Monthly Archives: June 2014

Award Winners Revealed!

Janice Keck

Award Winner Photo1

Left: Fiction Winner John Neely Davis, Middle: Children’s Literature Winner Jean Simmons, Right: Non-Fiction Winner Brad Hoover

Introducing “Bullets and Bayonets: A Battle of Franklin Primer”

Battle of Franklin

We are pleased to reveal the cover of Academy Park Press’s next book. It is a primer on the Battle of Franklin that we believe will assist 4th and 5th graders in learning about it. We are especially excited about this book because, not only will it be published by the library’s imprint, but it is also created completely by library employees!

DNA tests for Genealogy

By Jason Gavin, Special Collections Librarian

DNA testing offers the modern genealogist an important and powerful tool that can provide unique information never available to previous generations of genealogists. In fact, there are so many companies offering DNA tests on today’s market, it can be somewhat daunting to know where to begin. In short, the answer to the question – “what kind of DNA test should I take?” can be answered by asking, “What kind of information are you hoping to get?” Below I’ll review some of the different types of genealogical DNA tests out there, and explain some of the pros and cons of each.

Y-DNA tests:

This test examines DNA found on the Y-chromosome. The Y-chromosome is one of the sex chromosomes that determine the gender of humans. Women of have an “XX” set of sex chromosomes while Men have an “XY” combination. Consequently, one drawback of the Y DNA test is that only males can take it, and it only traces a direct paternal line. It will give you information on your father’s father’s father, and so on, but no information about any females in your line, as the Y chromosome is only inherited by males. This means a Y DNA test can be especially useful for tracing surname history and origins, as surnames are also usually inherited along a direct paternal line.

Two males descended from the same male ancestor will have inherited the same DNA marker. That means that if you or a male relative and another person have the same marker 40 generations back, this test will let you know. One interesting consequent of this is what’s called the “Genghis effect”. In researching DNA dispersal through populations, it was discovered that a large proportion of the male population in Central Asia and beyond carry the same particular Y- DNA marker, meaning, they are all descended from the same single male. Further research concluded this was probably Genghis Khan, who conquered much of Asia and whose sons (who continued ruling in various parts of the continent) would have continued passing on this marker.

In addition, Y-DNA tests can provide “deep genealogical” information. Humans began migrating out of Africa beginning as early as 60,000 years ago, but they did so in waves. Often, there would be a wave of migrations to somewhere out of Africa – say the central Asia for example – and that wave would stay put for thousands of years, before a sub group would split of and travel to another area. These waves left their DNA markers in the places they traveled and settled. These markers can thus be divided into one of a number of identifiable “haplogroups”, the migrations of which can be traced by examining what percentage of a population carries a particular DNA marker.

DNA

Y-DNA PROS:     Can help trace family surname

Can provide matches with other males that have the same marker, this might help solve “brick walls”, or place your father’s line at a specific place and time.

Can provide “deep” genealogical haplogroup information

CONS:                  Only traces direct paternal decent.

Can only be taken by males.

TESTING COMPANIES:

–          Familytree DNA offers a variety of Y-DNA tests that vary in price depending on how many markers are to be tested, and will provide member matches and surname work groups as well.

–          The Nation Geographic Genographic 2.0 DNA test is more expensive, but will trace the Y-DNA line as well as the Mt and autosomal tests. However, it is focused on providing haplogroup information more than more recent genealogical data.

Mt-DNA

This kind of DNA test examines mitochondrial DNA. This DNA is only inherited from your mother. Thus this test will only provide information about you direct maternal line – your Mother’s mother, and on back. Unlike the gender exclusive Y-DNA test, however, this test can be taken by both males and females. This test is useful in providing haplogroup information, but provides the maternal haplogroup rather than the paternal. Since mitochondrial DNA is always inherited directly from the mother’s line unchanged, population geneticists can trace concentrations of particular DNA markers around the globe and extrapolate migration patterns from that. Both Family Tree DNA and the Genographic project also trace Mt DNA.

Mt-DNA PROS: Can provide matches with other females that have the same marker.

Can provide “deep” genealogical haplogroup information

CONS:                  Only traces direct maternal decent.

Autosomal DNA tests

These are the types of DNA tests offered by popular genealogy sites like Ancestry.com and 23andMe. The big advantage of this type of test, is that it traces both the father’s and the mother’s line. The drawback is that it is only accurate to a limited number of generations. You’ll get no haplogroup information here, but companies such as Ancestry do provide an “ethnicity estimate”. By comparing your DNA markers against a sample collection from various populations around the globe, a rough estimate can be made. They can, in effect, tell you “your DNA looks like its 20% Irish, 40% German, and 20% Russian” for example. Of course, this information can only be compared from comparatively recent generations, and is not the same as tracing one’s haplogroup back thousands of years. In addition, details about the sample population against which your DNA is being compared is generally proprietary, so we don’t know how many people were sampled, or from what exact area. Another big advantage of using companies like Ancestry.com, is that your much more likely to find a match between your DNA and another Ancestry.com user, since so many people use this popular site.

Autosomal tests:

PROS:    Traces both paternal and maternal lineage

More useful for more recent genealogy. Primarily 6 – 8 generations back.

Popular companies like Ancestry.com and 23&Me can provide a large number users against which to compare your DNA.

In general, these tests tend to be a bit less expensive

CONS:   Lacks any “deep” genealogical component – does not provide haplogroup information

Usefulness is largely determined by how many other users of this service have similar DNA to yours – thus there is no way to know how useful the test will be before you’ve taken it.

 

Some accessible introductions to using DNA to trace populations available at your library:

Brian Sykes:        Seven Daughters of Eve

Saxons, Viking, and Celts

Spencer Wells:  Deep Ancestry

The Journey of Man

Upcoming Events at Nolensville!

By Richard Groves, Nolensville Branch Head

The Nolensville Public Library has had a great summer so far. We’ve had record sign ups for summer reading, record program attendance, and the equivalent of the entire town has come through the doors in the last six weeks! But we aren’t done with summer yet…

Join us July 8-12 for Christmas in July week. First, Snowbird from WSMV will stop by on Tuesday the 8th @10:30 for a special winter story time. Then, on Wednesday the 9th @10:30 Mrs. Karen will do a special Polar Bear Christmas story time. Finally, on Saturday, July 12  10:00-2:00 stop by for DIY Christmas ornament crafting while supplies last.

Stop by the library to check out a good book or to cool off, but you never know when Santa might bring some Christmas goodies for you to enjoy.

The Hum and the Shiver by Alex Bledsoe

By Lindsay Roseberry, Reference Librarian

The Hum and the Shiver by Alex Bl10942400edsoe, is an urban fantasy set in rural Eastern Tennessee.  The mysterious community of Tufa is about to be in the spotlight now that wild child Bronwyn has returned home on leave to recuperate from captivity and war wounds.  She has to deal with the strained relations with her parents, the town and her siblings.  She has to find her music again, so essential for all Tufa.  Her ex-boyfriend wants to pick up where they left off , then there’s the haint that is trying to get her attention… All this while being hounded by the media and keeping her secretive community private.  It’s just too much for one person to handle.

I picked up this book for the East Tennessee location, but was drawn into Bronwyn’s world.  An unusual story by the author of the Eddie LaCrosse novels and the Firefly Witch series, The Hum and the Shiver quietly involves you.  When you finish you will start looking for a sequel (there are two so far) and wondering if there are Tufa in remote forests in the Eastern U.S.

Introducing “Where No Sorrows Come”

Where no sorrows come

We are pleased to share the cover of a new book: Where No Sorrows Come: The Life and Death of Confederate Brigadier General John Adams, by Bryan Lane.  Bryan Lane is a local Williamson County resident and part-time Battle of Franklin aficionado. He has worked for 20 years on a biography on John Adams. Adams was a confederate general in the battle. We are pleased to be assisting Mr. Lane in getting his book published to put in the hands of readers. This project is in the final stages and will be sent to Ingram in July.

Did You Know….The Leipers Fork Edition

By Emily Anglin, Leiper’s Fork Branch Head

The Leipers Fork branch of the Williamson County Public Library system recently celebrated its 25th anniversary.

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The Leipers Fork Public Library was opened on June 14, 1989, becoming the third branch of the Williamson County Public Library System. The library was originally located in the library room of the old Hillsboro School building.

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In the spring of 1999 the part of the building that housed the library was scheduled for demolition. It was then moved to the previous high school wing of the building that April, which had been remodeled along with the rest of the building. The building now houses the Leipers Fork library along with the Hillsboro/Leipers Fork Community Center.

Our branch offers year round children’s programming; we were the first branch in the library system to offer a toddler program. There is also a daily courier service so that you may have access to nearly 200,000 items system wide.

The Leipers Fork community is just outside of the Franklin city limits, less than ten miles from downtown Franklin. It’s a beautiful scenic drive — drop by some time for a visit.

Scroll down for some more photos of our 25th Anniversary celebration!!

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Terry Hedges, Master Magician comes to WCPLtn!!!

If you missed Terry Hedge’s performance on Thursday, June 5, you’re in luck!

Check out some of the photos from the event and remember, it’s still not too late to stop by and sign up for SUMMER READING!!!

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The Animal Appetites Show!!!

In case you missed our Summer Reading Kickoff show, on May 17, here are a few pictures to recap!

Bob and Caiman

Everyone had great fun learning about the wildlife food chain thanks to Bob Tarter of the Natural History Education Company!

Bob and Fennec Fox

We assure you, fun was had by all, and ALL of the animals behaved 🙂

Owl with wings open_1

 

Pixels AND Pigments are for Kids

Benefitting from Wildlife Books with Drawings and not Simply Photos  

By Lance Hickerson, Reference Assistant

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A few months ago in the children’s library I stopped abruptly upon glimpsing a book on the shelf that I had not seen since childhood. It was my very first bird book, the Golden Press Guide, Birds. Certainly it had an updated cover, but inside were many of the same drawings that started my birding in the fourth grade. Alongside the classic book were other bird guides for children. Some of them, like Birds A to Z by Chris Earley, contain clear and close up photos of the same birds covered by drawings in the Golden Guide. It was then that a question arose: Why have a bird book with drawings when you can have one with well-done photos? Aren’t we in the digital age? Why had Golden Press continued to use drawings when so many good photos were now available?

At first I thought the answer might be that the latest version of the Golden Guide continued to use drawings for cost-saving reasons. But near the Golden Guide were newer books like the World Book Science and Nature Guide to Birds, and the Usborne Spotter’s Guide to Birds, both full of detailed drawings and no photos. Is there something about drawings that photos cannot do?

I asked a similar question some years back to a talented painter who trained at Parsons and traveled to Nice, France each year creating Matisse-like water colors that hang on walls the world over. My question to her was this: “Why would anyone want a painted portrait, when they could hire a good photographer to do the same?” Her answer was instructive. She explained that a painting is able to express things a photograph might only accidentally show. A painting can reveal marks of character that endure over time, those aspects of heart that a single photographic instance will often miss. And that is why good portrait artists continue to get commissions, like Paul Emsley who recently completed a painting of Kate Middleton entitled, Portrait of Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge.
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Is there a sense in which the principles of portraiture apply to pictures of animals in general and birds in particular? Do we see good “portrait artists” of birds receiving commissions? The answer surprised me at first. A survey of some of the best bird identification field guides presently available shows that, while some have outstanding photos, others continue to offer painted bird drawings. Among these are The Sibley Guide to Birds, the National Geographic Field Guide to the Birds of North America, and the Peterson Field Guide to Birds of North America.

The lead artist for the National Geographic book, Jonathan Alderfer, comments on using illustrations versus photography. “Even though a series of photographs can reveal minute details, most birders eventually come to realize that illustrations are more helpful than photographs in a field guide. Art distills the image of a bird into what our brains experience rather than what a camera sees in a single instant, and illustrations are much easier to compare … “

David Allen Sibley recently released an update to his 2000 best seller, The Sibley Guide to Birds. He was interviewed by The Wall Street Journal (Ellen Gamerman, “Bird-World Star David Allen Sibley Releases New Guide,” March 12, 2014) which reveals the following:

A perpetual researcher, Mr. Sibley brings his binoculars everywhere, even to the gas station. He is always sketching in the field, a process he calls “interviewing the bird,” which he said allows him to internalize each bird’s gestures and shapes.

The Sibley guide has one main purpose: to help identify and differentiate more than 900 species. Mr. Sibley’s birds aren’t the most lifelike . . . but instead demonstrate the most essential traits of a species.

“Sibley’s achievement has been to draw birds not as they are but as they appear to the birder trying to identify them,” novelist Jonathan Franzen, an avid birder, wrote in an email. “They’re brilliant drawings of ideas, of what the birder needs to be seeing.”

In all this there is a strong irony. One of the greatest bird artists of all time has a wonderful society by his name (Audubon) that publishes an indispensable bird guide full of photographs. But as we have seen, others continue the drawing tradition that even today plays a significant role in acquainting us with nature. Bird watching is an increasingly popular hobby with presently around 47 million Americans participating. If the latest Golden Guide to birds (Birds of North America, Golden Field Guide from St. Martin’s Press) becomes our childrens’ first bird book among so many available, we have done well. There will always be good photos, but drawings can express things photos cannot. It is good that we, and our children, benefit from both.

 

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