 

wounds

  1. APPLY LIQUID LATEX AND RAGGED TOILET PAPER FOR DEEP GASHES. RIP OPEN ONCE DRY.
  2. FOR SHALLOW CUTS, APPLY THIN LAYERS OF LIQUID LATEX, ALLOW TO DRY AND TEAR OPEN.
  3. BLEND WHITE OVER WHOLE FACE.
  4. FILL WOUNDS WITH RED AND BLACK. BLEND OUTWARD WITH BLUE, PURPLE AND DASHES OF YELLOW FOR A ROTTING EFFECT.
  5. BE SURE TO APPLY DARK COLOR UNDER YOUR EYES FOR A SUNKEN LOOK.
  6. APPLY FAKE BLOOD TO WOUNDS AND MOUTH.
  7. FOR ADDED EFFECT, USE MILK CARTON CUTOUTS AND LATEX TO SIMULATE BONE.


Helpful Links


shamble

 

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The War that Killed Achilles: the true story of Homer’s Iliad and the Trojan War By Caroline Alexander.

9780670021123_custom-6a502cede7d6bcb9959048d49d9ed3377fe36778-s2-c85By Lindsay Roseberry, Reference Librarian

Ms. Alexander, the author of The Bounty; the true story of the mutiny on the Bounty and The Endurance: Shackleton’s Legendary Antarctic Expedition, has written another riveting account of an historical event, even though the Trojan War is often thought to be mythical. Alexander reveals the story part by part, giving historical background and quoting the epic in large chunks. She explains where Achilles came from, why he is the main character, and why after two millennia we still read and remember this epic poem. I would recommend this for those interested in ancient history, and even for those who are just trying to write a paper on the Trojan War. It kept my attention, and I even looked up some of the footnotes. It turns out there is evidence that Aeneas really did go to the Italian peninsula from Troy.

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