Guest Post: Flu Prevention

By Patsy Watkins MPS, CFCS

Family & Consumer Sciences Agent, UT/TSU Extension, Williamson County

Influenza is a serious disease that can lead to hospitalization and sometimes even death. Even healthy people can get very sick from the flu and spread it to others.stop flu

All types of flu have similar symptoms that include:
•A 100°F or higherfever
•Coughing or sorethroat
•A runny or stuffynose
•Headaches and/orbody aches
•Chills
•Fatigue
•Nausea, vomiting,and/or diarrhea

In general, the flu is worse than the common cold and a test can determine whether you have the cold or flu.

Everyday steps that can help stop the spread of germs are washing hands often with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub; avoid touching eyes, nose, or mouth; get plenty of sleep and exercise, drink plenty of fluids, and eat healthy foods; and cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.

Getting Vaccinated each season is the single best way to prevent the flu. The people who should get vaccinated are people who have certain medical conditions including asthma, diabetes, and chronic lung disease, pregnant women, and people who are 65 years or older, and everyone 6 months of age or older should get the vaccine.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that people get vaccinated as soon as the flu season vaccine becomes available because it takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body and provide protection against the flu.

 

Sources:

Janice Keck Awards Ceremony

The Williamson County Public Library held the Janice Keck Literary Awards Ceremony in August with Bill Peach acting as the emcee.  The winners received their own Janice Keck Literary Award Medallions with family and friends, and many of the local community watching (unfortunately, Brad W. Hoover, the nonfiction winner for “Tears of Hope: Hero in a Bandanna”).

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Left: Sandy Coomer (Poetry: The Presence of Absence), holding book cover

Middle: John Neely Davis (Fiction: Bear Shadow), holding book cover

Right: Jean Simmons (Children’s Literature: Willy the Panther Cat), holding book cover

 

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Top Right: Awards Seal Design

Center: Book Cover for Non-fiction (Tears of Hope: Hero in a Bandanna) winner, Brad Hoover

Middle Right: Emcee Bill Peach

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer

51X-kOQpRsL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_Reviewed by Lindsay Roseberry

William Kamkwamba was born in 1987 and grew up in a rural village in Malawi. His family were farmers, generally making a little extra money with their crops of corn and tobacco, but often doing without. William had to drop out of elementary school because the family couldn’t afford the school fees.   He missed going to school but was happier when he found the tiny local library (6 shelves of books, all donated from other countries.) The books Explaining Physics and Using Energy changed his world. With help from a friend and a dictionary he learned about science and invention. .He learned about wind mills and how they could generate electricity. He thought about how much electricity would help his family: his mother wouldn’t have to go two hours away for firewood if they had a way to heat water with electricity; his father could grow two crops using irrigation by pumping water with an electric pump and they could have lights in the house. He started experimenting–he built a small wind mill first. He started scrounging for materials in an abandoned lot. He often didn’t have money; sometimes his friends helped out, other times he had to work several days to be able to buy a certain parts. He finally built his first windmill at the age of 15 in 2002. Much of his village had doubts about his sanity, until he lit a car light bulb with the electricity from his windmill. Word spread quickly about his accomplishment. An article was written about him in 2006 in a Malawi newspaper and word spread quickly In 2009 he went to Ghana to talk about his windmill. He was then invited to go

Bullets and Bayonets

cleburne

Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi

71GXQFa+RRLI can’t imagine living in a world where birds no longer fly, plants and animals are difficult to keep alive and the weather is even more unpredictable than living in middle Tennessee! The Reestablishment has tried to fix things but they are not being too successful. Seventeen year old Juliette has been locked up in prison and is on the verge of starvation! Now the Reestablishment wants to use her as a secret weapon!

As the plot enfolds, this dystopian/romance definitely entertains. My favorite character is Adam, the love interest, because I love the background story that connects him to Juliette. What intrigues me about this novel is the clever style in which Tahereh Mafi wrote the book. I love the way she crosses out Juliette’s initial thoughts and follows them with a more vanilla version. It is a neat way to hear the truth see what the character is thinking. The book is packed with metaphors and imagery—perhaps a bit overboard but I survived.

I would have to say that I liked this book. I’m still not completely certain of what special “superhuman” power Juliette possesses. How did she get it? How will the Reestablishment try to use it? Why does it affect some people and not others? Will she learn to control it?

I guess that’s what the sequel is for. I just hope it doesn’t veer into the comic hero genre.

Beginning genealogy: Those (not so) pesky neighbors!

By Jason Gavin, Special Collections Librarian

You’ve started your family genealogy, and zipped right through the first few generations using census records on Ancestry.com. Great! Then the inevitable happens – you hit a brick wall. Great-great-Grandma or Grandpa seems to simply disappear off the face of the Earth! Now what? It’s time to take a closer look at the census records you’ve already used, and look at those nosy neighbors.4332964512_8d5eb8f643_o

It’s always worth bearing in mind that census records were compiled by a (sometimes very) fallible human being walking door to door, knocking, and asking “who lives here?”. If you stay aware of this fact, you won’t make the mistake of assuming that because a name is spelled a particular way, in must not be Grandpa Stephen, because he spelled his name with a “v”. If the census taker heard “Gavin”, he might have written “Gavin” on the census. If, on the other hand, he heard “Caffin”, that’s what he’ll write (I’ve seen it happen!). And if the name was even slightly exotic, be it French, German, Italian, Swedish, etc. – forget about it! I am often tempted to believe that to be hired as a Federal census taker prior to 1900, applicants had to pass a grueling exam, where only the most hard-of-hearing, sloppiest penmanship, and poorest spellers passed. I can’t prove this, but I have my suspicions.

The other reason it’s worth remembering this door-to-door-knocking fact, is that it means all of the families listed above and below the family you’re researching were next door neighbors. This can be tremendously helpful! For one reason, youthful betrothed tended to marry the guy or girl next door, or a couple of houses down, or the next street over. If you can find great grandpa while he was single in the census records, you can very often find great grandma’s family on the next page or sometimes even living next door.

Another reason this is useful is because families during certain periods tended to move in groups. The Johnsons moved from North Carolina to Kentucky to Tennessee with the Smith family, for example. And along the way, sons might marry daughters. You never know how little clues like this might help you break through your brick wall. As an example, I found a house full of my ancestors in the 1880 census, along with a very elderly lady by a different last name of Hollingsworth. Continuing my line yielded a few more results, but I eventually hit the familiar brick wall. This was solved eventually not by researching my family name, but by tracing the Hollingsworths, and looking at their neighbors. And sure enough, I found a family of Hollingsworths living next door to some Gavins in 1850, which filled in the gap I was looking for and allowed me to plow headlong into the next brick wall on the Gavin line.

Paying attention to occupations and nationalities of neighbors can also lend some context to the history and kind of location your ancestors were in as well. Was everybody a farmer? This might indicate a poor rural location. Is there evidence for industry? Do you see blacksmiths or railroad workers clustered in the neighborhood? Were the majority of the neighbors German or Irish, or did they speak languages other than English? This might give a clue as to your ancestor’s nationality. What was the average age of people in the community? An extreme lack of elderly individuals might indicate the area was fairly newly established, whereas a uniform lack of young men of certain age might indicate heavy recruitment for a war.

Like so much in genealogy, the smallest, most overlooked clues can lead to big breakthroughs with a little patience and diligence.

Newsletter: September 2014

Vol.14, Issue 9

September 2014

Click Image to Read Newsletter

 

Ancestors Found Behind Locked Doors

shelvesYes the Special Collections Department does actually have some “locked doors,” but we the staff bring out the material for you, our patrons, to look at “ to your heart’s content.” One set of locked doors are the glass front cabinets in the Williamson Room where we have our Civil War collection of pre-1900 books about the Civil War and by the participants themselves.

Another locked door is our Manuscript Room where we house the Whitley Collection and other collections. Edythe Rucker Whitley (1900-1989) was a professional genealogist in Nashville from 1919 to the early 1970’s. She kept personal carbon copies of the research she did for various clients over a period of more than five decades. She also kept contemporary newspaper clippings of obituaries and articles on World War II soldiers. Helen Sawyer Potts later purchased this vast collection and donated it to the Williamson County Public Library in 1983. The collection consist of 538 acid free boxes containing three note books each .

 

To find out door if your last name is mentioned in the Whitley Collection go to the Library Web page and type your name into the catalog search box in the upper right hand corner of the web page.  The Whitley Collection is usually the last entry to come up, if the name is there.

For example, if you type in Mangrum (a good old Williamson County name) entry number 5 will say “Edythe Rucker Whitley Collection: Box 227.” Try typing in your last name, or as we genealogist call it “surname,” and come to Special Collections. And if you are under 50 years old, you will also learn what a carbon copy was before the days of Xrox and photo copiers.

Sister by Rosamund Lupton

sister-rosamund-lupton-ebook-e6e66Reviewed by: Lindsay Roseberry

Bee (Arabella Beatrice) received a frantic phone call from her mother—her sister Tess was missing. She took a leave of absence and flew back to England to help figure out what had happened.   Bee knew her sister wouldn’t have left London being eight months pregnant. She knew something had happened to her. But no one could find a thing. She asked Tess’ married boyfriend, she found the photographer obsessed with Tess’ beauty and she found her friends. When Tess is found, the police pronounce it suicide. Bee knows that couldn’t be true and continues her investigation. The further she investigates, the more she believes her sister was murdered.

Ms. Lupton writes in the first person, which I find more direct and personal. I had to read this book for a book club, but I liked it more than I thought I would. It drew me in, kept drawing me in until I had to finish regardless of time.

Break Down by Sara Paretsky

Reviewed by: Lindsay Roseberrybreakdown

V I (Vic) Warshawski’s cousin, Petra, called her, asking her to find a group of girls in her book group who were meeting secretly in an abandoned cemetery for some sort of ceremony. Some of them were from prominent families, and Petra hoped Vic could find them and get them home safely. Everything was fine until one of the girls thought she saw a vampire, ran scared and nearly fell on a man impaled on a ledger stone. Who was the man and was it a coincidence that he was killed where the girls were? The connections spread out like a spider web, and if V I Warshawski didn’t take great care, she would be caught up in it.

I hadn’t read a Sara Paretsky detective novel in quite a while. I was intrigued by the plot. I wanted to know how the two major events connected. I thought I knew who did it, but there were a few loose ends that threw me. I’ll have to go back and read them in order now.

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